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How To Write a Job Application Letter (With Examples)

application letter introduction sample

What is a Job Application Letter?

Tips for writing a job application letter, how to get started.

  • Writing Guidelines
  • What to Include in Each Section

Simple Formatting Using a Template

Tips for writing an effective letter, sample job application letter, sending an email application, review more letter examples.

Do you need to write a letter to apply for a job? Most of the time, the answer is yes. Even when employers don’t require a job application letter , writing one will help you highlight your skills and achievements and get the hiring manager’s attention. The only time not to send one is when the job listing says not to do so. It can help, and it definitely won't hurt to include an application letter with your resume.

A job application letter, also known as a cover letter , should be sent or uploaded with your resume when applying for jobs. While your resume offers a history of your work experience and an outline of your skills and accomplishments, the job application letter you send to an employer explains why you are qualified for the position and should be selected for an interview.

Writing this letter can seem like a challenging task. However, if you take it one step at a time, you'll soon be an expert at writing application letters to send with your resume.

Melissa Ling / The Balance

Before you begin writing your job application letter, do some groundwork. Consider what information you want to include (keeping in mind that space is limited).

Remember, this letter is making a case for your candidacy for the position. But you can do better than just regurgitating your resume—instead, highlight your most relevant skills, experiences, and abilities.

Analyze the Job Posting

To include the most convincing, relevant details in your letter, you'll need to know what the employer wants.

The biggest clues are within the job advertisement, so spend some time decoding the job ad . Next, match your qualifications with the employer's wants and needs .

Include Your Most Relevant Qualifications

Make a list of your relevant experience and skills. For instance, if the job ad calls for a strong leader, think of examples of when you've successfully led a team. Once you've jotted down some notes, and have a sense of what you want to highlight in your letter, you're ready to get started writing.

Writing Guidelines for Job Application Letters

Writing a job application letter is very different from a quick email to a friend or a thank-you note to a relative. Hiring managers and potential interviewers have certain expectations when it comes to the letter's presentation and appearance, from length (no more than a page) to font size and style to letter spacing :

Length: A letter of application should be no more than one page long. Three to four paragraphs is typical.

Format and Page Margins: A letter of application should be single-spaced with a space between each paragraph. Use about 1" margins and align your text to the left, which is the standard alignment for most documents.

Font: Use a traditional font such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri. The font size should be between 10 and 12 points.

What To Include in Each Section of the Letter

There are also set rules for the sections included in the letter, from salutation to sign-off, and how the letter is organized. Here's a quick lowdown on the main sections included in a job application letter:

Heading: A letter of application should begin with both your and the employer's contact information (name, address, phone number, email) followed by the date. If this is an email rather than an actual letter, include your contact information at the end of the letter, after your signature.

  •   Header Examples

Salutation: This is your polite greeting. The most common salutation is "Dear Mr./Ms." followed by the person's last name. Find out more about appropriate cover letter salutations , including what to do if you don't know the person's name, or are unsure of a contact's gender.

Body of the letter: Think of this section as being three distinct parts.

In the first paragraph , you'll want to mention the job you are applying for and where you saw the job listing.

The next paragraph(s) are the most important part of your letter. Remember how you gathered all that information about what employers were seeking, and how you could meet their needs? This is where you'll share those relevant details on your experience and accomplishments.

The third and last part of the body of the letter will be your thank you to the employer; you can also offer follow-up information.

Complimentary Close: Sign off your email with a polite close, such as "Best" or "Sincerely," followed by your name.

  • Closing Examples

Signature: When you're sending or uploading a printed letter, end with your signature, handwritten, followed by your typed name. If this is an email, simply include your typed name, followed by your contact information.

  • Signature Examples

Overwhelmed by all these formatting and organization requirements? One way to make the process of writing a job application easier is to use a job application letter template to create your own personalized job application letters for applying for a job. Having a template can help save you time if you are sending a lot of application letters.

Be sure that each letter you send is personalized to the company and position; do not send the same letter to different companies.

  • Always write one. Unless a job posting specifically says not to send a letter of application or cover letter, you should always send one. Even if the company does not request a letter of application, it never hurts to include one. If they do ask you to send a letter, make sure to follow the directions exactly (for example, they might ask you to send the letter as an email attachment, or type it directly into their online application system).
  • Use business letter format. Use a formal business letter format when writing your letter. Include your contact information at the top, the date, and the employer’s contact information. Be sure to provide a salutation at the beginning, and your signature at the end.
  • Sell yourself. Throughout the letter, focus on how you would benefit the company. Provide specific examples of times when you demonstrated skills or abilities that would be useful for the job, especially those listed in the job posting or description. If possible, include examples of times when you added value to a company.

Numerical values offer concrete evidence of your skills and accomplishments.

  • Use keywords. Reread the job listing, circling any keywords (such as skills or abilities that are emphasized in the listing). Try to include some of those words in your cover letter. This will help the employer see that you are a strong fit for the job.
  • Keep it brief. Keep your letter under a page long, with no more than about four paragraphs. An employer is more likely to read a concise letter.
  • Proofread and edit. Employers are likely to overlook an application with a lot of errors. Read through your cover letter, and if possible, ask a friend or career counselor to review the letter. Proofread for any grammar or spelling errors.

This is a job application letter sample.  Download the letter template (compatible with Google Docs or Word Online) or read the example below.

Sample Job Application Letter (Text Version)

Elizabeth Johnson 12 Jones Street Portland, Maine 04101 555-555-5555 elizabethjohnson@emailaddress.com

August 11, 2020

Mark Smith Human Resources Manager Veggies to Go 238 Main Street Portland, Maine 04101

Dear Mr. Smith,

I was so excited when my former coworker, Jay Lopez, told me about your opening for an administrative assistant in your Portland offices. A long-time Veggies to Go customer and an experienced admin, I would love to help the company achieve its mission of making healthy produce as available as takeout.

I’ve worked for small companies for my entire career, and I relish the opportunity to wear many hats and work with the team to succeed. In my latest role as an administrative assistant at Beauty Corp, I saved my employer thousands of dollars in temp workers by implementing a self-scheduling system for the customer service reps that cut down on canceled shifts. I also learned web design, time sheet coding, and perfected my Excel skills. 

