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How Do You Write An Introduction to An Assignment? (With Examples of Assignment Introduction)

How Do You Write An Introduction to An Assignment? (With Examples of Assignment Introduction)

Whether you’re in school or college, you can’t avoid academic writing. It’s essential to write assignments to complete your course and graduate from it successfully. As a student, you must have discussed your assignments and academic writing projects with your friends, seniors, and mentors. Most assignments aim to gauge students’ knowledge about the subject and how well they express themselves while solving a problem or presenting their ideas and opinions. 

Writing an assignment introduction paves the way of how a reader or a teacher perceives an entire assignment and can be considered a face of an assignment. Our assignment help experts are here to offer you the best tips on how to write an assignment introduction.

How to introduce an assignment?

As they say – well begun is half done. Our assignment writers agree and believe in this adage. Countless times, you must have skipped a video because you didn’t find its first 5 seconds interesting or catchy enough to hold your attention. Or you must have chosen to watch a movie because you liked its trailer. Similarly, an introduction is a bait for your readers to read your assignment, report, essay, or dissertation with interest. It’s the first impression you will cast on your professors.

GoAssignmentHelp assignment assistance experts who handle hundreds of ‘ do my assignment ’ requests every month share that most students find it difficult to write an introductory paragraph that is clear and concise. Here, we will simplify the process of writing an introduction for the given assignment for you.

A good introduction to an assignment example is always one that gives a clear idea to the readers about what your assignment topic is or what are you going to talk about in the rest of the copy. An old trick is to talk about general ideas about the topic and narrow down your discussion to the specific problem or aspect of the topic you are going to discuss.

An introduction is a guide to your assignment. It should include:

  • Some background about the assignment topic, and
  • An outline of opinions and arguments you are going to present.

An assignment introduction example or two can perhaps give you a better idea of what needs to be done.

Contact our experts for a powerful introduction to your assignment!

Different Elements of the Introduction of an Assignment

Before we delve into introduction assignment examples, you must understand elements that constitute a good introduction to an assignment:

  • Importance of an assignment topic or the purpose of essay writing or dissertation writing,
  • Keywords from the essay topic or assignment question to show how well you have understood the writing task,
  • What is the proper definition of the assignment topic or the key terms it contains – and what can readers expect from the written piece,
  • Student’s reason for writing on the topic. You may get some hints on it from what your teacher mentions on the assignment list or what he/she shares in the class about it,
  • A quick bird-eye’s view of your approach on the assignment topic,
  • Key points of your discussion that you will elaborate in the body of the paper,
  • Quick discussion on previous studies, articles, news, or other works on the topic, and
  • What are some of the limitations of the topic?

You don’t have to include everything in an introduction – just enough to make your reader or teacher curious about the topic. The following example of introduction for assignment starts with a central issue, goes on to add some background, and then, presents the argument the assignment writer elaborated further in the essay. It ends with a smooth transition statement meant to transport the reader to the next part of the essay.

write introduction for an assignment- GoAssignmentHelp

How to write an introduction for a report?

When you are stuck with how to start a writing assignment, writing an introduction can solve most of your problems. Different types of assignments have different types of introductory paragraphs. The student introduction assignment example mentioned above is suitable for an essay. Now, we will see an example of an assignment introduction for a report.

write introduction for a report GoAssignmentHelp

Note that this kind of assignment introduction contains:

  • A Background: A quick mention of previous studies and articles on the topic gives your teachers a perspective on what is already known about the topic, key issues that need to be addressed, and what you are going to discuss in your report.
  • An Objective or a Thesis Statement: A hypothesis or a thesis statement is based on earlier findings and previous works on the topic. It provides a structure to your report. Check how the assignment writing service expert has mentioned the purpose of the study and a quick outline of the entailing discussion in one statement – right after the background.
  • Importance of the Study: If you’ve not already highlighted the importance of the study yet, you may include a few more lines to mention the gaps in the topic research and how your paper is going to bridge those gaps.

Consult our assignment writers for fresh ideas and introduction samples for any type of assignment!

How to write an introduction for a thesis or a dissertation?

Most students come across a dissertation or a thesis writing task in their Master’s or Ph.D. degree course. A few need to write a dissertation in their Bachelor’s degree programs. But since they are new to dissertation writing, they wonder how to write an introduction for an assignment that is much longer than a normal essay writing task they have encountered yet. The truth is that writing an introduction for a dissertation is not much different from writing an introduction for an essay or a report (depending on the nature of your dissertation topic).

You can use the points mentioned above to learn how to write a good assignment introduction longer than a paragraph. The ideal length for a dissertation introduction is 5-7% of the total length of your research paper. Most Master’s dissertations are around 15,000 to 50,000 words long – depending on the subject area. Hence, their introductions can have anywhere between 750 and 2,500 words.

We provide affordable writing services for students who find it difficult to paraphrase their ideas succinctly in an introduction. Besides the general introduction, we also help students write an introduction for each chapter, which will help you include more references throughout your research paper. It will also help research paper writers to remind their readers of the purpose of the dissertation again and to retain their interest.

You must also read :  Tips and Examples of The Conclusion Section of Assignments

Tips of Top-Rated Experts on How to Start an Assignment

Our essay writers advise students on how to write a good introduction for an assignment all the time. Besides what’s mentioned above, they also advise students to:

  • make their introduction eye-catching,
  • build up curiosity,
  • outline the arguments, and
  • maintain suspense.

Experts warn that merely stating the assignment question in other words or trying to state everything in the introduction like a summary of a story is not a good idea at all. You must follow the word limit suggested by your instructor for the assignment introduction and maintain a sharp, focused approach while penning the intro.

Need help with how to start an assignment introduction?

Introduction matters! Whether it’s a superstar or an assignment, the introduction is a key to his/its popularity. GoAssignmentHelp is a leading online assignment help service that brings you the best and most experienced assignment writers from the major cities of Canada, such as Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Winnipeg, and more. You can seek help from them for writing the best introduction for your homework , essays , dissertations , thesis , and research papers .

Looking for an assignment introduction sample? Ask our experts!

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How to Write An Assignment Introduction Like A Pro

How to Write An Assignment Introduction

Assignments become a crucial part of students’ academic lives as they have to encounter writing assignments daily. Writing an assignment in itself is a big and tough task, but most students face problems in writing an introduction for such assignments. 

An introduction has to be precise and complete to give a brief about your assignment, and there is a fixed word limit for writing an introduction of an assignment. That is why the most searched question about the assignment is 

How To Write An Assignment Introduction!

Table of Contents

If you want to make sure that your assignment’s introduction is eye-catching and précis, then follow the following guidelines on how to write an introduction for an assignment.

What is the Assignment Introduction?

The introduction gives an outline of the whole paper. It is the presentation of key ideas and also the purpose of your work. The introduction tells the readers about what you are going to tell in the assignment. An introduction has its own grading rules as it is counted distinctly from the body.

Significance of Writing Assignment Introduction

First, we need to understand the significance of writing a good introduction to an assignment. So you must have heard that the first impression is the last impression, and an introduction of your assignment works as a first impression for your assignment. 

Thus, if you wish to attract your examiner’s attention or your readers, you should write a good introduction for your assignment. Moreover, the important role of the introduction is to give an overview of the assignment, which helps the reader determine whether they want to read it.

Hence, before writing an assignment, it is very important to understand how to write an introduction of an assignment .

Strategies: How to write an assignment introduction

  • A good introduction to the assignment manifests the following strategies –
  • It must show the main objective and purpose of the assignment.
  • The importance of assignment.
  • The purview of the assignment’s study that is what it includes.
  • A brief description of the assignment’s content and its organization.

Characteristics of Good Introduction

Before knowing how to write an assignment introduction, the most crucial thing is to know the characteristics of a good introduction. Because then only you can write a good introduction. So following are the essential characteristics of a good introduction-

  • A good introduction is written precisely and clearly so that everyone can understand it. In short, there must not be any language errors.
  • It must be written while remembering that it should be attention-grabbing so that it can grab the attention of its readers.
  • A good introduction always shows the purpose of the study and what the study is about.
  • A Good Assignment should be grammatical error free and plagiarism free. It will be a wise decision to take help from AI Content Detector tool like Content at Scale’s AI detector.
  • Best Guide on How to Write a Case Study Assignment?
  • Useful Guide on How to Submit Assignment on Google Classroom
  • Handy Tips on How to Write an Assignment From Scratch

Elements: How to Write Introduction For Assignment

1.   background.

The first thing you have to write in an introduction is a brief background of the study. You have to give an overview of your assignment, what your assignment is about, its impact, and its area of study.

2.   Context in brief

You have to include a gist of the context of your assignment. It helps the readers to get information about the scope of the study in the assignment.

3.   Your Contention

You have to write your stance on the question involved in the statement. It should be limited to one statement. It will help the readers understand your stance on such points and that the assignment is based on such points.

4.   Main points of study

You will write one line on the main points of your study as it will help the readers circumscribe the assignment’s limits.

5.   Definition of the Topic

The most important step in how to write an introduction for an assignment is to write a definition of the topic of the assignment very briefly. So that readers can understand the title of the study at once.

6.   Why are you writing on this topic only

It is always suggested that you write in the introduction of an assignment why you are writing on this topic only.

7.   Outline

Write briefly about the outline or structure of the assignment so that readers can read accordingly, and also it will help you to define the scope of the assignment in short.

However, students often look for how to write assignment pdf. So, below we provide the assignment introduction pdf.

How To Write An Introduction Of An Assignment Pdf

Download this PDF of how to write an introduction on an assignment:

How Long Should An Assignment Introduction Be?

It is true that students find this question while looking for an answer on the assignment’s introduction page. Let’s state that while writing an assignment, the introduction section should not be too long. Furthermore, the context should not be more than a few pages long.

Keep your assignment’s introduction simple and readable. Replace difficult words with simpler ones to fix readability issues (if any). To save time and effort, online paraphrasing tools such as Editpad or Paraphraser can be used to paraphrase text in a simple way.

If you are writing a 2000-word assignment, the introduction should be 200-250 words long.

But if you are writing a 3000-word assignment, the introduction should be 350-400 words long.

Guidelines/Tips On How To Write An Assignment Introduction

  • Always start your assignment’s introduction with a broad idea about the topic of the assignment. After giving a broader picture of the study, you have to narrow down the discussion and write the main object of the study.
  • Don’t forget to state the significance of your assignment in brief. It is the prominent part of the introduction.
  • You have to smartly write about the tasks you are dealing with in the assignment in brief.
  • Make sure you use easy and understandable language so that readers don’t find it difficult to understand the introduction; otherwise, they will not read the other parts of the assignment as well.
  • Double-check and proofread your assignment introduction to ensure it is free from spelling mistakes and grammar mistakes.

These guidelines are very important in writing a good introduction to your assignment. If you want to be well-versed in writing an assignment introduction, it is mandatory first to be acquainted with these tips and guidelines.

Assignment Introduction Example

For more clarity, you can see the following assignment example;

best introduction for assignment

Is There Any Other Way To Write Or Get An Effective Assignment Introduction?

Yes, there is! 

It has been seen that there are several writers who are confused when it comes to the assignment’s introduction writing. And it is true that they struggle to summarise the broad issue and write an introduction without conducting sufficient research. However, because the subject experts or online assignments help provide experts who are well-versed in the field, they easily write the introduction in minutes.

  • The majority of students do not properly understand the English language. The experts who work in the writing industry have years of experience in writing assignments. That is why they always make sure to write an engaging introduction that also seems professional.
  • Furthermore, the requirements of the writer are always given priority by the professionals. After that, they write a professional article that will, without a doubt, engage the reader.
  • The expert not only helps the student in preparing the assignment’s introduction. They offer their support in completing the entire home task and guarantee that they will get an A+ grade.
  • Besides that, the professionals’ support is available 24/7/365/366 days. So you won’t have to worry about coming up with a solution for your writing task.

What Makes A Good Introduction?

As you already know that, the rules are always subject to change, and our perspectives may be different. However, the academic standards for writing an introduction are quite clear. When creating a great introduction for an assignment, you have to make sure some of the points that are given below:

  • Motivates the audience.
  • Introduces your thesis statement.
  • Defines the topic you’re talking about.
  • Emphasizes the significance of your topic.
  • Highlights the main points you want to discuss.
  • Provides your reasoning for approaching your topic.
  • Gives a high-level overview of your methodology.
  • Provides statistical information and the purpose of your methodology.

Note: Remember that even creative writing tasks require an inspiring introduction that discusses your purpose for writing.

On the other hand, writing an introduction is relatively easy. Some important things must be clear, including:

  • Your topic’s importance.
  • The goal of your paper.
  • An element of explanation.
  • A powerful opening hook sentence.
  • Include a link to your thesis statement.

Quick recap

To write an engaging assignment introduction, remember to:

  • Make their introduction interesting, 
  • outline the reasons, 
  • make the audience curious about your assignment, 
  • and keep the audience guessing.

Experts warn that rephrasing the assignment question or telling everything in the opening like a story synopsis is not a good idea. You must stick to your tutor’s specified word limit for the assignment introduction and write it with a clear, focused approach.

Since the time assignments have become a crucial part of our studies and grades, and the need to learn the concept and structure of assignments has arisen. 

An introduction is the important part of the assignment to grab readers’ attention and tell in brief about the background and information of the assignment. Thus it is very important to learn how to write assignment introductions. The introduction of an assignment should be eye-catching and alluring to capture the audience and make them read the whole assignment.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1. what are the 3 parts of an introduction paragraph.

Following are the three parts of an introduction:  1. Parts of an introduction 2. The opening statement 3. The supporting sentences 4. The introductory topic sentence.

Q2. What are the key elements of an introduction?

The introduction must have the following responsibilities: 1. Get the audience’s attention 2. Introduce the topic 3. Explain its relevance to the audience 4. State a thesis or purpose 5. Outline the main points.

Q3. How to write introduction for assignment?

A good introduction shows the reader that the essay will provide a relevant answer to the assignment question. As a result, the introduction should link back to the question. That is done by writing a paragraph that deals with all the key content mentioned in the assignment question.

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How to Write an Assignment Introduction – 6 Best Tips

In essence, the writing tasks in academic tenure students are an integral part of any curriculum. Whether in high school, college, or university, they may also address the various issues and concerns with their friends and mentors about different academic writing assignments they receive.

The main purpose of all these assignments is to recognize how you can adequately express yourself through words and how much you understand a particular subject.

An introduction is a base of an assignment. It is challenging to prepare, and many students struggle to write an assignment. 

Some students have doubts about how to write assignment introduction. The current educational system has neglected to teach this vitally necessary writing method.

The best thing about writing is that you can learn and grow all the time by practicing. In this blog, I will discover significant tips for assignment writing, which is the art of writing an assignment introduction.

If you are struggling with your assignment, then you can get top-notch assignment help online service from our experts who will help you with any type of assignment.

What Is The Introduction Section?

Table of Contents

An assignment introduction segment is a crucial piece of any task or article. It is the main area of your task. This area generally has not more than a few passages.

Why is an introduction section important?

It is a fact that your “ first impression is your last impression .” So, if you write a good introduction to your assignment, you catch your examiner’s eye and get good grades.

The primary purpose of the introductory paragraph is to give the readers a real understanding of the topic of your assignment. The introduction gives the subject a generalization until the author narrows the discussion.

It is just like your assignment guide. It also provides context information regarding the assignment topic and an outline of your view or claim.

You can understand it more deeply if you go through some introduction examples. It gives the reader an overview of your essay and what it’s all about. 

Assignment help

What Are The Characteristics Of A Good Introduction?

  • Ensure your writing is clear and precise, and there must be no language errors.
  • The introduction section should be attention-grabbing to browse and attracts the reader to continue reading the rest of the assignment.
  • The introduction should tell the reader what the full assignment is all concerning.

Still, Need help with your assignments writing? Click the banner above & get a free quote for your assignments.

Hope that you find this information useful. Happy learning, and best of luck with your assignment.

If you need any type of help regarding your assignments, contact us & get affordable assignment help .

Points To Remember Before Write Assignment Introduction

Before you searching the answer to your question about how to write an assignment introduction, you must keep these things in mind before writing it:

Proper introduction for a process documentation creates your experience a lot easier. It frees you from evaluating whether readers would be excited to continue your work. If you want to attract more readers, keep a few parameters before creating the introduction section It is a strong recommendation for the serious writers to take help from AI Content Detector Tools which are much efficient to secure your website ranking factor. You have a choice to check the best solution on Originality.AI in this regard.

1. Understand Your Readers 

To present a valid assignment to your audience, you must use audience-centric language rather than writer-centric. Ask yourself what the audience needs to understand from your writing. Are your audience expected to have an emotional reply to your writing? What do you need the audience to act, think, or feel about it? No matter how well-educated, we all bear the challenge of getting into someone’s shoes. Audience information is one of the keys to efficient completion.

2. Think About The Good Ideas

The thesis statement is your essay’s most significant sentence. So you’ve got to work over and over to get it accurate. Get assured you explain the research question acutely while writing your thesis statement. In the sentence of the thesis statement, your point of view should be clear. Avoid a lengthy, wordy, and complex statement of the thesis.

3. Avoid Explanation

Don’t try to explain anything to make your argument in the introduction section. You should drop the information part to the principal body. Just mention the primary points of the argument you plan to make later in the assignment. This point is important while searching for how to write an assignment introduction, as the introduction must be written in brief only.

4. Volume Matters

There is no doubt that the duration of the introduction depends on the subject, the format of the assignment, and the research work. However, it will be written in one paragraph. 

Remember that your introductory section should be more or less half a page long so that the audience can finish it one day. The introduction should be one-tenth of the entire assignment.

  • The introduction must be 200-250 words when writing a 2000 words assignment.
  • The introduction must be 350-400 words when writing a 3000 words assignment.

5. Don’t Act In The Dark

None of this comes as a surprise in academic writing. Academic writing is unlike writing fiction, where you can keep the audience in suspense. The entire assignment should be outlined in the introduction in academic literature, followed by a description in the central body. The following points will comprise an overview,

a. Related background data 

b. A Map of Essay 

c. A Sentence of Thesis

d. Your opinion.

Note: This is the rule for writing an introduction in the assignment. But there is no fast and robust rule for introduction writing. You need to be careful about the criteria you need to fulfill. Nevertheless, the above suggestions certainly will enable you to write a useful introduction. 

6 Tips For How To Write An Assignment Introduction?

These are the following tips and tricks to write assignment introduction.

6 Tips For How To Write An Assignment Introduction

Tip 1:- Try to Find A Good Idea To Write An Assignments

Your whole assignment should often be based on the assignment question’s answer, and the introduction is the first step of your assignment. Your direct response to your question on the assignment is your idea statement that should be involved in your introduction. Your assignment problem often starts with a large view and narrows down to some topic field. You should follow assignmentguru.com for an identical pattern while writing the introduction. Begin with a broad picture to attract readers, then give the readers particular information to engage in more reading.

Tip 2:- Choose Specific And General Perspectives

Remember, the subject needs an effective ‘big opening.’ For instance, an opening sentence that explains, ‘Human beings are capable of learning more than any other entity on earth’ would not be appropriate for the subject of ‘work and study.’ In another instance, the opening statement does not provide a world perspective in an assignment focusing on the city or state. So when you think about how to write an assignment introduction, you must take care of the opening statement as the success of the assignment introduction depends on it.

Tip 3:- Try To Write Assignment Introduction At The Beginning 

The best method to write assignment introduction is to write it at the beginning. The explanation for this is very clear when you write the introduction, you may have an indefinite view of the key points of the argument. Yet when you finish the material, you have good ideas about what you’ve written in your writing so far. When you follow all the rules, first write all of your proof and, finally, the introduction. Please ensure that your facts, conclusion, and introduction represent the claim you plan to bring forward.

Tip 4:- Use Creativity As An Opportunity

Don’t be scared to make and alter an experimental introduction in the first as you proceed with the subject. Writing an introduction is often the most challenging for any student since this is the first thing readers can search for. All you should do is write a normal introduction to get the work started. Complete the task, return to the introduction section again, and thoroughly review it. If rewriting is required, do not hesitate to do so.

Tip 5:- Give Earlier Attention To All Sentences

You may start with a quotation, short story, analogy, or even subject-related statistics. Create a strong impression on the audience by making that relevant information accessible. This is the point of thinking outside the box and using new skills. The reader won’t want to read the truth they already know. Uniquely, you need to find specific ways of expressing details or opinions. The students who want to know how to write an assignment introduction are searching for a unique way and methods to write it.

Tip 6:- Be Optimistic

Avoid phrases like “I will address about- in this article. Such sentences are of no concern to the reader’s mind. First of all, you need to leap in confidence in your story. Readers will find it hard to connect when you don’t believe in your content. So be sure of what you’re writing; only the readers will be involved in more reading.

  • The purpose and objectives of your assignment .
  • Why this assignment task is valuable?
  • The scope of the assignment or what the assignment covers.
  • A brief description of the organization of the assignment content.

All the above strategies help you in writing an effective and engaging introduction.

What Are The Most Common Strategies To Write Assignment Introduction?

These are the following most common strategies for writing assignment introductions. 

  • Start with a board idea about the topic. After that, narrow down the discussion to the area you focus on in your assignment. We also need to explain why this assignment is useful and important.
  • Then briefly discuss the tasks to be tackled, which usually includes the objectives and purpose of an assignment.
  • Finally, give the reader a brief preview of your homework, which you will include in subsequent sections.

What Are The Elements Important To Write Assignment Introduction?

Here the following elements are crucial to write an assignment introduction. 

  • The first and foremost most important element to writing the school or college assignment is the brief background of the study. 
  • Apart from this, you need to add the context of your assignment in the introduction.
  • Also, the other major elements to writing an assignment introduction are adding the contention, major points to study, the definition of the topic, why you are writing on this topic only, giving an outline, etc. 

Assignment Introduction Examples

These are the following assignment introduction examples;

Assignment Introduction Examples

Quick links

  • How To Attach Assignment In Google Classroom
  • How To Make An Assignment On MS Word With Easy Steps

Conclusion (Write Assignment Introduction)

From the above discussion, now you get the answer to your question, “how to write an assignment introduction.” All the above strategies and points help you in improving your writing. We hope that you find this information useful. Happy learning, and best of luck with your assignment.

If you need any help regarding your assignments, then you can contact CallTutors.

Frequently Asked Questions

What do you say in a quick introduction.

The personal introductions should include the name, expected graduation date, major career goals, experience in projects, internship, co-op, etc.

How To Start An Assignment Introduction?

Follow these steps to start a good assignment introduction :

1. Define the main purpose of writing 2. Discuss the problems and try to solve them  3. What will be the tone and style of writing?

How Long Should An Assignment Introduction Be?

The introduction for the assignment should be three to five sentences long or 50-80 words.

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Grad Coach

How To Write A Solid Assignment Introduction

By: Derek Jansen | December 2017

Henley MBA Introduction Chapter

I’ll kick off this post by making a bold assertion:

The introduction chapter of your assignment is the single most important section in your entire assignment.

Yip. Not the analysis chapter. Not the recommendations chapter. The introduction chapter. Yip, that short 200/300/400-word chapter that so many students rush through to get to the meatier chapters.  Why do I say this? There are a few reasons:

It creates the first impression.

Apart from the executive summary (which some assignments don’t have), the introduction creates the very first impression on your marker. It sets the tone in terms of the quality of the assignment.

It introduces your industry.

You might have decades of experience in your industry – but your marker won’t. This means that the simplest concepts can be misunderstood (and thereby cost you marks) if not explained right at the beginning of your assignment. A good introduction lays the foundation so that the marker can understand your upcoming arguments.

It defines and justifies your topic.

The introduction, if developed correctly, clearly outlines what the assignment will be about (and what it won’t) and why that’s important (i.e. a justification). In other words, it makes it clear what the focus of the assignment will be about, and why that is worth investigating. This clarity and justification of the topic are essential to earning good marks and keeping you focused on the purpose of the assignment.

It clarifies your approach.

Beyond the what and why, a good introduction also briefly explains how you’ll approach the research, both from a theoretical and practical perspective. This lays a clear roadmap both for the marker and for yourself. For the marker, this improves the readability and digestibility of the document (which is essential for earning marks). And for you, this big-picture view of the approach keeps you from digressing into a useless analysis.

In short, a good introduction lays a solid foundation and a clear direction for the rest of your assignment. Hopefully, you’re convinced…

Henley MBA Help

The 5 essential ingredients.

In this post, I’ll outline the key components of a strong introduction chapter/section. But first, I want to discuss the structure.

Some assignment briefs will provide a proposed structure which combines the introduction and analysis chapters. I always encourage my clients to split this up into two chapters, as it provides a clearer, more logical structure. You’ll see why once I discuss the core components.

#1 – The Four Ws

A logical starting point is to assume the marker knows nothing about your business . Make sure you cover the basics:

  • Who – what is the name of the business? If its multiple words, you should take the opportunity to introduce an acronym here. Then, stick to the acronym throughout the rest of the assignment. It’s also good practice to provide a list of acronyms in the appendix.
  • What – explain what the business does, in simple English. Avoid industry jargon and explain the basic operating model of the business.
  • Where – explain where the business operates from and where its customers operate. If you have multiple offices and serve multiple markets, a visual representation can save you some words.
  • When – mention the age of the business, and how many staff it employs. You can also note the ownership structure (private company, listed entity, JV, etc).

If you’re only going to focus on one country/branch/department, make mention of this now. Also, be sure to justify why you’re focusing on that (for example, due to limited access to data).

If done right, you will have now painted a very clear (but concise) picture of the organisation for the marker. The next step is to discuss the context that the business operates in.

#2 – A brief discussion of the context.

Now that you’ve introduced the business, you need to move towards identifying the key issue(s) that will form the focus of the assignment. To do this, you need to lay a context, which will then lead to the issue(s). This will vary between assignments, and could be something like:

  • The entry of new competitors resulting in reduced market share (STR, SM)
  • A merger leading to a culture clash and poor performance (MP)
  • A corporate scandal resulting in reputation damage (R&R)
  • Changing regulation leading to the opening of a new potential country market (IB)

In other words, you need to present a (brief) story of how the key issue(s) or opportunity has arisen – X has lead to Y, which caused Z.

#3 – Identification of the key issue and research question(s).

With the context set, you need to clearly state what the key issue(s) or opportunity is, and why this is worth investigating (for example, due to the financial impact if left unresolved). This is pretty straightforward, but it is a critical step often missed by students, and results in the marker questioning the quality of the entire assignment.

With the key issue identified, its time to lay out your research question(s). In other words, state in question format, what question(s) your assignment will seek to answer.

For example:

  • “What has changed in Organisation X’s competitive context, and how should it best respond to ensure sustainable competitive advantage?”
  • “Should Organisation X internationalise to Country Y?”
  • “What segments exist within Industry X and which segment should Organisation Y target?”
  • “Which digital business model should Organisation X adopt?”

By stating your research question(s) up front, you are providing a very clear, focused direction for your assignment, thereby reducing your risk of getting distracted by the shiny objects that will invariably pop up along the way. You are stating clearly what you will and won’t focus on, and ring-fencing the assignment to a manageable breadth. This is critically important for earning marks, as it allows you to go deep into a highly relevant set of theories and develop meaningful insights, rather than superficially fluttering with numerous less-relevant ones.