I’ve attached my resume for your consideration and hope to speak with you soon about your needs for the role.

Best Regards,

Elizabeth Johnson (signature hard copy letter)

Elizabeth Johnson

When you are sending your letter via email include the reason you are writing in the subject line of your message:

Subject Line Example

Subject: Elizabeth Johnson – Administrative Assistant Position

List your contact information in your signature, rather than in the body of the letter:

Email Signature Example

Elizabeth Johnson 555-555-5555 email@emailaddress.com

Review more examples of professionally written cover letters for a variety of circumstances, occupations, and types of jobs.

CareerOneStop. " How Do I Write a Cover Letter ?" Accessed July 14, 2021.

University of Maryland Global Campus. " Frequently Asked Questions ." Accessed July 14, 2021.

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  • Cover Letter Intro

How to Write an Effective Cover Letter Intro

Your cover letter intro is your first opportunity to grab the reader's attention and generate serious interest in your job application.

How to write a cover letter intro plus examples

We show you how to start a cover letter by introducing yourself with conviction while shining a spotlight on the qualifications that make you an excellent fit for the job opportunity.

There are a number of ways to do this, we walk you through the process of developing a great introduction to your cover letter and provide effective examples of how to begin your cover letter.

5 key steps to write a good cover letter intro

1. Address the letter to someone by name

Get your cover letter off to the right start by ensuring your letter is addressed to an individual. Contact the company to get the full name, correct spelling and title of the person responsible for reviewing your resume.

Addressing your cover letter to "The Hiring Manager" or "To Whom it May Concern" immediately creates a disconnect between you and the reader.

2. Specify the job you are applying for

The hiring manager may be screening candidates for a number of different job openings so it is important to be explicit about the job you are applying for in your cover letter introduction.

3. Convey enthusiasm for the job

Show commitment from the word go by briefly articulating why you are excited about the job opportunity.

4. Highlight your suitability

Find out as much as you can about the job and company before writing your cover letter. You can then concisely introduce yourself as a well qualified candidate before going on to specify your relevant skills and experience in the body of your cover letter.

5. Tailor your cover letter intro for each job

Your introduction should be targeted to the specific job opportunity and company.

Good examples of how to introduce yourself in a cover letter

Specify the job opportunity and show your enthusiasm

Your online job posting regarding the ..... position immediately caught my eye and your company name caught my attention

Your recent job posting for the .....  position has captured my serious interest

I read  your job description for the .... position with great enthusiasm

I was excited to read your ..... job posting

I was very pleased to learn of your need for a .....

Introduce yourself with conviction

I believe that I am particularly well qualified for this position, please allow me to highlight my skills as they relate to your requirements...

I believe that my qualifications and experience, as presented below, combine to create an excellent match for the position...

I am convinced that I have the  skills and expertise to successfully fulfill your job needs...

The enclosed resume details my proven track record in a similar position, some key points you may find relevant include:

My previous work experience has equipped me with the skills and knowledge you are looking for,  in particular ....

This position will utilize my extensive experience in ....

I am confident that I will make an immediate and valuable contribution to your company, my credentials for this job include:

As a results-driven professional I believe I am well suited to this job, highlights of my achievements include the following :

5 cover letter intro examples that get the results you want

Here are 5 effective ways to start your cover letter when you are submitting a job application..

1. Introduce yourself in a professional manner

Let the employer know you are a serious and well qualified candidate for the job by introducing yourself in a direct and straightforward way.

application letter introduction sample

2. Introduce yourself with enthusiasm and conviction

Emphasize  your genuine interest in the position and the company and state your confidence that you are an excellent candidate for the job.

application letter introduction sample

3. Focus on your suitability for the job opportunity

Why are you a good match for the job? Let the company know what you can offer them in this position.

application letter introduction sample

4. Articulate your passion for the job

Employers seek individuals who show genuine passion for the work they are doing. Combined with the right skills, passion is a top driver of success in a job.

application letter introduction sample

5. What makes you the best candidate for the job? 

Use your cover letter intro to differentiate yourself from the competition. Start with a relevant and impressive accomplishment or skill that puts you ahead of the pack.

application letter introduction sample

Once you have grabbed the reader's attention with a powerful cover letter intro, the next step is to maintain interest and create the desire to learn more about you.

This is achieved in the body of your cover letter which brings attention to the skills, knowledge, expertise, achievements, qualifications and experience that make you a successful candidate for this specific position. It is a concise and compelling summary of what makes you the right job candidate.

You can use the structure of this cover letter template to help you with this next step.

In addition we have over 50 sample cover letters for different jobs that you can easily adapt for your own use.

Closing your cover letter

How you close your cover letter is as important as how you start it.

It is essential to end with the right message and ensure the reader takes action and continues on to read your resume with serious interest.

Find out how to close a cover letter strongly with good examples.

Everything you need to write a powerful cover letter

application letter introduction sample

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In order to write an effective cover letter intro it is essential that you have a clear understanding of the job opportunity. Use these complete job descriptions to help you with this.

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How to Write a Letter of Introduction (With Examples)

By Priya Jain

Published: January 22, 2024

Priya Jain

Writer & Career Coach

Writing a letter of introduction serves as a tool for individuals and businesses to establish new connections, explore opportunities, or introduce services and products. An effectively written letter of introduction can open doors to job opportunities, business collaborations, and networking.

Whether you’re a freelancer seeking new clients, a business looking to forge new partnerships, or an individual exploring job opportunities, a compelling introduction letter can set the stage for fruitful interactions.

In this article, we explain what a letter of introduction is, explore what to include, and give examples you can use while creating your letter. 

What Is a Letter of Introduction?

A letter of introduction is a document that introduces one party to another. It can serve various purposes in different contexts, including professional, academic, or personal settings. 

This letter can be used to introduce oneself or by someone else to introduce a third party. The key purpose is establishing a connection or a rapport with the recipient, usually with a specific goal, such as exploring job opportunities, proposing business collaborations, or extending networks.

Individuals can use letters of introduction in social settings, like joining a new club or group, where you want to introduce yourself to the members. These letters often introduce a third party, like a colleague or a friend, to your contacts. This can be particularly helpful in professional networking or recommending someone for a job or project .

The Difference Between a Letter of Introduction and a Cover Letter

A letter of introduction and a cover letter are very different. Letters of introduction are generally used when you want to establish a new relationship that may or may not be job-related. It could be an introduction to a potential business partner, a networking contact, or a new community or group. 

On the other hand, a cover letter is job-related. It’s sent alongside a resume when applying for a job. The cover letter focuses on why the applicant is suitable for a specific job, highlighting skills and experiences directly relevant to the job description. It’s more tailored to a particular role or company.

Letter of Introduction Examples

Here are some examples you can take inspiration from:

Job Application Letter of Introduction

This letter aims to introduce yourself to a potential employer, highlight relevant skills and experiences, express interest in the position, and provide a glimpse of your personality.

You can use this example to write a job application introduction letter:

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I am writing to express my keen interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With [X years] of experience in [relevant field/industry], I have developed a comprehensive skill set that aligns with your team’s requirements.

My experience at [Previous Company] involved [mention key responsibilities or projects related to the new job]. I am particularly excited about the opportunity at [Company Name] because of [reasons specific to the company or role].

Enclosed is my resume, which further outlines my achievements. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss how my experience and skills can contribute to the continued success of [Company Name].

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of contributing to your esteemed team.

[Your Name] [Your Contact Information]

Networking Introduction Letter

A networking introduction letter is a valuable tool for establishing new professional connections . It’s a way of introducing yourself to someone in your industry or field whom you haven’t met but wish to connect with for networking purposes.

Here’s an example:

Dear [Contact’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. I am [Your Name], currently working as a [Your Job Title] at [Your Company]. I came across your profile on [LinkedIn/Professional Event] and was impressed by your extensive experience in [relevant field/industry].

I am reaching out to expand my professional network in the [specific industry or field] and would value the opportunity to learn from your insights. [Mention any mutual connections or shared interests, if applicable].

If you are open, I would appreciate talking with you briefly. I want to hear about your experiences, particularly regarding [specific topic or question].

Thank you for considering my request. I understand the value of your time and would be flexible to accommodate your schedule.

Best regards,

Cold Outreach Letter of Introduction

A cold outreach letter of introduction is used when contacting someone who does not know you or is not expecting your communication. It’s typically used professionally to introduce yourself, your company, or your products/services to a potential client, partner, or employer.

Here’s an example:  

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

My name is [Your Name], and I am the [Your Position] at [Your Company]. I am reaching out to introduce our company and the innovative solutions we offer in [specific service or product area].

I believe that [Recipient’s Company] could significantly benefit from our [services/products], especially in [specific area of improvement or opportunity you’ve identified in their business]. We have partnered successfully with companies like yours, such as [mention any relevant clients or case studies], and achieved [mention specific results or improvements].

I would love the opportunity to discuss this further with you. Would you be available for a brief call next week? I am also attaching a brief overview of our services for your reference.

Thank you for your time, and I look forward to working together.

Warm regards,

Letter of Introduction Template

Creating a letter of introduction involves a structured approach to presenting your information effectively.

Here’s a template that you can adapt based on your specific needs:

[Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State, Zip Code] [Email Address] [Phone Number]

[Recipient’s Name] [Recipient’s Title] [Company/Organization Name] [Company Address] [City, State, Zip Code]

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

[Introductory Paragraph: Briefly introduce yourself, stating your name and current position or role. Explain how you came across the recipient, their work, or their organization.]

[Second Paragraph: State the purpose of your letter. Are you seeking a job opportunity, looking to network, or proposing a collaboration? Be specific about your intentions and why you are contacting this particular individual or company.]

[Third Paragraph: Concisely overview your relevant background and experience. Focus on key aspects of your career or education that align with the purpose of your letter.]

[Fourth Paragraph: Highlight one or two significant accomplishments or skills. Use specific examples demonstrating your capabilities and how they relate to the recipient’s needs or interests.]

[Fifth Paragraph: Mention any personal qualities or soft skills that set you apart and are relevant to the context of your introduction. Relate these traits to how they can be beneficial in achieving the goals outlined in your letter.]

[Call to Action: Clearly state what you hope to achieve with this letter. Whether it’s a follow-up meeting, a phone call, or further discussions, provide a clear action you’d like the recipient to take.]

Thank you for taking the time to read my letter. I am very interested in [discussing further, learning more about, etc.] and look forward to the possibility of [working together, meeting you, etc.]. Please contact me at [your email address] or [phone number].

[Your Name] [Attachments: Mention attachments such as your resume, portfolio, or other relevant documents.]

What You Need to Include in a Letter of Introduction

Incorporating specific elements in your letter of introduction can significantly enhance its effectiveness.

Here’s a breakdown of what to include following your provided structure:

Begin with a formal greeting. This is the initial greeting and sets the tone for the letter. Use a formal tone like “Dear [Recipient’s Name]”. If the recipient’s name is unknown, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” are alternatives. Personalizing the salutation, however, is preferable if you know the recipient’s name.

Introduction

Introduce yourself by stating your name and your current position or role in a professional context. This section should be brief, offering a snapshot of who you are. For instance, “My name is Jane Doe, and I am a Marketing Manager at XYZ Corporation.”

Purpose of the Letter

Clearly articulate why you are writing this letter. This might be to introduce yourself in a job search context, to propose a business collaboration, or to establish a new professional relationship. Be specific about why you’re contacting this particular individual or organization.

Background Information

Provide a concise overview of your professional background relevant to the purpose of your letter. This could include your current job, professional journey, or key areas of expertise. The aim is to give the reader context about your professional standing.

Relevant Accomplishments

Highlight significant achievements that are pertinent to the recipient. These could be successful projects you’ve led, awards you’ve won, or specific contributions you’ve made in previous roles. The objective is to showcase your competence and success in areas relevant to the letter’s purpose.

Personal Qualities

Share personal attributes that make you well-suited for the intended purpose of your letter. For instance, you might emphasize qualities like leadership, innovation, or collaborative skills if you are applying for a job. This part is about showing your personality and fit.