What’s critically important is that you achieve alignment between the context, the issue(s) and the research question(s). They should all flow in a logical fashion, as shown below. 

best introduction for assignment

If you achieve this alignment, you have a rock-solid foundation for your assignment, and your marker will be crystal clear regarding your direction, and why you chose that direction.

#4 – A brief outline of your theoretical approach.

Now that you’ve made it clear what your assignment is aiming to achieve (i.e. what research question(s) it wants to answer), it is very good practice to briefly mention:

  • How you will approach the analysis.
  • What key theory you will draw on.

In other words, you should give the marker an indication of how you approached the analysis, and on what theoretical basis. For example:

“The report begins by briefly looking at the organisation’s broader strategy, as well as values using Schwartz’s model (1994). It then reviews stakeholders using Mitchell et al.’s framework (1997) and identifies a key group with which reputation needs to be managed to achieve strategic alignment. It then analyses antecedents, reputation, and outcomes of the said group using Money et al.’s (2012) RELATE framework. This is followed by proposed strategic actions.”

As you can see, this excerpt clearly outlines how the analysis was approached, and what key theory was used in the relevant sections. This gives the marker a big-picture view of the assignment, which aids the digestibility of the document.

#5 – A brief outline of your fieldwork.

Now that you’ve communicated the approach, structure and underpinning theory, it’s best practice to make a quick mention of your fieldwork. Yes, you’re typically supposed to collect some primary data (for example, undertake some semi-structured interviews or a survey), as well as secondary data (for example, review industry reports, company data, etc), for your assignments – especially in Stage 2 and 3 of the program. 

In this final section, you should very briefly outline what you did in this respect so that the marker can rest assured that your assignment is not an opinion piece. A quality assignment draws on multiple data sources to make well-informed, data-backed arguments. Show that you’ve done this, and be sure to refer the reader to the appendices for evidence of this work (for example, interview transcripts, survey results, etc.).

Lastly, make mention of your relationship with the business, and your broad responsibilities. Remember to keep this in third-person language. For example:

“The author is employed as the [INSERT YOUR TITLE] and is responsible for X, Y and Z.”

Let’s recap.

In this article, I’ve hopefully convinced you of the critical importance of writing a strong introduction chapter. I’ve also presented 5 essential ingredients that you should bake into your intro in every assignment. By incorporating these ingredients (ideally, in this order), you will set the foundation for a strong assignment.

To recap the 5 essentials:

  • A (plain language) explanation of the organisation.
  • A brief discussion of the context.
  • Identification of the key issue and research question(s).
  • A brief outline of your theoretical approach.
  • A brief outline of your fieldwork and your professional position.

You Might Also Like:

Dissertation introduction writing: 7 mistakes

Informative and easy to apply advice…tx D

Derek Jansen

You’re welcome, Rishen 🙂

Tara

It is a very useful and understandable explanation of writing a research paper. Thank you so much for the sharing free such a useful example.

Yours sincerely Tara

Paul Murphy

This is really good, thank you.

Thanks for the feedback, Paul. Best of luck with your Henley MBA.

Vin

Very useful guide for the MBA. You mention that it’s good practice to use a range of sources to support arguments. If an assignment task isn’t that strategic (e.g. reviewing a process for a particular team within the business), can the assignment be supported purely by ‘fieldwork’ and models/theory? Thank you.

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best introduction for assignment

Awesome Guide on How to Write an Essay Introduction

best introduction for assignment

'I'd like to recall the day I nearly burned myself in flames in my automobile while going 250 mph and escaping the police'. – Thankfully, we don't have a story like that to relate to, but we bet we piqued your interest.

That's what we refer to as an efficient hook. Fundamentally, it's an attention-grabbing first sentence that piques an audience's interest and encourages them to keep reading. While writing an essay, a strong hook in essay introductions is essential.

Delve into the article if you're wondering how to start an essay with a strong introduction. This is the ultimate guide for writing the parts of a introduction paragraph from our custom dissertation writing service to engage your readers.

Introduction Definition

The introduction paragraph, to put it simply, is the first section of an essay. Thus, when reading your essay, the reader will notice it right away. What is the goal of an opening paragraph? There are two things that an excellent introduction achieves. It initially informs the reader on the subject of your work; in other words, it should describe the essay's topic and provide some background information for its main point. It must also spark readers' interest and persuade them to read the remainder of your article.

To provide you with essay writing services , we only need your paper requirements to create a plagiarism-free paper on time.

How Long Should an Introduction Be

Typically, there are no strict restrictions on how long an opening paragraph should be. Professional essay writers often shape the size of it with the paper's total length in mind. For instance, if you wonder how to make introduction in essay with five paragraphs, keep your introductory sentence brief and fit it inside a single section. But, if you're writing a longer paper, let's say one that's 40 pages, your introduction could need many paragraphs or even be pages long.

Although there are no specific requirements, seasoned writers advise that your introduction paragraph should account for 8% to 9% of your essay's overall word length.

And, if you place an order on our coursework writing services , we will certainly comply with your introduction length requirements.

What Makes a Good Introduction

All of the following criteria should be fulfilled by a strong opening sentence:

  • Start your introduction on an essay with a catchy sentence that draws the reader in.
  • It needs to include baseline information about your subject.
  • This should give readers a sense of the main argument(s) that your essay will address.
  • It must include all necessary information on the setting, locations, and chronological events.
  • By the end of your introduction, make a precise remark that serves as your essay's thesis.

What Are the 3 Parts of an Introduction Paragraph

So, what should be in a introduction paragraph? The introduction format essay has three sections: a hook, connections, and a thesis statement. Let's examine each component in more depth.

What Are the 3 Parts of an Introduction Paragraph

Part 1: Essay Hook

A hook is among the most effective parts of a introduction paragraph to start an essay. A strong hook will always engage the reader in only one sentence. In other words, it is a selling point.

Let's now address the query, 'how to make an essay introduction hook interesting?'. Well, to create a powerful hook, you can employ a variety of techniques:

  • A shocking fact
  • An anecdote 
  • A short summary

And here is what to avoid when using a hook:

  • Dictionary definitions
  • Generalizations
  • Sweeping statements that include words like 'everywhere,' 'always,' etc.

Once you've established a strong hook, you should give a general outline of your major point and some background information on the subject of your paper. If you're unsure how to write an introduction opening, the ideal approach is to describe your issue briefly before directing readers to particular areas. Simply put, you need to give some context before gradually getting more specific with your opinions.

The 5 Types of Hooks for Writing

Apart from the strategies mentioned above, there are even more types of hooks that can be used:

  • A Common Misconception — a good trick, to begin with, to claim that something your readers believe in is false.

Example: 'Although many falsely believe that people working from home are less productive – employees who get such work-life benefits generally work harder.'

  • Statistics — Statistical facts may provide a great hook for argumentative essays and serious subjects focusing on statistics.

Example: 'A recent study showed that people who are satisfied with their work-life balance work 21% harder and are 33% more likely to stay at the same company.'

  • Personal Story — sometimes, personal stories can be an appropriate hook, but only if they fit into a few brief sentences (for example, in narrative essays).

Example: 'When I had my first work-from-home experience, I suddenly realized the importance of having a good work-life balance; I saw plenty of the benefits it can provide.'

  • Scenes — this type of hook requires making the readers imagine the things you are writing about. It is most suitable when used in descriptive and narrative essays.

Example: 'Imagine you could have as much free time as you wish by working or studying from home—and spend more time with your loved ones.'

  • Thesis Statement — when unsure how to do an essay introduction, some writers start directly with their thesis statement. The main trick here is that there is no trick.

Example: 'I strongly believe there is a direct correlation between a healthy work-life balance and productivity in school or at work.'

Part 2: Connections

Give readers a clearer sense of what you will discuss throughout your article once you have given a hook and relevant background information about your essay topic. Briefly mentioning your main points in the same sequence in which you will address them in your body paragraphs can help your readers progressively arrive at your thesis statement.

In this section of your introduction, you should primarily address the following questions:

You may make sure that you are giving your readers all the information they need to understand the subject of your essay by responding to each of these questions in two to three lines. Be careful to make these statements brief and to the point, though.

Your main goal is gradually moving from general to specific facts about your subject or thesis statement. Visualize your introduction as an upside-down triangle to simplify the essay writing process. The attention-grabbing element is at the top of this triangle, followed by a more detailed description of the subject and concluding with a highly precise claim. Here is some quick advice on how to use the 'upside-down triangle' structure to compose an essay introduction:

  • Ensure that each subsequent line in your introduction is more focused and precise. This simple method will help you progressively introduce the main material of your piece to your audience.
  • Consider that you are writing a paper on the value of maintaining a healthy work-life balance. In this situation, you may start with a query like, 'Have you ever considered how a healthy work-life balance can affect other areas of your life?' or a similar hook. Next, you could proceed by giving broad factual information. Finally, you could focus your topic on fitting your thesis statement.

Part 3: The Thesis Statement

If you're unsure of the ideal method to create an introduction, you should be particularly attentive to how you phrase your thesis statement.

The thesis of your work is, without a doubt, the most crucial section. Given that the thesis statement of your piece serves as the foundation for the entire essay, it must be presented in the introduction. A thesis statement provides readers with a brief summary of the article's key point. Your main assertion is what you'll be defending or disputing in the body of your essay. An effective thesis statement is often one sentence long, accurate, exact, unambiguous, and focused. Your thesis should often be provided at the end of your introduction.

Here is an example thesis statement for an essay about the value of a proper work-life balance to help you gain a better understanding of what a good thesis should be:

Thesis Statement Example: 'Creating flexible and pleasant work schedules for employees can help them have a better work-life balance while also increasing overall performance.'

Catchy Introductions for Different Essay Types

Although opening paragraphs typically have a fixed form, their language may vary. In terms of academic essays, students are often expected to produce four primary intro to essay examples. They include articles that are analytical, argumentative, personal, and narrative. It is assumed that different information should appear in these beginning paragraphs since the goals of each sort of essay change. A thorough overview of the various paper kinds is provided below, along with some good essay introduction samples from our argumentative essay writers:

Narrative Introduction

  • The writer of a narrative essay must convey a story in this style of writing. Such essays communicate a story, which distinguishes them from other essay types in a big way.
  • Such a paper's hook will often be an enticing glimpse into a specific scene that only loosely links to the thesis statement. Additionally, when writing such an essay, a writer should ensure that every claim included in the introduction relates to some important moments that have significantly impacted the story's outcome.
  • The thesis in narrative writing is usually the theme or main lesson learned from the story.
Narrative introduction example: 'My phone rang, and my mother told me that Dad had suffered a heart attack. I suddenly experienced a sense of being lifted out from under me by this immaculately carpeted flooring. After making it through, Dad left me with a sizable collection of lessons. Here are three principles that I know dad would have wanted me to uphold...'

Still Can't Think of a Perfect Intro?

When assigned to write an essay, students end up with a ton of questions, including 'How to structure an essay?', 'How to choose a good topic?'. Here at EssayPro, we employ only the best essay writers who are committed to students’ success.

Analytical Introduction

  • Analytical essay introduction format is another popular type. In contrast to a narrative paper, an analytical paper seeks to explore an idea and educate the reader about a topic.
  • Three important facts that support the analytical premise should be included in the middle section of the introduction.
  • A well-researched and well-thought-out claim will form a wonderful thesis because the main goal of this paper is to study the topic and educate readers. It's crucial to remember that this assertion shouldn't initially have any real weight. Although it will still be theoretical, it has to be articulated practically.
Analytical introduction example: “... Hence even though presidents, CEOs, and generals still have their daily schedules full of economic crises and military conflicts, on the cosmic scale of history humankind can lift its eyes up and start looking towards new horizons. If we bring famine, plague, and war under control, what will replace them at the top of the human agenda? Like firefighters in a world without fire, so humankind in the twenty-first century needs to ask itself an unprecedented question: what are we going to do with ourselves? What will demand our attention and ingenuity in a healthy, prosperous, and harmonious world? In a healthy, prosperous, and harmonious world, what will demand our attention and ingenuity? This question becomes doubly urgent given the immense new powers that biotechnology and information technology are providing us with. What will we do with all that power? ...” Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, Yuval Noah Harari

Persuasive Introduction

  • To persuade readers of anything is the sole goal of persuasive essay writing. This may be accomplished using persuasive strategies like ethos, pathos, and logos.
  • A hook statement for this paper may be anything from a fascinating fact to even comedy. You can use whatever technique you choose. The most crucial advice is to ensure your hook is in line with your thesis and that it can bolster further justifications.
  • Generally speaking, a persuasive essay must include three supporting facts. Hence, to gradually lead readers to the major topic of your paper, add a quick summary of your three arguments in your introduction.
  • Last, the thesis statement should be the main claim you will be disputing in this paper. It should be a brief, carefully thought-out, and confident statement of your essay's major argument.
Persuasive introduction example: 'Recycling waste helps to protect the climate. Besides cleaning the environment, it uses waste materials to create valuable items. Recycling initiatives must be running all around the world. ...'

Personal Introduction

  • The final sort of academic writing that students frequently encounter is a personal essay. In principle, this essay style is creative nonfiction and requires the author to reflect on personal experiences. The goals of such a paper may be to convey a story, discuss the lessons that certain incidents have taught you, etc. This type of writing is unique since it is the most personal.
  • Whatever topic you choose can serve as the hook for such an essay. A pertinent remark, query, joke, or fact about the primary plot or anything else will be acceptable. The backdrop of your narrative should then be briefly explained after that. Lastly, a thesis statement can describe the impact of particular experiences on you and what you learned.
Personal introduction example: 'My parents always pushed me to excel in school and pursue new interests like playing the saxophone and other instruments. I felt obligated to lead my life in a way that met their standards. Success was always expected on the route they had set out for me. Yet eight years after my parents' separation, this course was diverted when my dad relocated to California...'