Call to Action

This is a crucial component where you suggest the next steps. It could be a request for a follow-up meeting, a phone call, or an invitation to review your application. Make it clear what you want the recipient to do next.

Conclude your letter with a formal and professional closing. Common closings include “Sincerely”, “Best regards”, or “Kind regards”, followed by your full name. This part signifies the end of your letter respectfully.

Attachments

If you include additional documents, such as a resume or portfolio, mention them here. For example, “Enclosed, please find my resume, which provides further details about my professional experience.”

What Not to Include in a Letter of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, it’s important to be aware of certain elements that should be avoided.

Here are what not to include: 

Unsubstantiated Claims

Your letter should avoid making broad statements about your abilities or achievements without providing specific examples or evidence to support them. For instance, rather than simply stating that you’re an excellent communicator, provide a brief example or mention a relevant accomplishment demonstrating this skill. The goal is to be as concrete and specific as possible to build credibility.

Clichés and Overused Phrases

Avoid overused phrases and clichés that don’t add substantive information to your introduction. Phrases like “team player,” “hard worker,” or “go-getter” are commonly used and don’t distinguish you from other candidates. Instead, use unique descriptions specifically tailored to your experiences and qualifications.

Unrealistic Promises

Be cautious about making promises or commitments that you might not be able to fulfill. Overpromising to impress can backfire if you cannot deliver on those promises later. It’s important to be honest and realistic about what you can offer to the potential employer or contact.

Best Practices for Writing Letters of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, following these best practices can greatly enhance the effectiveness and professional impact of your letter:

Tailoring the Letter to the Audience

By researching and familiarizing yourself with the recipient’s work and organization, you can ensure that your letter speaks directly to their needs and interests. Personalization in the letter demonstrates that you have taken the time to understand who they are and what they value, which can significantly increase the effectiveness of your message.

Keeping It Concise and Focused

An effective letter conveys your message in a clear, succinct manner. Long letters can dilute the impact of your key points and lose the reader’s interest. 

Structuring your letter with a clear beginning, middle, and end helps maintain this focus. The introduction should grab attention, the body should elaborate on your purpose and relevant qualifications, and the conclusion should reiterate your intent and suggest the next steps.

Showcasing Personality and Authenticity

An impactful letter is about what you say and how you say it. Infusing your letter with genuine personality and authenticity makes your message resonate more with the recipient. It’s about striking the right balance between professional decorum and personal touch.

Sharing your motivations, interests, or perspectives in a way that aligns with the professional context can make your letter memorable and establish a more personal connection with the recipient.

Proofreading for Clarity and Professionalism

The final yet crucial step in drafting your letter is thorough proofreading. This step is imperative for ensuring your letter is free from grammatical errors and typos and communicates your message.

A well-written and professionally presented letter reflects your attention to detail and commitment to quality. Having someone else review your letter is often beneficial, as a fresh pair of eyes can catch errors and provide feedback on your message’s overall clarity and tone.

Priya Jain

About the Author

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How To Write A Letter Of Introduction For Job Seekers (Samples Included)

Jeff Gillis 0 Comments

letter of introduction

By Jeff Gillis

Updated 6/14/2022.

For many job seekers, nothing’s more frustrating than the words, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.”

What if you don’t know anyone? Perhaps you’ve moved to a new city, switched industries, or simply didn’t recognize the importance of networking until recently. How can talented individuals in this situation play catch-up and get their careers started?

It isn’t impossible, and you don’t have to be obnoxious to get in front of the right people. In fact, there’s an entire method for introducing yourself to people you’ve never met but would like to know. It’s called sending a Letter of Introduction.

What Exactly Is a Letter of Introduction?

So, what is a letter of introduction? A letter of introduction is, according to Military One Source , correspondence that “notifies an employer of your qualifications and interest to be considered for potential future positions.”

However, it can also be more. For example, you could send a letter of introduction to a potential new network contact, allowing you to expand your circle.

Essentially, the letter of introduction is a way to reach out to someone asking to make their acquaintance and, if they’re willing, find out about job opportunities or forge new connections in your desired industry. It’s a polite way to get your name in front of important people without infringing on their time or accosting them in a coffee shop.

It’s also important to understand what an introduction letter is not. It isn’t your resume , it’s not a cover letter , and it’s not a short story detailing your early life, dreams, and ambitions. You don’t send one in response to a current job posting.

Instead, it’s a brief, clear, and concise explanation of who you are as a professional and why you are writing. This reason could be that you’re looking for a job, or you’re hoping to chat with them to gain some insight into the industry you wish to enter.

Types of Introduction Letters

An introduction letter can be used to introduce yourself to someone new or to introduce a friend or colleague to someone you know. Introduction letters are either formal or informal. Typically speaking, an informal introduction letter is used in the second case where Person A is introducing Person B to Person C.

How to Write the Different Kinds of Letters of Introduction

Writing an informal introduction letter to introduce someone to a third party is rather simple. Since you know the person you’re introducing them to, you can rely on your own judgment when choosing your wording. For this article, we’ll focus on a relatively formal letter, even if it’s to a colleague. Such a letter should include the following features:

  • An explanation of why you’re writing
  • A brief description of who you’re introducing them to, relevant details like their job, and how you personally know them
  • A few lines on what that person needs (i.e., advice on entering the tech world with a finance background) and why you thought your colleague would be a useful resource
  • The job seeker’s contact information, ideally both their telephone number and email address

Today, most people send letters of introduction via email. Be mindful of how you send that email. For instance, there’s a difference between sending a letter of introduction and a referral letter.

Let’s say your friend needs a freelance copywriter. You worked with a great copywriter previously, and you tell your friend you’ll send their details.

In this case, you’re mainly sending a referral, as you’re connecting a professional connection to a friend with a specific need. While this is an amazing thing to do – as 72 percent of interviews are referrals – it isn’t the same as a letter of introduction.

Now, let’s change the circumstances a bit. In this scenario, let’s pretend your friend owns a copywriting agency.

Your professional connection is looking for a full-time gig and asks you to introduce them to someone who works in an agency. When you send the message out, you aren’t referring your professional contact for a specific opening. Instead, you’re letting your friend know a bit about who they are and providing contact details that allow your friend to reach out to your professional connection if they so choose. That’s an introduction letter.

When writing a letter of introduction for yourself, the steps are almost identical with a few subtle differences:

  • Dive right into who you are and what you do
  • Include a few lines about why you’re writing to them and specific details about what you’d like from them, like industry insights or information on job opportunities.
  • Provide information on how they can reach you, how you look forward to speaking with them, and a thank you for their time
  • End with a respectful sign-off

Letter of Introduction Samples

In some cases, it’s far easier to see how to approach a situation by checking out a few examples. Here is a sample letter of introduction for when you’re writing on behalf of someone else and another for when you’re writing on behalf of yourself:

Introductory Letter on Behalf of Someone Else

Hi Jane Doe, It was a pleasure catching up with you at the networking event last week! I’d like to take a moment to introduce you to John Smith, a project manager with nearly a decade of experience, specifically in the technology niche. I’ve personally worked with him several times during his time with ABC Corp, and I’ve grown to trust his expertise over the years. Currently, John is exploring new opportunities and was hoping to connect with you about potential future openings at your company. I’ve attached his resume for you to review, and you can also find him on LinkedIn using the link in that document. If you’d like to touch base by phone, you can contact him at 555-555-5555. While I’m not aware of any current hiring needs on your end, I do believe John would be an asset. Sincerely, James

Introductory Letter on Behalf of Yourself

Dear John Doe, My name is Jane Smith, and I’m a marketing manager with ten years of experience in the field, focused mainly on the food and beverage space. I’ve long been a fan of your company – XYZ Inc. – particularly its recent campaign for leading snack food manufacturer ABC Co. If you have the time, I would love to talk to you about opportunities with your company, as well as gain career insights from a leader in the field, such as yourself. If you’re available, I can be reached at 555-555-5555. You can also reply to this email and view my portfolio using the link in my signature. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you. Best, Jane Smith

These are rather formal examples of an introductory letter, focusing on professionals in the project management niche. Additionally, they’re relatively simple, showing you the general structure to follow.

In some cases, you could expand on various points based on the nuances of the company and what the job seeker has to offer. However, it’s crucial to keep things concise. Now isn’t the time to tell someone’s life story. Instead, the goal is to make an initial connection that can be built upon later.

It’s also true that less formal letters sometimes work. However, you don’t want to run the risk of alienating someone you don’t know with what feels like a gimmick or a sales letter. That’s why formal is often the way to go, regardless of whether you’re introducing yourself or someone else.

Use these examples as a letter of introduction template, giving you a solid starting point. Then, adjust the details as needed to ensure it makes the best possible impression.

Putting It All Together

A letter of introduction allows you to even the playing field when it comes to the game of “who knows who.” If you can dedicate time to send a letter (or email) of introduction each week to people you’d like to meet, a certain percentage will likely reply back – so long as you don’t simply cut and paste the same letter for everyone.

Whether it’s to land a new job or break into a new industry, take advantage of the power of introductory letters.

application letter introduction sample

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Co-founder and CTO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Jeff is a featured contributor delivering advice on job search, job interviews and career advancement, having published more than 50 pieces of unique content on the site , with his work being featured in top publications such as INC , ZDnet , MSN and more. Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

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application letter introduction sample

Status.net

A Perfect Letter of Introduction [Examples]

By Status.net Editorial Team on June 14, 2023 — 15 minutes to read

  • How To Write a Letter of Introduction Part 1
  • Types of Introduction Letters Part 2
  • Letter of Introduction Template Part 3
  • Templates: Letter of Introduction for Job Seekers Part 4
  • Templates: Letter of Introduction for Networking Part 5
  • Templates: New Team Member Letter of Introduction Part 6
  • Employee to Customer Introduction Letter Template Part 7
  • Business Introduction Template Part 8
  • Tips for Writing a Perfect Letter of Introduction Part 9

A good letter of introduction can be a valuable tool in making new connections, whether for personal, professional, or business purposes. In this article, we’ll explore how to write a perfect letter of introduction.

To begin, it’s important to understand the difference between a letter of introduction and other forms of introductory communication. An introduction letter isn’t a cover letter – rather, it serves to establish relationships and spark interest.

Difference Between Introduction Letter and Cover Letter

An introduction letter is not a cover letter. While both documents are used to make introductions, they serve different purposes. An introduction letter is typically written to introduce yourself, your business, or a third party, whereas a cover letter is used when applying for a job or sending a proposal. In an introduction letter, you should briefly highlight your background, accomplishments, and goals, while in a cover letter, you should focus on how your skills and experiences relate to a specific job opportunity.

Introduction Letter vs. Letter of Recommendation

An introduction letter is also not a letter of recommendation. A letter of recommendation is written by someone who knows you well, like a former employer, teacher, or mentor, to vouch for your abilities and accomplishments. It often includes specific examples of your work and contributions, as well as why the person is recommending you for a certain position or opportunity.

Related: A Perfect Letter of Recommendation [8 Templates]

An introduction letter is written by you or on behalf of an individual or company to make an initial connection with others. While you might mention your skills and experience in an introduction letter, it doesn’t have the same weight or credibility as a letter of recommendation, since it lacks the endorsements from others.

Related: How to Ask for a Letter of Recommendation [Examples]

The Full Guide to Reference Letters [Best Templates]

  • An introduction letter is used to introduce yourself, your company, or a third party to others.
  • A cover letter is used when applying for a job or submitting a proposal, focusing on how your skills and experiences relate to the specific opportunity.
  • A letter of recommendation is a formal endorsement of your abilities and accomplishments, written by someone who knows you well.

Remember to use the appropriate type of letter for each situation and adhere to the specific guidelines and tone for each document: this will ensure your communication is effective and appropriate, increasing your chances of making a positive impression.

Part 1 How To Write a Letter of Introduction

Format and structure.

To write an effective letter of introduction, start with proper formatting. Use a standard font, such as Arial or Times New Roman, and set the font size to 12. Stick to a formal tone, and use single spacing with a space between paragraphs.