Tips for Writing a Winning Introduction Paragraph

You now understand how to do introduction and have specific intro example for essays to help you get going. Let's quickly examine what you should and shouldn't do during the writing process.

  • Keep the assignment's purpose in mind when you write your introduction, and ensure it complies with your instructor's requirements.
  • Use a compelling and relevant hook to grab the reader's attention immediately.
  • Make sure your readers understand your perspective to make it apparent.
  • If necessary, establish key terms related to your subject.
  • Show off your expertise on the subject.
  • Provide a symbolic road map to help readers understand what you discuss throughout the post.
  • Be brief; it's recommended that your introduction make up no more than 8 to 9 percent of the entire text (for example, 200 words for a 2500 words essay).
  • Construct a strong thesis statement.
  • Create some intrigue.
  • Make sure there is a clear and smooth transition from your introduction to the body of your piece.
  • If you're looking for a custom writer , request assistance from the EssayPro team. We know how to write a term paper along with many other types of essays.

Don'ts

  • Provide too much background information.
  • Use sentences that are off-topic or unnecessary.
  • Make your opening paragraph excessively long.
  • Keep some information a secret and reveal it later in conclusion.
  • Employ overused phrases or generalizations.
  • Using quotation marks excessively

Now that you know what is in the introduction of an essay, we recommend reading the information on how to critique an article to gain more academic insight.

If you are still struggling with that, keep in mind that you can always send us your request to get professional assistance from our law essay writing service .

Get Help With Your ESSAY INTRO!

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thesis statement

The introduction to an academic essay will generally present an analytical question or problem and then offer an answer to that question (the thesis).

Your introduction is also your opportunity to explain to your readers what your essay is about and why they should be interested in reading it. You don’t have to “hook” your readers with a dramatic promise (every other discussion of the topic you’re writing about is completely wrong!) or an exciting fact (the moon can reach 127 degrees Celsius!). Instead, you should use your introduction to explain to your readers why your essay is going to be interesting to read. To do this, you’ll need to frame the question or problem that you’re writing about and explain why this question or problem is important. If you make a convincing case for why your question or problem is worth solving, your readers will be interested in reading on.

While some of the conventions for writing an introduction vary by discipline, a strong introduction for any paper will contain some common elements. You can see these common elements in the sample introductions on this page . In general, your introductions should contain the following elements:

  • Orienting Information When you’re writing an essay, it’s helpful to think about what your reader needs to know in order to follow your argument. Your introduction should include enough information so that readers can understand the context for your thesis. For example, if you are analyzing someone else’s argument, you will need to identify that argument and possibly summarize its key points. If you are joining a scholarly conversation about education reform, you will need to provide context for this conversation before explaining what your essay adds to the discussion. But you don’t necessarily have to summarize your sources in detail in your introduction; that information may fit in better later in your essay. When you’re deciding how much context or background information to provide, it can be helpful to think about that information in relation to your thesis. You don’t have to tell readers everything they will need to know to understand your entire essay right away. You just need to give them enough information to be able to understand and appreciate your thesis. For some assignments, you’ll be able to assume that your audience has also read the sources you are analyzing. But even in those cases, you should still offer enough information for readers to know which parts of a source you are talking about. When you’re writing a paper based on your own research, you will need to provide more context about the sources you’re going to discuss. If you’re not sure how much you can assume your audience knows, you should consult your instructor.

An explanation of what’s at stake in your essay, or why anyone would need to read an essay that argues this thesis You will know why your essay is worth writing if you are trying to answer a question that doesn’t have an obvious answer; to propose a solution to a problem without one obvious solution; or to point out something that others may not have noticed that changes the way we consider a phenomenon, source, or idea. In all of these cases, you will be trying to understand something that you think is valuable to understand. But it’s not enough that you know why your essay is worth reading; you also need to explain to your readers why they should care about reading an essay that argues your thesis.

In other words, part of the role of an introduction is to explain to your reader what is at stake in your argument. As you draft your introduction, it can be helpful to think about how you arrived at your thesis and to take your reader through a shortened version of that process by framing the question or problem that you are trying to answer and explaining why it’s worth exploring. It’s not enough to explain why the topic you’re writing about matters; rather, you need to explain what your essay adds to that discussion. So, for example, if you were writing an essay about the Supreme Court decision in Dobbs vs. Jackson Women’s Health, it wouldn’t be enough to say that what’s at stake is that “people care about reproductive rights.” That would explain why, in general, someone might want to read about this topic. But your readers need to know why your thesis is worth arguing. Does it challenge an accepted view? Does it present a new way of considering a concept? Does it put the Supreme Court decision into a historical context in a way that is unusual or surprising?

  • Your thesis This is what you’re arguing in your essay.  

Tips for writing introductions 

  • If you are writing in a new discipline, you should always make sure to ask about conventions and expectations for introductions, just as you would for any other aspect of the essay. For example, while it may be acceptable to write a two-paragraph (or longer) introduction for your papers in some courses, instructors in other disciplines, such as those in some Government courses, may expect a shorter introduction that includes a preview of the argument that will follow.  
  • In some disciplines (Government, Economics, and others), it’s common to offer an overview in the introduction of what points you will make in your essay. In other disciplines, you will not be expected to provide this overview in your introduction.  
  • Avoid writing a very general opening sentence. While it may be true that “Since the dawn of time, people have been telling love stories,” it won’t help you explain what’s interesting about your topic.  
  • Avoid writing a “funnel” introduction in which you begin with a very broad statement about a topic and move to a narrow statement about that topic. Broad generalizations about a topic will not add to your readers’ understanding of your specific essay topic.  
  • Avoid beginning with a dictionary definition of a term or concept you will be writing about. If the concept is complicated or unfamiliar to your readers, you will need to define it in detail later in your essay. If it’s not complicated, you can assume your readers already know the definition.  
  • Avoid offering too much detail in your introduction that a reader could better understand later in the paper.
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It’s the roadmap to your essay, it’s the forecast for your argument, it’s...your introduction paragraph, and writing one can feel pretty intimidating. The introduction paragraph is a part of just about every kind of academic writing , from persuasive essays to research papers. But that doesn’t mean writing one is easy!

If trying to write an intro paragraph makes you feel like a Muggle trying to do magic, trust us: you aren’t alone. But there are some tips and tricks that can make the process easier—and that’s where we come in. 

In this article, we’re going to explain how to write a captivating intro paragraph by covering the following info:  

  • A discussion of what an introduction paragraph is and its purpose in an essay
  • An overview of the most effective introduction paragraph format, with explanations of the three main parts of an intro paragraph
  • An analysis of real intro paragraph examples, with a discussion of what works and what doesn’t
  • A list of four top tips on how to write an introduction paragraph

Are you ready? Let’s begin!

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What Is an Introduction Paragraph? 

An introduction paragraph is the first paragraph of an essay , paper, or other type of academic writing. Argumentative essays , book reports, research papers, and even personal  essays are common types of writing that require an introduction paragraph. Whether you’re writing a research paper for a science course or an argumentative essay for English class , you’re going to have to write an intro paragraph. 

So what’s the purpose of an intro paragraph? As a reader’s first impression of your essay, the intro paragraph should introduce the topic of your paper. 

Your introduction will also state any claims, questions, or issues that your paper will focus on. This is commonly known as your paper’s thesis . This condenses the overall point of your paper into one or two short sentences that your reader can come back and reference later.

But intro paragraphs need to do a bit more than just introduce your topic. An intro paragraph is also supposed to grab your reader’s attention. The intro paragraph is your chance to provide just enough info and intrigue to make your reader say, “Hey, this topic sounds interesting. I think I’ll keep reading this essay!” That can help your essay stand out from the crowd.

In most cases, an intro paragraph will be relatively short. A good intro will be clear, brief, purposeful, and focused. While there are some exceptions to this rule, it’s common for intro paragraphs to consist of three to five sentences . 

Effectively introducing your essay’s topic, purpose, and getting your reader invested in your essay sounds like a lot to ask from one little paragraph, huh? In the next section, we’ll demystify the intro paragraph format by breaking it down into its core parts . When you learn how to approach each part of an intro, writing one won’t seem so scary!

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Once you figure out the three parts of an intro paragraph, writing one will be a piece of cake!

The 3 Main Parts of an Intro Paragraph

In general, an intro paragraph is going to have three main parts: a hook, context, and a thesis statement . Each of these pieces of the intro plays a key role in acquainting the reader with the topic and purpose of your essay. 

Below, we’ll explain how to start an introduction paragraph by writing an effective hook, providing context, and crafting a thesis statement. When you put these elements together, you’ll have an intro paragraph that does a great job of making a great first impression on your audience!

Intro Paragraph Part 1: The Hook

When it comes to how to start an introduction paragraph, o ne of the most common approaches is to start with something called a hook. 

What does hook mean here, though? Think of it this way: it’s like when you start a new Netflix series: you look up a few hours (and a few episodes) later and you say, “Whoa. I guess I must be hooked on this show!” 

That’s how the hook is supposed to work in an intro paragrap h: it should get your reader interested enough that they don’t want to press the proverbial “pause” button while they’re reading it . In other words, a hook is designed to grab your reader’s attention and keep them reading your essay! 

This means that the hook comes first in the intro paragraph format—it’ll be the opening sentence of your intro. 

It’s important to realize  that there are many different ways to write a good hook. But generally speaking, hooks must include these two things: what your topic is, and the angle you’re taking on that topic in your essay. 

One approach to writing a hook that works is starting with a general, but interesting, statement on your topic. In this type of hook, you’re trying to provide a broad introduction to your topic and your angle on the topic in an engaging way . 

For example, if you’re writing an essay about the role of the government in the American healthcare system, your hook might look something like this: 

There's a growing movement to require that the federal government provide affordable, effective healthcare for all Americans. 

This hook introduces the essay topic in a broad way (government and healthcare) by presenting a general statement on the topic. But the assumption presented in the hook can also be seen as controversial, which gets readers interested in learning more about what the writer—and the essay—has to say.

In other words, the statement above fulfills the goals of a good hook: it’s intriguing and provides a general introduction to the essay topic.

Intro Paragraph Part 2: Context

Once you’ve provided an attention-grabbing hook, you’ll want to give more context about your essay topic. Context refers to additional details that reveal the specific focus of your paper. So, whereas the hook provides a general introduction to your topic, context starts helping readers understand what exactly you’re going to be writing about

You can include anywhere from one to several sentences of context in your intro, depending on your teacher’s expectations, the length of your paper, and complexity of your topic. In these context-providing sentences, you want to begin narrowing the focus of your intro. You can do this by describing a specific issue or question about your topic that you’ll address in your essay. It also helps readers start to understand why the topic you’re writing about matters and why they should read about it. 

So, what counts as context for an intro paragraph? Context can be any important details or descriptions that provide background on existing perspectives, common cultural attitudes, or a specific situation or controversy relating to your essay topic. The context you include should acquaint your reader with the issues, questions, or events that motivated you to write an essay on your topic...and that your reader should know in order to understand your thesis. 

For instance, if you’re writing an essay analyzing the consequences of sexism in Hollywood, the context you include after your hook might make reference to the #metoo and #timesup movements that have generated public support for victims of sexual harassment. 

The key takeaway here is that context establishes why you’re addressing your topic and what makes it important. It also sets you up for success on the final piece of an intro paragraph: the thesis statement.

Elle Woods' statement offers a specific point of view on the topic of murder...which means it could serve as a pretty decent thesis statement!

Intro Paragraph Part 3: The Thesis

The final key part of how to write an intro paragraph is the thesis statement. The thesis statement is the backbone of your introduction: it conveys your argument or point of view on your topic in a clear, concise, and compelling way . The thesis is usually the last sentence of your intro paragraph. 

Whether it’s making a claim, outlining key points, or stating a hypothesis, your thesis statement will tell your reader exactly what idea(s) are going to be addressed in your essay. A good thesis statement will be clear, straightforward, and highlight the overall point you’re trying to make.

Some instructors also ask students to include an essay map as part of their thesis. An essay map is a section that outlines the major topics a paper will address. So for instance, say you’re writing a paper that argues for the importance of public transport in rural communities. Your thesis and essay map might look like this: 

Having public transport in rural communities helps people improve their economic situation by giving them reliable transportation to their job, reducing the amount of money they spend on gas, and providing new and unionized work .

The underlined section is the essay map because it touches on the three big things the writer will talk about later. It literally maps out the rest of the essay!

So let’s review: Your thesis takes the idea you’ve introduced in your hook and context and wraps it up. Think of it like a television episode: the hook sets the scene by presenting a general statement and/or interesting idea that sucks you in. The context advances the plot by describing the topic in more detail and helping readers understand why the topic is important. And finally, the thesis statement provides the climax by telling the reader what you have to say about the topic. 

The thesis statement is the most important part of the intro. Without it, your reader won’t know what the purpose of your essay is! And for a piece of writing to be effective, it needs to have a clear purpose. Your thesis statement conveys that purpose , so it’s important to put careful thought into writing a clear and compelling thesis statement. 

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How To Write an Introduction Paragraph: Example and Analysis

Now that we’ve provided an intro paragraph outline and have explained the three key parts of an intro paragraph, let’s take a look at an intro paragraph in action.

To show you how an intro paragraph works, we’ve included a sample introduction paragraph below, followed by an analysis of its strengths and weaknesses.