Greeting and Opening Remarks

Begin your letter with a professional greeting. If you know the recipient’s name, use “Dear [Name].” If not, use “Dear [Title]” or “To Whom It May Concern.” Your opening remarks should briefly explain the purpose of the letter and introduce yourself or the person you are introducing.

Related: How to Start a Letter (and Mistakes to Avoid)

In the main body of the letter, provide details about yourself or the person you are introducing. Focus on the key qualifications, skills, and experiences that are relevant to the recipient. This is also an ideal place to mention any mutual connections or shared interests.

  • Keep the paragraphs short and concise.
  • Highlight your achievements or expertise.
  • Use bullet points or tables to enumerate qualifications or experiences, if necessary.

Closing and Sign Off

To close the letter, express your gratitude to the recipient for their time and attention. Offer your assistance if they have further questions or would like additional information. Use a standard sign-off, such as “Sincerely,” “Best Regards,” or “Yours Faithfully,” followed by your full name and contact information (e.g., email, phone number).

Related: How to End an Email Professionally (Examples)

Remember to proofread your letter of introduction and ensure that spelling, grammar, and punctuation are accurate before sending it off.

Part 2 Types of Introduction Letters

Job-related introductions.

In job-related introduction letters, you are typically introducing yourself as a potential employee or applicant. This is useful when seeking new job opportunities, submitting your resume, or reaching out to potential employers. Your letter should showcase your skills, experience, and enthusiasm for the position while also expressing your interest in the company and its mission.

Networking Introductions

When networking, it’s important to make a great first impression by introducing yourself effectively. In a networking introduction letter, the goal is to establish a connection with an individual or a group within your industry. Mention your title, role, and any common acquaintances you may have. Also, highlight some of your accomplishments or notable experiences relevant to the people you’re introducing yourself to.

Agency or Freelancer Introductions

If you are an agency or a freelancer looking for clients, an introduction letter is a great way to showcase your services and expertise. The focus should be on how you can support the client’s needs and help them achieve their goals. Provide a brief overview of your industry experience, the services you offer, and some examples of successful projects or satisfied clients.

Team Introduction

In a team introduction letter, your objective is to introduce your team members to a new client, project team, or department. Detail the relevant qualifications, skills, and areas of expertise for each team member. This will help establish trust and confidence in your team’s abilities. Be sure to include contact information to facilitate further communication.

Letter of Introduction Examples

Part 3 letter of introduction template.

Dear [Recipient],

I hope this letter finds you well. My name is [Your Name], and I am writing to introduce myself to you. [Insert a brief sentence or two about yourself, such as your current position or relevant experience]. I am reaching out to you because [insert reason for writing the letter, such as expressing interest in a job opportunity or seeking to establish a professional relationship].

I am excited to learn more about your organization and explore opportunities for collaboration. Please feel free to reach out to me at [insert contact information] if you have any questions or would like to discuss further.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Best regards, [Your Name]

Templates for various types of introduction letters:

Part 4 Templates: Letter of Introduction for Job Seekers

When you are seeking a new job, it’s essential to introduce yourself professionally. Here’s an example of a letter of introduction for job seekers:

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. My name is [Your Name] and I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. I came across your job posting on [Job Board/Website] and believe my skills and experience make me an ideal candidate.

Throughout my career, I have worked on various projects focusing on [specific skills or subject matter]. At my previous job at [Previous Company Name], I [describe a significant achievement or responsibility]. Additionally, I am skilled in [list relevant skills] and have experience using [software or tools related to the job].

I have attached my resume for your review, which includes more information on my background and qualifications. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss my suitability for the position during an interview. Please feel free to contact me at [Your Email] or [Your Phone Number] to schedule a meeting or for any further information.

Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sincerely, [Your Name] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

Related: Best Job Interview Request Email Responses (Examples)

Subject: [Your Name] – [Target Job Title]

I came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company Name] and after reviewing your company’s impressive accomplishments in [Industry], I believe that my [Number of Years] years of experience in a similar role make me an ideal fit.

Enclosed is my resume, which highlights my expertise in [Specific Skills or Accomplishments]. I am confident that my experience in [Area of Expertise] would make a valuable contribution to your team.

[Optional: Mention any mutual connections, if applicable.]

I would welcome the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further and explore how I could contribute to [Company Name]’s success. Thank you for considering my application.

Part 5 Templates: Letter of Introduction for Networking

A networking introduction letter aims to establish connections with potential clients, partners, or colleagues.

Subject: Introduction – [Your Name] and [Recipient’s Name]

Hi [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. I came across your profile while searching for professionals in the [Industry] field, and I am impressed by your experience and accomplishments.

As a fellow professional in the [Industry], I believe that connecting with like-minded individuals like yourself can greatly benefit both our careers. I am particularly interested in [Specific Area of Interest] and would appreciate any insights or advice you may have.

If you’re open to it, I’d love to set up a time to chat over a coffee or a quick phone call. Looking forward to your response.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

I hope this email finds you well. My name is [Your Name], and I am a [Your Profession or Title] at [Your Company or Organization]. I recently attended the [Event or Conference Name] and saw your insightful presentation on [Topic]. Your ideas resonated with me, and I believe your expertise could benefit the projects I am currently working on.

My current projects involve [briefly describe your projects, e.g., developing new software or implementing a marketing strategy]. I am eager to learn more about your work in [Recipient’s Field of Expertise] and would love to schedule a phone call or coffee meeting to discuss our shared interests and potential collaboration.

Please let me know when you are available, and I will be happy to make arrangements. You can contact me at [Your Email] or [Your Phone Number].

Looking forward to connecting with you.

Part 6 Templates: New Team Member Letter of Introduction

Template 1: introducing yourself.

When joining a new team, a letter of introduction helps introduce you to your colleagues and establish rapport.

Subject: Hello from [Your Name], your new [Job Title / Team Role]

Dear [Team Name or Colleagues],

I hope this email finds you all in good spirits. My name is [Your Name], and I am excited to join the [Company Name] team as your new [Job Title / Team Role]. It’s a pleasure to meet all of you!

A little bit about myself: I have been working in the [Your Industry] for [Number of Years] years, mainly focusing on [Area of Expertise]. My skills include [list relevant skills], and I am proficient in [software or tools you will be using].