Example of Introduction Paragraph

While college students in the U.S. are struggling with how to pay for college, there is another surprising demographic that’s affected by the pressure to pay for college: families and parents. In the face of tuition price tags that total more than $100,000 (as a low estimate), families must make difficult decisions about how to save for their children’s college education. Charting a feasible path to saving for college is further complicated by the FAFSA’s estimates for an “Expected Family Contribution”—an amount of money that is rarely feasible for most American families. Due to these challenging financial circumstances and cultural pressure to give one’s children the best possible chance of success in adulthood, many families are going into serious debt to pay for their children’s college education. The U.S. government should move toward bearing more of the financial burden of college education. 

Example of Introduction Paragraph: Analysis

Before we dive into analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of this example intro paragraph, let’s establish the essay topic. The sample intro indicates that t he essay topic will focus on one specific issue: who should cover the cost of college education in the U.S., and why. Both the hook and the context help us identify the topic, while the thesis in the last sentence tells us why this topic matters to the writer—they think the U.S. Government needs to help finance college education. This is also the writer’s argument, which they’ll cover in the body of their essay. 

Now that we’ve identified the essay topic presented in the sample intro, let’s dig into some analysis. To pin down its strengths and weaknesses, we’re going to use the following three questions to guide our example of introduction paragraph analysis: 

  • Does this intro provide an attention-grabbing opening sentence that conveys the essay topic? 
  • Does this intro provide relevant, engaging context about the essay topic? 
  • Does this intro provide a thesis statement that establishes the writer’s point of view on the topic and what specific aspects of the issue the essay will address? 

Now, let’s use the questions above to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of this sample intro paragraph. 

Does the Intro Have a Good Hook? 

First, the intro starts out with an attention-grabbing hook . The writer starts by presenting  an assumption (that the U.S. federal government bears most of the financial burden of college education), which makes the topic relatable to a wide audience of readers. Also note that the hook relates to the general topic of the essay, which is the high cost of college education. 

The hook then takes a surprising turn by presenting a counterclaim : that American families, rather than students, feel the true burden of paying for college. Some readers will have a strong emotional reaction to this provocative counterclaim, which will make them want to keep reading! As such, this intro provides an effective opening sentence that conveys the essay topic. 

Does the Intro Give Context?

T he second, third, and fourth sentences of the intro provide contextual details that reveal the specific focus of the writer’s paper . Remember: the context helps readers start to zoom in on what the paper will focus on, and what aspect of the general topic (college costs) will be discussed later on. 

The context in this intro reveals the intent and direction of the paper by explaining why the issue of families financing college is important. In other words, the context helps readers understand why this issue matters , and what aspects of this issue will be addressed in the paper.  

To provide effective context, the writer refers to issues (the exorbitant cost of college and high levels of family debt) that have received a lot of recent scholarly and media attention. These sentences of context also elaborate on the interesting perspective included in the hook: that American families are most affected by college costs.

Does the Intro Have a Thesis? 

Finally, this intro provides a thesis statement that conveys the writer’s point of view on the issue of financing college education. This writer believes that the U.S. government should do more to pay for students’ college educations. 

However, the thesis statement doesn’t give us any details about why the writer has made this claim or why this will help American families . There isn’t an essay map that helps readers understand what points the writer will make in the essay.

To revise this thesis statement so that it establishes the specific aspects of the topic that the essay will address, the writer could add the following to the beginning of the thesis statement:

The U.S. government should take on more of the financial burden of college education because other countries have shown this can improve education rates while reducing levels of familial poverty.

Check out the new section in bold. Not only does it clarify that the writer is talking about the pressure put on families, it touches on the big topics the writer will address in the paper: improving education rates and reduction of poverty. So not only do we have a clearer argumentative statement in this thesis, we also have an essay map!  

So, let’s recap our analysis. This sample intro paragraph does an effective job of providing an engaging hook and relatable, interesting context, but the thesis statement needs some work ! As you write your own intro paragraphs, you might consider using the questions above to evaluate and revise your work. Doing this will help ensure you’ve covered all of your bases and written an intro that your readers will find interesting!

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4 Tips for How To Write an Introduction Paragraph

Now that we’ve gone over an example of introduction paragraph analysis, let’s talk about how to write an introduction paragraph of your own. Keep reading for four tips for writing a successful intro paragraph for any essay. 

Tip 1: Analyze Your Essay Prompt

If you’re having trouble with how to start an introduction paragraph, analyze your essay prompt! Most teachers give you some kind of assignment sheet, formal instructions, or prompt to set the expectations for an essay they’ve assigned, right? Those instructions can help guide you as you write your intro paragraph!

Because they’ll be reading and responding to your essay, you want to make sure you meet your teacher’s expectations for an intro paragraph . For instance, if they’ve provided specific instructions about how long the intro should be or where the thesis statement should be located, be sure to follow them!

The type of paper you’re writing can give you clues as to how to approach your intro as well. If you’re writing a research paper, your professor might expect you to provide a research question or state a hypothesis in your intro. If you’re writing an argumentative essay, you’ll need to make sure your intro overviews the context surrounding your argument and your thesis statement includes a clear, defensible claim. 

Using the parameters set out by your instructor and assignment sheet can put some easy-to-follow boundaries in place for things like your intro’s length, structure, and content. Following these guidelines can free you up to focus on other aspects of your intro... like coming up with an exciting hook and conveying your point of view on your topic!

Tip 2: Narrow Your Topic

You can’t write an intro paragraph without first identifying your topic. To make your intro as effective as possible, you need to define the parameters of your topic clearly—and you need to be specific. 

For example, let’s say you want to write about college football. “NCAA football” is too broad of a topic for a paper. There is a lot to talk about in terms of college football! It would be tough to write an intro paragraph that’s focused, purposeful, and engaging on this topic. In fact, if you did try to address this whole topic, you’d probably end up writing a book!

Instead, you should narrow broad topics to  identify a specific question, claim, or issue pertaining to some aspect of NCAA football for your intro to be effective. So, for instance, you could frame your topic as, “How can college professors better support NCAA football players in academics?” This focused topic pertaining to NCAA football would give you a more manageable angle to discuss in your paper.

So before you think about writing your intro, ask yourself: Is my essay topic specific, focused, and logical? Does it convey an issue or question that I can explore over the course of several pages? Once you’ve established a good topic, you’ll have the foundation you need to write an effective intro paragraph . 

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Once you've figured out your topic, it's time to hit the books!

Tip 3: Do Your Research

This tip is tightly intertwined with the one above, and it’s crucial to writing a good intro: do your research! And, guess what? This tip applies to all papers—even ones that aren’t technically research papers. 

Here’s why you need to do some research: getting the lay of the land on what others have said about your topic—whether that’s scholars and researchers or the mass media— will help you narrow your topic, write an engaging hook, and provide relatable context. 

You don't want to sit down to write your intro without a solid understanding of the different perspectives on your topic. Whether those are the perspectives of experts or the general public, these points of view will help you write your intro in a way that is intriguing and compelling for your audience of readers. 

Tip 4: Write Multiple Drafts

Some say to write your intro first; others say write it last. The truth is, there isn’t a right or wrong time to write your intro—but you do need to have enough time to write multiple drafts . 

Oftentimes, your professor will ask you to write multiple drafts of your paper, which gives you a built-in way to make sure you revise your intro. Another approach you could take is to write out a rough draft of your intro before you begin writing your essay, then revise it multiple times as you draft out your paper. 

Here’s why this approach can work: as you write your paper, you’ll probably come up with new insights on your topic that you didn’t have right from the start. You can use these “light bulb” moments to reevaluate your intro and make revisions that keep it in line with your developing essay draft. 

Once you’ve written your entire essay, consider going back and revising your intro again . You can ask yourself these questions as you evaluate your intro: 

  • Is my hook still relevant to the way I’ve approached the topic in my essay?
  • Do I provide enough appropriate context to introduce my essay? 
  • Now that my essay is written, does my thesis statement still accurately reflect the point of view that I present in my essay?

Using these questions as a guide and putting your intro through multiple revisions will help ensure that you’ve written the best intro for the final draft of your essay. Also, revising your writing is always a good thing to do—and this applies to your intro, too!

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What's Next?

Your college essays also need great intro paragraphs. Here’s a guide that focuses on how to write the perfect intro for your admissions essays. 

Of course, the intro is just one part of your college essay . This article will teach you how to write a college essay that makes admissions counselors sit up and take notice. 

Are you trying to write an analytical essay? Our step-by-step guide can help you knock it out of the park.

Need more help with this topic? Check out Tutorbase!

Our vetted tutor database includes a range of experienced educators who can help you polish an essay for English or explain how derivatives work for Calculus. You can use dozens of filters and search criteria to find the perfect person for your needs.

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Ashley Sufflé Robinson has a Ph.D. in 19th Century English Literature. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

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best introduction for assignment

Read a text summary on how to write introductions and conclusions.

  • Newcastle University
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  • Academic Writing

Introductions and conclusions can be tricky to write. They do not contain the main substance of your assignment, but they do play a key role in helping the reader navigate your writing. The usual advice is

  • Introduction: say what you're going to say
  • Main body: say it
  • Conclusion: say that you've said it

However, this approach can feel repetitive and is not very rewarding to write or read.

A more engaging approach is to think about the perspective of the reader and what they need to know in order to make sense of your writing. In academic writing, it is the writer’s job to make their meaning clear (unlike in literature and fiction, where it is the reader’s job to interpret the meaning) so that the reader can concentrate on deciding what they think of your work and marking it. Introductions and conclusions play an important role in explaining your aims and approach, so to help you write them well, you could think about what questions the reader has for you as they pick up your work for the first time, and when they have finished reading it.

Introductions

The introductions are the first part of your assignment that the reader encounters, so it needs to make a good impression and set the scene for what follows. Your introduction is about 10% of the total word count. It can be difficult to think what that first opening sentence should be, or what an introduction should include. 

From your reader’s perspective, they have three questions when they first pick up your assignment.

What are you doing?

You could approach this question in a number of ways:

  • Although your lecturer knows the assignment questions they’ve set, they don’t know how you have understood and interpreted it. To demonstrate that you’ve read it accurately, you can echo back the question to your reader, paraphrased in your own words so they know you have really understood it rather than just copying and pasting it.
  • There might also be different ways to interpret the assignment, and clarifying for the reader how you’ve interpreted it would be helpful. Perhaps different angles on it are possible, there is more than one definition you could be working to, or you have been given a range of options within the assessment brief, and you need to tell the reader which approach you are taking.
  • It’s also common to give a brief overview of a topic in the introduction, providing the reader with some context so they can understand what is to follow. Of course, your lecturer is already likely to know this basic information, so you could think of it as giving the reader confidence that you also share that foundational knowledge and have got your facts right. This aspect needs to be as brief as possible, as it can be very descriptive (which will not get you higher marks) and if it extends too far, can take up too much space in your essay which would be better used for analysis, interpretation or argumentation. A rough guide is to ask yourself which information is built on later in your assignment and cut anything that doesn’t get ‘used’ later on.

Why are you doing this?

The obvious answer to this question is "because you told me to write this assignment”! A more interesting response, though, is to show that you've really understood why your lecturer has set that question and why it’s worth asking. None of the questions you are set at University will be simple or straightforward, but will be complex and problematic, and many have no single clear answer or approach. In responding thoughtfully to the question “why are you doing this”, you are reflecting on why it is significant, complex and worth doing, that you've understood the complexity of the assignment you’ve been set and recognise the lecturer’s aims in setting it.

How will you do this?

Every student who answers a particular assignment will produce a different answer, with a different structure, making different points and drawing on different information. Your reader wants to know what your own particular approach to the assignment will be.

  • You might answer this question in terms of what your structure is going to be, signalling how many sections you use and what order they appear in, signposting how you have broken the assignment down and organised it, so the reader knows what to expect.
  • You might also explain to the reader which choices and decisions you have made to narrow it down to a manageable, focussed assignment. You might have chosen to set yourself particular limits on the scope of your assignment (for example, a focussing on a particular context, timespan, or type), or which examples and case studies you’ve chosen to illustrate your answer with, and why they are appropriate for this assignment.
  • If relevant, you might also tell the reader about your methodology, the theories, models, definitions or approaches you have applied in order to answer the assignment question.

Your introduction may not include all these elements, or include them in the same balance or in this order, but if you address the reader’s three questions, your introduction will fulfil its purpose. Make sure you’re not jumping into your argument too early. Your introduction should introduce your argument but not actually do the work of making it yet; that is the job of the main body of the assignment.

Conclusions

Conclusions can feel a bit repetitive, as you need to revisit the points you’ve already made, but not include any new material. Again, the conclusion is usually about 10% of your total word count. The challenge is to make them engaging to read for your marker, but also interesting for you to write, so they feel purposeful. You cannot include any new material as conclusions should close a discussion down, not open up new avenues or leave points unresolved. If a point is important, it should be dealt with in the main body rather than as an afterthought.

As they read, your marker is focussing on each paragraph in detail, identifying the point you’re making, analysing and evaluating the evidence you’re using, and the way you explain, interpret and argue, to see if it makes sense. They’re also thinking about the quality of your work and what mark they’re going to give it, looking to see that you’ve met the marking criteria. University assignments are long enough that the reader will find it hard to give each point this kind of detailed scrutiny and keep the whole assignment in their mind at the same time. The job of the conclusion is to help them move from that close-up reading and zoom out to give them a sense of the whole.  

Again, a good approach is to think of the questions that your reader has when they reach the end of your assignment.

Where are we?

Your conclusion is the overall answer to the original assignment question you were set. See if you can summarise your overall answer in one sentence. This might be the first line of your conclusion. Make sure that your concluding answer does match the question you were set in the assessment.  

How did we get here?