In my spare time, I enjoy [mention personal hobbies or interests to connect on a personal level].

I am eager to contribute to the team’s success and look forward to learning from each of you. Please feel free to reach out if you have any questions or concerns, or if you would like to grab lunch or coffee together.

Thank you for the warm welcome, and have a great day!

Best, [Your Name]

Template 2: New Team Member

Welcome a new team member with this template, outlining their role and initial responsibilities.

Subject: Welcome [New Team Member’s Name]!

Dear [Existing Team Members],

Please join me in extending a warm welcome to our newest team member, [New Team Member’s Name]. [He/She/They] will be joining us as a [New Team Member’s Job Title] effective [Start Date].

[New Team Member’s Name] brings with them a wealth of experience in [Area of Expertise], having worked at [Previous Company] for [Number of Years Experience]. In their new role, they will be responsible for [Responsibilities].

We are excited to have [New Team Member’s Name] on board and look forward to their contributions as we continue to grow and succeed.

Please take the time to introduce yourself to [New Team Member’s Name] and offer any assistance they may need as they familiarize themselves with our processes and systems.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Title]

Part 7 Employee to Customer Introduction Letter Template

Introducing an employee to clients or customers:

Dear [Customer],

I am writing to introduce you to our newest team member, [Employee Name]. [He/She] is joining us as [Position/Title] and brings with [him/her] [Number] years of experience in [Industry/Specialization].

[Employee Name] is an expert in [Skill/Expertise] and has a proven track record of delivering exceptional [Service/Product]. [He/She] is committed to providing our customers with the highest level of service and ensuring that their needs are met with the utmost care and attention.

We are thrilled to have [Employee Name] on board and believe that [he/she] will be a valuable asset to our team and to our customers. [He/She] is excited to meet and work with all of you, and we are confident that you will find [him/her] to be a knowledgeable and helpful resource.

Please join me in welcoming [Employee Name] to our team and we look forward to continuing to serve you with excellence.

Sincerely, [Your Name] [Your Title] [Company Name]

Part 8 Business Introduction Template

Introduce your business to potential clients, partners, or investors with this template.

Subject: Introducing [Your Company Name]

I would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to [Your Company Name], a [Description of Your Business] that specializes in [Product/Service Offering]. We have successfully served clients in [Industry] for [Number of Years/Timeframe].

Our key services/products include: – [Service/Product 1] – [Service/Product 2] – [Service/Product 3]

We understand the challenges faced by businesses like yours in the [Industry] sector and have a track record of delivering solutions tailored to your needs. Our expertise in [Specific Area] allows us to offer you the best possible service.

We would be thrilled to explore how our offerings can provide value to your organization. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions or would like to schedule a meeting.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Title] [Your Company] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

Part 9 Tips for Writing a Perfect Letter of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, it is important to keep it brief. Clearly state the purpose and get straight to the point. Remember, your recipient may have a busy schedule, so limit your introduction to a few paragraphs. Being concise ensures that your message is understood and remains memorable.

Use a Professional Tone

Maintain a professional tone throughout your letter of introduction. Be confident, knowledgeable, and clear. Avoid using casual language or informal expressions. This demonstrates your respect for the recipient and reflects well on your professionalism.

Include Contact Information

Ensure that you include your contact information, such as email address and phone number, so the recipient can easily reach you. This can be placed at the beginning or end of the letter. Including your contact information allows the recipient to respond and take the desired action.

Before sending your letter of introduction, proofread it carefully for errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. A well-written, error-free letter shows attention to detail and care in your communication. Ask a colleague or friend to review your letter for additional insights and suggestions.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you start a good introduction letter.

To start a good introduction letter, ensure you have a clear purpose for the letter. Begin by addressing the recipient by name if possible and introducing yourself. State the reason for writing the letter and try to engage the recipient’s interest with a hook, such as a shared connection or a relevant accomplishment. Example:

My name is [Your Name] and I am writing to introduce myself and express my interest in [reason for writing the letter]. I hope this letter finds you well.

I wanted to reach out to you because [hook – shared connection or relevant accomplishment]. As someone who is [briefly describe your background or experience], I believe that I would be a valuable asset to your [company/organization/project].

I am excited to learn more about your work and how I can contribute to it. Please feel free to reach out to me at [contact information] to discuss this further.

Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

What distinguishes a letter of introduction from other types of letters?

A letter of introduction is specifically written to introduce yourself, your business, or an employee to another party. It aims to establish a relationship, provide information about your expertise or service offerings, and potentially open up opportunities for collaboration. Unlike cover letters, which focus on a specific job position, introduction letters highlight your skills or experiences more broadly and are often used for networking purposes.

What are the different types of introduction letters?

Introduction letters come in various forms, such as:

  • Business to Business (B2B) – Introducing a company, product, or service.
  • Employee to Customer – Introducing an employee to clients or customers.
  • Self-introduction – Introducing oneself for networking, job applications, or collaboration opportunities.
  • New Hire Introduction – Introducing a new employee to the team or organization.

What are some effective tips for writing a letter of introduction?

  • Be concise and clear about your purpose.
  • Use a professional tone and language.
  • Personalize the letter by addressing the recipient by name.
  • Emphasize your strengths, experiences, or areas of expertise.
  • Include a call-to-action, such as requesting a meeting or asking the recipient to review your attached documents.
  • Proofread and edit your letter for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.
  • How to Ask for a Letter of Recommendation [Examples]
  • How to Start a Letter (and Mistakes to Avoid)
  • How to End an Email Professionally (Examples)
  • Emotional Intelligence (EQ) in Leadership [Examples, Tips]
  • A Perfect Letter of Recommendation [8 Templates]
  • Effective Nonverbal Communication in the Workplace (Examples)

IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. 7 Powerful Ways To Start a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    1. Convey enthusiasm for the company If you're genuinely attracted to the company's brand or have used its products or services before, you can describe your enthusiasm in the first sentence of your cover letter. Employers value authentic enthusiasm because it often translates to highly motivated and successful employees.

  2. How to Start a Cover Letter [+ Introduction Examples]

    Here's your answer: Arrange the header. Address the hiring manager properly. Be strategic with your opening sentence. Showcase your best assets in the 1st paragraph.