Having told the reader where they've got to, you will need to remind them of how you got there. To strengthen their confidence in your overall answer, you can remind them of the points you made and how together they build your conclusion.  

Where does that leave us?

Although you cannot include new information in your conclusion, you can show your thinking in a new light. One question your reader may have is “where does that leave me’?  or “so what?”. You could therefore briefly discuss the significance of your conclusion. Now that you’ve demonstrated your answer to the question, how does that add to our overall understanding of this topic? What do we know, what can we do now, that we couldn’t before? If we hadn’t explored this topic, where would we be? Why is this conclusion important? This might resolve the issues you raised in the introduction when you answered the question ‘why am I doing this?’

A possible follow-on to this question is to examine what work might come next, if you didn’t have time constraints or word limits. This is particularly relevant in second and third year and masters level assignments, especially dissertations. This is a good way to show awareness of how your own thinking fits in the wider context of scholarship and research and how it might be developed. It might be a way to touch on aspects you had to cut out, or areas you couldn’t cover.

When to write the introduction and conclusion

You don’t have to write your assignment in order. If you find that the introduction is hard to start, then you could write it at the end of the process, which will ensure that it matches the assignment you’ve actually written. However, it might be a useful approach to at least begin by thinking about the introduction questions above, as it will help you in the planning process. Likewise, you could start with writing the conclusion if you have done extensive thinking and planning, as formulating your end goal might help to keep you on track (although be open to your overall answer changing a little in the process). Again, thinking about the conclusion questions above at the start of the process is a useful planning tool to clarify your thinking, even if you don’t write it until the end.

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Writing introductions and conclusions.

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How to write the best college assignments.

By Lois Weldon

When it comes to writing assignments, it is difficult to find a conceptualized guide with clear and simple tips that are easy to follow. That’s exactly what this guide will provide: few simple tips on how to write great assignments, right when you need them. Some of these points will probably be familiar to you, but there is no harm in being reminded of the most important things before you start writing the assignments, which are usually determining on your credits.

The most important aspects: Outline and Introduction

Preparation is the key to success, especially when it comes to academic assignments. It is recommended to always write an outline before you start writing the actual assignment. The outline should include the main points of discussion, which will keep you focused throughout the work and will make your key points clearly defined. Outlining the assignment will save you a lot of time because it will organize your thoughts and make your literature searches much easier. The outline will also help you to create different sections and divide up the word count between them, which will make the assignment more organized.

The introduction is the next important part you should focus on. This is the part that defines the quality of your assignment in the eyes of the reader. The introduction must include a brief background on the main points of discussion, the purpose of developing such work and clear indications on how the assignment is being organized. Keep this part brief, within one or two paragraphs.

This is an example of including the above mentioned points into the introduction of an assignment that elaborates the topic of obesity reaching proportions:

Background : The twenty first century is characterized by many public health challenges, among which obesity takes a major part. The increasing prevalence of obesity is creating an alarming situation in both developed and developing regions of the world.

Structure and aim : This assignment will elaborate and discuss the specific pattern of obesity epidemic development, as well as its epidemiology. Debt, trade and globalization will also be analyzed as factors that led to escalation of the problem. Moreover, the assignment will discuss the governmental interventions that make efforts to address this issue.

Practical tips on assignment writing

Here are some practical tips that will keep your work focused and effective:

–         Critical thinking – Academic writing has to be characterized by critical thinking, not only to provide the work with the needed level, but also because it takes part in the final mark.

–         Continuity of ideas – When you get to the middle of assignment, things can get confusing. You have to make sure that the ideas are flowing continuously within and between paragraphs, so the reader will be enabled to follow the argument easily. Dividing the work in different paragraphs is very important for this purpose.

–         Usage of ‘you’ and ‘I’ – According to the academic writing standards, the assignments should be written in an impersonal language, which means that the usage of ‘you’ and ‘I’ should be avoided. The only acceptable way of building your arguments is by using opinions and evidence from authoritative sources.

–         Referencing – this part of the assignment is extremely important and it takes a big part in the final mark. Make sure to use either Vancouver or Harvard referencing systems, and use the same system in the bibliography and while citing work of other sources within the text.  

–         Usage of examples – A clear understanding on your assignment’s topic should be provided by comparing different sources and identifying their strengths and weaknesses in an objective manner. This is the part where you should show how the knowledge can be applied into practice.

–         Numbering and bullets – Instead of using numbering and bullets, the academic writing style prefers the usage of paragraphs.

–         Including figures and tables – The figures and tables are an effective way of conveying information to the reader in a clear manner, without disturbing the word count. Each figure and table should have clear headings and you should make sure to mention their sources in the bibliography.

–         Word count – the word count of your assignment mustn’t be far above or far below the required word count. The outline will provide you with help in this aspect, so make sure to plan the work in order to keep it within the boundaries.

The importance of an effective conclusion

The conclusion of your assignment is your ultimate chance to provide powerful arguments that will impress the reader. The conclusion in academic writing is usually expressed through three main parts:

–         Stating the context and aim of the assignment

–         Summarizing the main points briefly

–         Providing final comments with consideration of the future (discussing clear examples of things that can be done in order to improve the situation concerning your topic of discussion).

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Lois Weldon is writer at  Uk.bestdissertation.com . Lives happily at London with her husband and lovely daughter. Adores writing tips for students. Passionate about Star Wars and yoga.

7 comments on “How To Write The Best College Assignments”

Extremely useful tip for students wanting to score well on their assignments. I concur with the writer that writing an outline before ACTUALLY starting to write assignments is extremely important. I have observed students who start off quite well but they tend to lose focus in between which causes them to lose marks. So an outline helps them to maintain the theme focused.

Hello Great information…. write assignments

Well elabrated

Thanks for the information. This site has amazing articles. Looking forward to continuing on this site.

This article is certainly going to help student . Well written.

Really good, thanks

Practical tips on assignment writing, the’re fantastic. Thank you!

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Essay writing: Introductions

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“A relevant and coherent beginning is perhaps your best single guarantee that the essay as a whole will achieve its object.” Gordon Taylor, A Student's Writing Guide

Your introduction is the first thing your marker will read and should be approximately 10% of your word count. Within the first minute they should know if your essay is going to be a good one or not. An introduction has several components but the most important of these are the last two we give here. You need to show the reader what your position is and how you are going to argue the case to get there so that the essay becomes your answer to the question rather than just an answer.

What an introduction should include:

  • A little basic background about the key subject area (just enough to put your essay into context, no more or you'll bore the reader).
  • Explanation of how you are defining any key terms . Confusion on this could be your undoing.
  • A road-map of how your essay will answer the question. What is your overall argument and how will you develop it?
  • A confirmation of your position .

Background information

It is good to start with a statement that fixes your essay topic and focus in a wider context so that the reader is sure of where they are within the field. This is a very small part of the introduction though - do not fall into the trap of writing a whole paragraph that is nothing but background information.

Beware though, this only has to be a little bit wider, not completely universal. That is, do not start with something like "In the whole field of nursing...." or "Since man could write, he has always...". Instead, simply situate the area that you are writing about within a slightly bigger area. For example, you could start with a general statement about a topic, outlining some key issues but explain that your essay will focus on only one. Here is an example:

The ability to communicate effectively and compassionately is a key skill within nursing. Communication is about more than being able to speak confidently and clearly, it is about effective listening (Singh, 2019), the use of gesture, body language and tone (Adebe et al., 2016) and the ability to tailor language and messaging to particular situations (Smith & Jones, 2015). This essay will explore the importance of non-verbal communication ...

The example introduction at the bottom of this page also starts with similar, short background information.

Prehistoric man with the caption "Since the dawn of man..."

Defining key terms

This does not mean quoting dictionary definitions - we all have access to dictionary.com with a click or two. There are many words we use in academic work that can have multiple or nuanced definitions. You have to write about how you are defining any potentially ambiguous terms in relation to  your  essay topic. This is really important for your reader, as it will inform them how you are using such words in the context of your essay and prevent confusion or misunderstanding.

Student deciding if 'superpower' relates to the USA and China or Superman and Spider-man

Stating your case (road mapping)

The main thing an introduction will do is...introduce your essay! That means you need to tell the reader what your conclusion is and how you will get there.

There is no need to worry about *SPOILER ALERTS* - this is not a detective novel you can give away the ending! Sorry, but building up suspense is just going to irritate the reader rather than eventually satisfy. Simply outline how your main arguments (give them in order) lead to your conclusion. In American essay guides you will see something described as the ‘thesis statement’ - although we don't use this terminology in the UK, it is still necessary to state in your introduction what the over-arching argument of your essay will be. Think of it as the mega-argument , to distinguish it from the mini-arguments you make in each paragraph. Look at the example introduction at the bottom of this page which includes both of these elements.

Car on a road to a place called 'Conclusion'

Confirming your position

To some extent, this is covered in your roadmap (above), but it is so important, it deserves some additional attention here. Setting out your position is an essential component of all essays. Brick et al. (2016:143) even suggest

"The purpose of an essay is to present a clear position and defend it"

It is, however, very difficult to defend a position if you have not made it clear in the first place. This is where your introduction comes in. In stating your position, you are ultimately outlining the answer to the question. You can then make the rest of your essay about providing the evidence that supports your answer. As such, if you make your position clear, you will find all subsequent paragraphs in your essay easier to write and join together. As you have already told your reader where the essay is going, you can be explicit in how each paragraph contributes to your mega-argument.

In establishing your position and defending it, you are ultimately engaging in scholarly debate. This is because your positions are supported by academic evidence and analysis. It is in your analysis of the academic evidence that should lead your reader to understand your position. Once again - this is only possible if your introduction has explained your position in the first place.

student standing on a cross holding a sign saying "my position"

An example introduction

(Essay title = Evaluate the role of stories as pedagogical tools in higher education)

Stories have been an essential communication technique for thousands of years and although teachers and parents still think they are important for educating younger children, they have been restricted to the role of entertainment for most of us since our teenage years. This essay will claim that stories make ideal pedagogical tools, whatever the age of the student, due to their unique position in cultural and cognitive development. To argue this, it will consider three main areas: firstly, the prevalence of stories across time and cultures and how the similarity of story structure suggests an inherent understanding of their form which could be of use to academics teaching multicultural cohorts when organising lecture material; secondly, the power of stories to enable listeners to personally relate to the content and how this increases the likelihood of changing thoughts, behaviours and decisions - a concept that has not gone unnoticed in some fields, both professional and academic; and finally, the way that different areas of the brain are activated when reading, listening to or watching a story unfold, which suggests that both understanding and ease of recall, two key components of learning, are both likely to be increased . Each of these alone could make a reasoned argument for including more stories within higher education teaching – taken together, this argument is even more compelling.

Key:   Background information (scene setting)   Stating the case (r oad map)    Confirming a position (in two places). Note in this introduction there was no need to define key terms.

Brick, J., Herke, M., and Wong, D., (2016) Academic Culture, A students guide to studying at university, 3rd edition. Victoria, Australia: Palgrave Macmillan.

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Self-introduction for Students [With Sample Intros]

  • Updated on Jan 13, 2023

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You would want to make a good impression on your friends when you introduce yourself on the first day in class at your school or college – or at some other gathering. Wouldn’t you?

A small note before we dive into thick of things: Self-introductions can be context-driven, implying that because of unique situation you’re in, you may have to customize some part of the introduction. So, feel free to add or subtract to what’s covered here.

What to include in self-introduction?

Is there a format (for the introduction) to follow? The organizer, for example, may ask to include your name, place you come from, and your hobbies in the introduction.

If there is a format, follow it, but feel free to venture into areas that aren’t included in the format if they provide a more complete picture of yours.

You may include following in your introduction:

1. The start

You can start with the obvious – your name.

But that’s a common start. You can be bit innovative by starting with an attention-grabber. Watch the beginning of this video on marketing to get a feel of what I’m saying (watch the first 15 seconds):

Neil didn’t start with his name. He started with things that will grab people’s attention immediately and came to his name later on.

You can follow the same strategy to stand out among your classmates, most of whom would be following the standard ‘name first’ approach. You can start with a unique experience or a peculiar fact about your city or your uncommon hobby. The first sample intro (later in the post) follows this strategy.

More resources on conversations and introductions:

  • How to introduce yourself in different settings?
  • How to say ‘thank you’?
  • How to respond when someone asks ‘how are you’?

2. Where are you from?

Mention the city you come from. You may add a sentence or two about the city as well if there is something interesting to talk about. Maybe the city is known for historic monuments. Maybe it’s known for natural resources.

And if you’ve lived in multiple cities, you may briefly mention the names and, as mentioned above, a sentence or two on the most interesting of them.

3. Where did you last attend the school?

If you recently moved to a new school (or college) and are introducing yourself there, you can briefly talk about your last school. Are there any interesting facts about your last school? If yes, mention them. Maybe it was established a long, long time ago. Maybe it has produced few famous alumni.

If you’re continuing in the same school, you may mention how many years you’ve been studying there.

4. Interests, hobbies, and achievements

What are your interests and hobbies?

Playing a sport? Traveling? Hiking? Reading? Kite flying? Or something unusual, say bull fighting?

Go into details if you’ve pursued the hobby with serious interest. For example, if you’re into reading, mention what genres you read, your favorite books, your favorite author, and how reading has affected you.

Don’t forget to mention your participation in extracurricular activities in school, if you did. Don’t forget to mention any significant achievements you’ve had?

5. Which stream/department/subject have you enrolled in?

You can briefly talk about which subjects (math, science, arts, commerce, biology, and so on) you’ve picked or you intend to pick in future. Optionally, you may also mention why you made the choice you have. Was it because you love it? Was it because it’ll help you achieve your career goals?

If you’re a college student, you can mention the department you’ve enrolled in. Are you in Arts, Commerce, Mechanical Engineering, Science, or Economics?

This doesn’t apply though if you’re introducing yourself to students who’re all from the same stream/department/subject.

6. Do you’ve clarity on interests/goals you want to pursue in future?

If you’re in K-12, you may not have seriously evaluated what career path you want to follow, and that’s fine. But if you’ve certain career aspiration and if you want to talk about it, you can. Some want to become engineer. Some, astronaut. Some, doctor. Some, model. Speak out what you aspire to become.

Most college students though have more concrete idea on post-college career. If you’ve decided the career path you want to pursue after college, you can share it with your classmates. You never know few of your classmates harboring same career aspirations may just approach you to be friends. You may also mention professional clubs you want to join to hone your skills.

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7. Where can you help others?

If you’ve a strength others in your class can benefit from, feel free to share it. For example, if you’re good in dancing, you can offer to teach the ropes to anyone interested. If you’re strong in a particular subject that is part of your syllabus, you can offer to help others in that subject.

If people know of your strengths, they’ll readily approach you when they need help. This is an easy way to make friends in college. And if you think helping others may be a time waster, you should remember that you too may need help in areas where others are stronger.

This is also a good stage – by offering help – to finish your intro. (See the first sample intro.)

Should I talk about my family?

Avoid it unless the format of the intro requires you to talk about your family as well. You need not go into what your parents do and which class your siblings study in.

Should I mention my last year’s grades?

You shouldn’t unless specifically asked to or others are mentioning it. Top grades can lend a snobbish air to your intro, even if you’re otherwise. Students may make an impression that you’re flaunting your grades, even if you aren’t.

Remember, the primary goal of your intro is to make friends, find people with shared interests.

Four do’s and don’ts when introducing yourself

1. listen to other intros.

Listen to intros that come before yours. If you can refer to someone else’s point or two seamlessly in your intro, you’ll impress people around.

2. Practice, but don’t cram

People often go blank on some of the points or get nervous when they stand up to speak. The best long-term way to overcome this is exposure to such speaking experiences . But in the immediate term, practice what you want to say few times (don’t cram though) to increase your odds of speaking with confidence.

3. Appear confident even if you’re not

After the presentations by executives and entrepreneurs (presumably confident speakers) as part of an executive program at Harvard University, Carmine Gallo , one of the judges, asked them how their presentations went. He heard following comments:

“I was so nervous. I was shaking.”

“I forgot what to say about a slide.”

“I stumbled over my words.”

“I totally lost my place.”

But, no one in the audience spotted those mistakes.

This phenomenon is called spotlight effect , which in nutshell means that people overestimate how much others are noticing their actions and appearance.

What’s the lesson?

If you’re nervous or you make few mistakes, don’t let them rattle you. Most won’t even notice them. Caroline Goyder captures this sentiment aptly in her book Find Your Voice: The Secret to Talking with Confidence in Any Situation :

When you dive into contribution [speaking], and move beyond the anxious competing, you realize that all the worry was such a waste of time. No one is ever judging you as harshly as you judge yourself. Because the truth is that most people are thinking about themselves.

But if you let nervousness and mistakes overpower you, you may make a mistake or display body language that will be noticed by all. And once you’re through the first few lines in your intro, your nerves will start easing.

So, stay composed and carry on. Many in the audience in fact wouldn’t even be listening to most introductions, as they would be busy silently rehearsing their own lines.

4. Make eye contact and be enthusiastic

Make eye contact with other students while speaking. Don’t fix your eyes on a familiar section of the audience. Move your eyes around. And, last but important, your voice and body language should show enthusiasm.

Here are few sample self-introductions for you to get a hang of how they’re done:

Sample self-introductions

Introduction 1

I once spent an entire night in a dense forest with a friend. Well, this act was not to show off how brave I was, but it was forced on me… by my foolishness. During a trek in [name of the region], I and a friend got too adventurous and strayed from our regular route despite instructions to the contrary by our trek guide. We got lost. We survived somehow (that’s a story for another day), but I haven’t given up on my adventure streak and love for outdoors.

Friends, I’m [your first name] and I love outdoors. I’ve been to treks in Himalayas on multiple occasions. These outdoor expeditions have also forced me to learn basic cooking. Well, I don’t boast of cooking dishes you’ll relish, but yes when you’re dying of hunger in the middle of night, you can count on me. I also love cycling long distances – 20+ kilometers in a stretch – and I can manage singing which some may find intolerable.

I’m from [name of the city]. It’s not a big place, but it somehow exists on the map. I’m really excited to be here. I look forward to having some fun, making friends, and building myself up for college. If you’re organizing any outdoor event in future, you can always count on me for help.

Thanks for giving me this opportunity to introduce myself.

Introduction 2

My name is [your first name]. I’m from [name of the city] where I finished my schooling last year from [name of the school]. Is there anyone here from my city? (Changes tack to engage with the audience.) OK, few.

I like watching movies, at least once a month. I play basketball on weekends and chess whenever I get time. I’m into reading thriller novels as well, Dan Brown being my favorite novelist.

I’m happy to step into college life, which provides more freedom and where, finally, I don’t have to come in a uniform. Post-college, I aspire to work in consulting industry.

I’m particularly strong in Excel worksheets and creating well-designed banners and documents. If anyone requires support in these areas, I’ll be glad to help. I look forward to meeting each one of you in the coming days.

Thanks. Have a great day.

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Anil is the person behind content on this website, which is visited by 3,000,000+ learners every year. He writes on most aspects of English Language Skills. More about him here:

15 Comments

This really helped me… Thank you so so much.

Thank u….this is quite helpful to overcome my nervousness and get into action..Cheers?

Man, I was so nervous about my interview for school admission. But after reading this, I felt comfortable. Thanks, this was a great explanation.

It helped me a lot. Thank you so much. It was like I was the center of attraction. Thank you again.

Thanx…. It really helped on my first day of college.

Dude, this is another level. Thanks a lot.

Thanks a lot. It was useful. Now, I should be able to introduce my self without nerves ????

Thank you. Now I get some ideas for self intro and thank you for your brief explanation.

I was a little nervous about my varsity first introduction and my confidence increased after watching it.

Intro 2 was like fire…. It helped me a lot, thanx!!

Thanks, dude!!!! I am a school-level student and the introduction part really helped me.

I have a virtual introduction meeting with my seniors in college. I am so nervous about it. This piece is so helpful. Thanks.

Excellent. I like this a lot. I searched for this type of introduction on many websites, but this post is so interesting and good enough to impress my teacher and classmates.

My name is Yeabkal Solomon. I’m a first year student at Arba minch University. It helped me when I was gave my oral presentation.

I was very scared. I was really scared. Thank you very much for helping with the interview. It was very helpful for me

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Home / Blog / 15 foolproof tips for writing a great assignment

15 foolproof tips for writing a great assignment

15th Aug 2015

Student advice

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If you’re the kind of person that only has to hear the word “assignment” and immediately has flashbacks to stuffy classrooms, ticking clocks and staring a blank page for hours….DON’T PANIC.

Our 15 foolproof tips for writing a great assignment will guide you to success.

Before you start…

1. do your reading.

Your course or module will have a reading list; make sure you actually use it! Your tutors choose texts to specifically help with your assignments and modules, and you’ll gain some valuable insights into the topic that are sure to make writing your assignment easier.

Expert tip:  If you have the time, do some reading from other sources not on your list to back up your argument.

2. Check the deadline

There’s nothing worse than scheduling time to sit down and write then glancing at the calendar and realising you’ve only got a few days left. Double-checking the deadline means you’ll have no nasty surprises.

Expert tip:  There are many apps out there that can add a ‘countdown’ to your phone or tablet. Use these to keep your assignment deadline front of mind.

3. Plan your time

Finding time to write is easier said than done, but if you break your time down into manageable chunks you’ll find it’s much easier to keep on top of your workload. Try scheduling mini-deadlines along the way (e.g. aim to have the first section done by a certain day) to keep your momentum going.

Expert tip:  Be realistic about the time you have spare, and the time you’re willing to give up. If you schedule a writing session at 9 p.m. on Friday evening when you’d rather be relaxing, chances are you won’t get anything done.

4. Ask for help (if you need it)

If there’s any doubt in your mind about the question or the requirements of the assignment, ask your tutor. It’s better to start right than have to re-write in the last few days.

Expert tip:  Remember, your tutor wants you to do well. He or she will not be annoyed if you need to ask a few questions.

5. Plan your assignment structure

Before you start, it can help to create a basic assignment structure. This can be as detailed as you like but the basic structure should contain your introduction points, your key arguments and points, and your planned conclusion.

Expert tip:  Try writing out your plan on sticky notes. These will allow you to rearrange your arguments and points easily as your plan develops.

As you’re writing…

6. introduction.

You wouldn’t start a conversation without introducing yourself; your assignment is the same. Your first paragraph should introduce your key argument, add a bit of context and the key issues of the question, and then go on to explain how you plan to answer it.

Expert tip:  Some people find it easier to write their introduction after they’ve finished the rest of their assignment. Give it a try!

7. Structure your argument

As you write the body of your assignment, make sure that each point you make has some supporting evidence. Use statistics or quotes you gathered during your reading to support your argument, or even as something to argue against.

Expert tip:  If you’re using a lot of different sources, it’s easy to forget to add them to your reference list. Make things easier for yourself by writing it as you go along.

8. Conclusion

Your conclusion is your final chance to summarise your argument and leave a lasting impression with your reader. Make sure you recap the key points and arguments you made in your assignment, including supporting evidence if needed.

Expert tip:  Make sure that you don’t introduce any new ideas in your conclusion; this section is purely for summarising your previous arguments.

9. Getting over writer’s block

Struggling to write? There’s nothing more frustrating than putting aside time to write and then just staring at a blank page. Luckily, there are lots of thing to try to get you inspired : a change of scenery, putting on some music, writing another section of the essay or just taking a short break.

Expert tip:  If you find yourself unable to write, try to use your time to read ahead or re-read what you’ve already written.

10. Make sure you use your ‘essay voice’

While each university, school or each college will probably have its own style guide, you should always use a neutral and professional tone when writing an assignment. Try to avoid slang, overly-familiar phrases and definitely don’t use text-speak!

Expert tip:  If you’re not sure about a phrase or word, search for it online to see what other publications use it. If it’s in a dictionary or used by a national newspaper it’s probably OK to use in your assignment.

After you finish…

11. get a little distance.

If you’ve got time (and you should have if you managed to stick to your schedule!), put your first draft aside for a day or two before re-reading it. This will give you time to step back and read your assignment objectively, making it easier to spot mistakes and issues.

Expert tip:  If you find it easier to review on paper, print out your assignment with double-line spacing to accommodate your notes and corrections.

12. Make sure you’ve answered the question

As you’re reading through your first draft of your assignment, check that all your points are relevant to the original question. It’s easy to drift off on a tangent when you’re in mid-flow.

Expert tip:  Read each paragraph and consider it on its own merit as to whether it answers the question, and also to check that it contributes to your overall argument.

13. Don’t be afraid to cut text out

Sometimes, when you’ve struggled to reach a word count it can be hard to remove text that you’ve slaved over. But if a piece of text isn’t supporting your argument then it doesn’t have a place in your assignment.

Expert tip:  With word processing software, the ‘Track Changes’ feature allows you to edit text without losing it forever. And if you realise later that you’ve made a mistake, just reject the change.

14. Check and double-check your spelling

Nothing can give a bad impression as quickly as a spelling mistake. Errors are distracting, look unprofessional and in the worst case they can undermine your argument. If you’re unsure about the correct use of a word, look it up online or use an alternative that you’re more comfortable with.

Expert tip:  While you’re running your spell-checker, check your word count too. You’re usually allowed to deviate by 10% above or below the assignment word count, but check with your institution’s guidelines.

15. Cite your sources

References and creating a bibliography are key skills that you unfortunately have to master when writing an assignment. Check your institution’s guidelines before you start to make sure you’re including all the information you need.

Expert tip:  Some eBooks have a citation feature that automatically collates all the information you need for your bibliography.

Wondering how you can apply these skills? Download a prospectus to choose your course today!

best introduction for assignment

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Understanding Assignments

What this handout is about.

The first step in any successful college writing venture is reading the assignment. While this sounds like a simple task, it can be a tough one. This handout will help you unravel your assignment and begin to craft an effective response. Much of the following advice will involve translating typical assignment terms and practices into meaningful clues to the type of writing your instructor expects. See our short video for more tips.

Basic beginnings

Regardless of the assignment, department, or instructor, adopting these two habits will serve you well :

  • Read the assignment carefully as soon as you receive it. Do not put this task off—reading the assignment at the beginning will save you time, stress, and problems later. An assignment can look pretty straightforward at first, particularly if the instructor has provided lots of information. That does not mean it will not take time and effort to complete; you may even have to learn a new skill to complete the assignment.
  • Ask the instructor about anything you do not understand. Do not hesitate to approach your instructor. Instructors would prefer to set you straight before you hand the paper in. That’s also when you will find their feedback most useful.

Assignment formats

Many assignments follow a basic format. Assignments often begin with an overview of the topic, include a central verb or verbs that describe the task, and offer some additional suggestions, questions, or prompts to get you started.

An Overview of Some Kind

The instructor might set the stage with some general discussion of the subject of the assignment, introduce the topic, or remind you of something pertinent that you have discussed in class. For example:

“Throughout history, gerbils have played a key role in politics,” or “In the last few weeks of class, we have focused on the evening wear of the housefly …”

The Task of the Assignment

Pay attention; this part tells you what to do when you write the paper. Look for the key verb or verbs in the sentence. Words like analyze, summarize, or compare direct you to think about your topic in a certain way. Also pay attention to words such as how, what, when, where, and why; these words guide your attention toward specific information. (See the section in this handout titled “Key Terms” for more information.)