  3. Letter of Introduction Examples and Writing Tips

    Sam Edwards / Getty Images Do you need to write a letter introducing yourself to a prospective employer, a networking contact, or a potential new client? A well-written letter of introduction can result in a valuable relationship, and help you find a new job or acquire a new client.

  4. How to Start a Cover Letter: Introduction Examples & Tips

    1. Mention a contact within the company If you were referred by a former coworker, classmate, or friend who's highly regarded in their company, mention their name in the opening sentence of your cover letter for some immediate credibility. Example : Well-Connected

  5. How to Write a Letter of Application (Example & Tips)

    Download Free Example Letter of Application Template (Text Version) An effective letter of application: expands on the skills, achievements, and professional experiences you want to highlight explains your personal interest in applying to the position describes what you can offer the company Sound tough?

  6. Sample Cover Letter for a Job Application

    Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for an email sample. The Balance. Download the Word Template. John Donaldson. 8 Sue Circle. Smithtown, CA 08067. 909-555-5555. [email protected]. September 6, 2022.

  7. How To Write an Application Letter (With Template and Example)

    1. Research the company and job opening Thoroughly research the company you're applying to and the specifications of the open position. The more you know about the job, the better you can customize your application letter. Look for details like: Recent awards the company has received

  8. 30 Better Ways to Start a Cover Letter

    Communicate that you'll bring something to the company: You'll get more into the details after your opening, of course. But your cover letter opener should still tell the reader, "This person can do something for us ," rather than, "This job would really help them .". Stick to the point: Your opener, while creative, should still be ...

  9. 200+ Professional Cover Letter Examples for Job Seekers

    5. Career change cover letter example. Writing a cover letter for a job in your current industry is pretty straightforward. But writing a career change cover letter requires a slightly different approach. The sample cover letter below includes the three elements you need to persuade a hiring manager you're ready to transfer industries:

  10. What is a letter of introduction and how do you write one?

    12 min read Artwork by: Evgeniya Skubina When you are looking for a new job or client, the first step is to send a letter to introduce yourself. A letter of introduction is the first point of contact and it allows you to tell the recipient a bit more about you, with the potential outcome of gaining a new job or business contact as a result.

  11. How To Write a Job Application Letter (With Examples)

    Heading: A letter of application should begin with both your and the employer's contact information (name, address, phone number, email) followed by the date. If this is an email rather than an actual letter, include your contact information at the end of the letter, after your signature. Header Examples.

  12. Letter of Application: Job Example, Format & How-To Guide

    Katarzyna Furman Updated: January 03, 2024 Our customers have been hired by: Table of Contents Oh, come on! What is this? Another letter to get an interview? That was your reaction to hearing a "letter of application" for the first time. Am I wrong? The list seems never to end: a cover letter, covering letter, motivation letter…

  13. How to Write an Effective Application Letter (Examples)

    This will make it easy for the recipient to get in touch with you if they have any questions or require additional information. Here's an example of a proper letter ending for your application letter: Sincerely, [Space for physical signature, if applicable] Your Full Name [email protected] +1-234-567-8901.

  14. Cover Letter Intro, best examples of how to begin a cover letter

    Here are 5 effective ways to start your cover letter when you are submitting a job application.. 1. Introduce yourself in a professional manner. Let the employer know you are a serious and well qualified candidate for the job by introducing yourself in a direct and straightforward way. 2.

  15. How to Write a Letter of Introduction (With Examples)

    You can use this example to write a job application introduction letter: Dear [Hiring Manager's Name], I am writing to express my keen interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With [X years] of experience in [relevant field/industry], I have developed a comprehensive skill set that aligns with your team's requirements.

  16. How To Write A Letter Of Introduction For Job Seekers (Samples Included)

    UPDATED 6/14/2022 For many job seekers, nothing's more frustrating than the words, "It's not what you know, it's who you know." What if you don't know anyone? Perhaps you've moved to a new city, switched industries, or simply didn't recognize the importance of networking until recently.

  17. How to Write the 1st Paragraph of Your Cover Letter

    1. Greet the recipient. One key to a great cover letter is pretty simple: Do your best to address the correct person. "To whom it may concern" or "Dear Sir" is very generic and tells the reader that you haven't done your homework on finding the identity of the hiring manager. Show you've done your homework by personalizing the letter.

  18. 40+ Letter of Introduction Templates & Examples

    Letter of Introduction Sample Exclusive Download 30 KB Letter of Introduction for a New Employee 1 Exclusive Download 30 KB Letter of Introduction for a New Employee 2 Exclusive Download 28 KB Letter of Introduction for Internship 1 Exclusive Download 29 KB Letter of Introduction for Internship 2 Exclusive Download 28 KB

  19. A Perfect Letter of Introduction [Examples]

    To sum up: introduction letter is used to introduce yourself, your company, or a third party to others. cover letter is used when applying for a job or submitting a proposal, focusing on how your skills and experiences relate to the specific opportunity.

  20. Cover Letter for an Internship: Writing Tips & Examples

    A cover letter for an internship, also called a letter of introduction, an application letter, or a personal statement, expresses how your skills and experiences make you the best candidate for the position. It should showcase your personal style while expanding upon and complementing your résumé. Always include a cover letter when it is requested to solidify your chance of becoming a ...

  21. 7 Application Letter Samples

    Date Dear Ms. Micheal, I am writing this letter to apply for a junior programmer position advertised in your organisation. As requested, I am enclosing a completed job application, my certificates, my resumes, and four references in this letter. The opportunity presented in this listing is exciting.

  22. Letter of Introduction: Overview and Examples

    Hanne Keiling Updated September 28, 2023 Image description A letter of introduction is a type of correspondence, usually email, used to introduce someone you know to someone else. Introduction letters can help build professional relationships that lead to job opportunities, business growth and collaboration.

  23. How to Write a Letter of Introduction (with Examples)

    You can write a good letter of introduction by following a few key steps: Write a suitable greeting A letter of introduction should be treated as a serious document, and as such, should not have lengthy greetings. A very short greeting like "Dear Jacob. Hope you are doing well" should be fine.