“Analyze the effect that gerbils had on the Russian Revolution”, or “Suggest an interpretation of housefly undergarments that differs from Darwin’s.”

Additional Material to Think about

Here you will find some questions to use as springboards as you begin to think about the topic. Instructors usually include these questions as suggestions rather than requirements. Do not feel compelled to answer every question unless the instructor asks you to do so. Pay attention to the order of the questions. Sometimes they suggest the thinking process your instructor imagines you will need to follow to begin thinking about the topic.

“You may wish to consider the differing views held by Communist gerbils vs. Monarchist gerbils, or Can there be such a thing as ‘the housefly garment industry’ or is it just a home-based craft?”

These are the instructor’s comments about writing expectations:

“Be concise”, “Write effectively”, or “Argue furiously.”

Technical Details

These instructions usually indicate format rules or guidelines.

“Your paper must be typed in Palatino font on gray paper and must not exceed 600 pages. It is due on the anniversary of Mao Tse-tung’s death.”

The assignment’s parts may not appear in exactly this order, and each part may be very long or really short. Nonetheless, being aware of this standard pattern can help you understand what your instructor wants you to do.

Interpreting the assignment

Ask yourself a few basic questions as you read and jot down the answers on the assignment sheet:

Why did your instructor ask you to do this particular task?

Who is your audience.

  • What kind of evidence do you need to support your ideas?

What kind of writing style is acceptable?

  • What are the absolute rules of the paper?

Try to look at the question from the point of view of the instructor. Recognize that your instructor has a reason for giving you this assignment and for giving it to you at a particular point in the semester. In every assignment, the instructor has a challenge for you. This challenge could be anything from demonstrating an ability to think clearly to demonstrating an ability to use the library. See the assignment not as a vague suggestion of what to do but as an opportunity to show that you can handle the course material as directed. Paper assignments give you more than a topic to discuss—they ask you to do something with the topic. Keep reminding yourself of that. Be careful to avoid the other extreme as well: do not read more into the assignment than what is there.

Of course, your instructor has given you an assignment so that he or she will be able to assess your understanding of the course material and give you an appropriate grade. But there is more to it than that. Your instructor has tried to design a learning experience of some kind. Your instructor wants you to think about something in a particular way for a particular reason. If you read the course description at the beginning of your syllabus, review the assigned readings, and consider the assignment itself, you may begin to see the plan, purpose, or approach to the subject matter that your instructor has created for you. If you still aren’t sure of the assignment’s goals, try asking the instructor. For help with this, see our handout on getting feedback .

Given your instructor’s efforts, it helps to answer the question: What is my purpose in completing this assignment? Is it to gather research from a variety of outside sources and present a coherent picture? Is it to take material I have been learning in class and apply it to a new situation? Is it to prove a point one way or another? Key words from the assignment can help you figure this out. Look for key terms in the form of active verbs that tell you what to do.

Key Terms: Finding Those Active Verbs

Here are some common key words and definitions to help you think about assignment terms:

Information words Ask you to demonstrate what you know about the subject, such as who, what, when, where, how, and why.

  • define —give the subject’s meaning (according to someone or something). Sometimes you have to give more than one view on the subject’s meaning
  • describe —provide details about the subject by answering question words (such as who, what, when, where, how, and why); you might also give details related to the five senses (what you see, hear, feel, taste, and smell)
  • explain —give reasons why or examples of how something happened
  • illustrate —give descriptive examples of the subject and show how each is connected with the subject
  • summarize —briefly list the important ideas you learned about the subject
  • trace —outline how something has changed or developed from an earlier time to its current form
  • research —gather material from outside sources about the subject, often with the implication or requirement that you will analyze what you have found

Relation words Ask you to demonstrate how things are connected.

  • compare —show how two or more things are similar (and, sometimes, different)
  • contrast —show how two or more things are dissimilar
  • apply—use details that you’ve been given to demonstrate how an idea, theory, or concept works in a particular situation
  • cause —show how one event or series of events made something else happen
  • relate —show or describe the connections between things

Interpretation words Ask you to defend ideas of your own about the subject. Do not see these words as requesting opinion alone (unless the assignment specifically says so), but as requiring opinion that is supported by concrete evidence. Remember examples, principles, definitions, or concepts from class or research and use them in your interpretation.

  • assess —summarize your opinion of the subject and measure it against something
  • prove, justify —give reasons or examples to demonstrate how or why something is the truth
  • evaluate, respond —state your opinion of the subject as good, bad, or some combination of the two, with examples and reasons
  • support —give reasons or evidence for something you believe (be sure to state clearly what it is that you believe)
  • synthesize —put two or more things together that have not been put together in class or in your readings before; do not just summarize one and then the other and say that they are similar or different—you must provide a reason for putting them together that runs all the way through the paper
  • analyze —determine how individual parts create or relate to the whole, figure out how something works, what it might mean, or why it is important
  • argue —take a side and defend it with evidence against the other side

More Clues to Your Purpose As you read the assignment, think about what the teacher does in class:

  • What kinds of textbooks or coursepack did your instructor choose for the course—ones that provide background information, explain theories or perspectives, or argue a point of view?
  • In lecture, does your instructor ask your opinion, try to prove her point of view, or use keywords that show up again in the assignment?
  • What kinds of assignments are typical in this discipline? Social science classes often expect more research. Humanities classes thrive on interpretation and analysis.
  • How do the assignments, readings, and lectures work together in the course? Instructors spend time designing courses, sometimes even arguing with their peers about the most effective course materials. Figuring out the overall design to the course will help you understand what each assignment is meant to achieve.

Now, what about your reader? Most undergraduates think of their audience as the instructor. True, your instructor is a good person to keep in mind as you write. But for the purposes of a good paper, think of your audience as someone like your roommate: smart enough to understand a clear, logical argument, but not someone who already knows exactly what is going on in your particular paper. Remember, even if the instructor knows everything there is to know about your paper topic, he or she still has to read your paper and assess your understanding. In other words, teach the material to your reader.

Aiming a paper at your audience happens in two ways: you make decisions about the tone and the level of information you want to convey.

  • Tone means the “voice” of your paper. Should you be chatty, formal, or objective? Usually you will find some happy medium—you do not want to alienate your reader by sounding condescending or superior, but you do not want to, um, like, totally wig on the man, you know? Eschew ostentatious erudition: some students think the way to sound academic is to use big words. Be careful—you can sound ridiculous, especially if you use the wrong big words.
  • The level of information you use depends on who you think your audience is. If you imagine your audience as your instructor and she already knows everything you have to say, you may find yourself leaving out key information that can cause your argument to be unconvincing and illogical. But you do not have to explain every single word or issue. If you are telling your roommate what happened on your favorite science fiction TV show last night, you do not say, “First a dark-haired white man of average height, wearing a suit and carrying a flashlight, walked into the room. Then a purple alien with fifteen arms and at least three eyes turned around. Then the man smiled slightly. In the background, you could hear a clock ticking. The room was fairly dark and had at least two windows that I saw.” You also do not say, “This guy found some aliens. The end.” Find some balance of useful details that support your main point.

You’ll find a much more detailed discussion of these concepts in our handout on audience .

The Grim Truth

With a few exceptions (including some lab and ethnography reports), you are probably being asked to make an argument. You must convince your audience. It is easy to forget this aim when you are researching and writing; as you become involved in your subject matter, you may become enmeshed in the details and focus on learning or simply telling the information you have found. You need to do more than just repeat what you have read. Your writing should have a point, and you should be able to say it in a sentence. Sometimes instructors call this sentence a “thesis” or a “claim.”

So, if your instructor tells you to write about some aspect of oral hygiene, you do not want to just list: “First, you brush your teeth with a soft brush and some peanut butter. Then, you floss with unwaxed, bologna-flavored string. Finally, gargle with bourbon.” Instead, you could say, “Of all the oral cleaning methods, sandblasting removes the most plaque. Therefore it should be recommended by the American Dental Association.” Or, “From an aesthetic perspective, moldy teeth can be quite charming. However, their joys are short-lived.”

Convincing the reader of your argument is the goal of academic writing. It doesn’t have to say “argument” anywhere in the assignment for you to need one. Look at the assignment and think about what kind of argument you could make about it instead of just seeing it as a checklist of information you have to present. For help with understanding the role of argument in academic writing, see our handout on argument .

What kind of evidence do you need?

There are many kinds of evidence, and what type of evidence will work for your assignment can depend on several factors–the discipline, the parameters of the assignment, and your instructor’s preference. Should you use statistics? Historical examples? Do you need to conduct your own experiment? Can you rely on personal experience? See our handout on evidence for suggestions on how to use evidence appropriately.

Make sure you are clear about this part of the assignment, because your use of evidence will be crucial in writing a successful paper. You are not just learning how to argue; you are learning how to argue with specific types of materials and ideas. Ask your instructor what counts as acceptable evidence. You can also ask a librarian for help. No matter what kind of evidence you use, be sure to cite it correctly—see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial .

You cannot always tell from the assignment just what sort of writing style your instructor expects. The instructor may be really laid back in class but still expect you to sound formal in writing. Or the instructor may be fairly formal in class and ask you to write a reflection paper where you need to use “I” and speak from your own experience.

Try to avoid false associations of a particular field with a style (“art historians like wacky creativity,” or “political scientists are boring and just give facts”) and look instead to the types of readings you have been given in class. No one expects you to write like Plato—just use the readings as a guide for what is standard or preferable to your instructor. When in doubt, ask your instructor about the level of formality she or he expects.

No matter what field you are writing for or what facts you are including, if you do not write so that your reader can understand your main idea, you have wasted your time. So make clarity your main goal. For specific help with style, see our handout on style .

Technical details about the assignment

The technical information you are given in an assignment always seems like the easy part. This section can actually give you lots of little hints about approaching the task. Find out if elements such as page length and citation format (see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial ) are negotiable. Some professors do not have strong preferences as long as you are consistent and fully answer the assignment. Some professors are very specific and will deduct big points for deviations.

Usually, the page length tells you something important: The instructor thinks the size of the paper is appropriate to the assignment’s parameters. In plain English, your instructor is telling you how many pages it should take for you to answer the question as fully as you are expected to. So if an assignment is two pages long, you cannot pad your paper with examples or reword your main idea several times. Hit your one point early, defend it with the clearest example, and finish quickly. If an assignment is ten pages long, you can be more complex in your main points and examples—and if you can only produce five pages for that assignment, you need to see someone for help—as soon as possible.

Tricks that don’t work

Your instructors are not fooled when you:

  • spend more time on the cover page than the essay —graphics, cool binders, and cute titles are no replacement for a well-written paper.
  • use huge fonts, wide margins, or extra spacing to pad the page length —these tricks are immediately obvious to the eye. Most instructors use the same word processor you do. They know what’s possible. Such tactics are especially damning when the instructor has a stack of 60 papers to grade and yours is the only one that low-flying airplane pilots could read.
  • use a paper from another class that covered “sort of similar” material . Again, the instructor has a particular task for you to fulfill in the assignment that usually relates to course material and lectures. Your other paper may not cover this material, and turning in the same paper for more than one course may constitute an Honor Code violation . Ask the instructor—it can’t hurt.
  • get all wacky and “creative” before you answer the question . Showing that you are able to think beyond the boundaries of a simple assignment can be good, but you must do what the assignment calls for first. Again, check with your instructor. A humorous tone can be refreshing for someone grading a stack of papers, but it will not get you a good grade if you have not fulfilled the task.

Critical reading of assignments leads to skills in other types of reading and writing. If you get good at figuring out what the real goals of assignments are, you are going to be better at understanding the goals of all of your classes and fields of study.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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  • Knowledge Base
  • Research paper

Writing a Research Paper Introduction | Step-by-Step Guide

Published on September 24, 2022 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on March 27, 2023.

Writing a Research Paper Introduction

The introduction to a research paper is where you set up your topic and approach for the reader. It has several key goals:

  • Present your topic and get the reader interested
  • Provide background or summarize existing research
  • Position your own approach
  • Detail your specific research problem and problem statement
  • Give an overview of the paper’s structure

The introduction looks slightly different depending on whether your paper presents the results of original empirical research or constructs an argument by engaging with a variety of sources.

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Table of contents

Step 1: introduce your topic, step 2: describe the background, step 3: establish your research problem, step 4: specify your objective(s), step 5: map out your paper, research paper introduction examples, frequently asked questions about the research paper introduction.

The first job of the introduction is to tell the reader what your topic is and why it’s interesting or important. This is generally accomplished with a strong opening hook.

The hook is a striking opening sentence that clearly conveys the relevance of your topic. Think of an interesting fact or statistic, a strong statement, a question, or a brief anecdote that will get the reader wondering about your topic.

For example, the following could be an effective hook for an argumentative paper about the environmental impact of cattle farming:

A more empirical paper investigating the relationship of Instagram use with body image issues in adolescent girls might use the following hook:

Don’t feel that your hook necessarily has to be deeply impressive or creative. Clarity and relevance are still more important than catchiness. The key thing is to guide the reader into your topic and situate your ideas.

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best introduction for assignment

This part of the introduction differs depending on what approach your paper is taking.

In a more argumentative paper, you’ll explore some general background here. In a more empirical paper, this is the place to review previous research and establish how yours fits in.

Argumentative paper: Background information

After you’ve caught your reader’s attention, specify a bit more, providing context and narrowing down your topic.

Provide only the most relevant background information. The introduction isn’t the place to get too in-depth; if more background is essential to your paper, it can appear in the body .

Empirical paper: Describing previous research

For a paper describing original research, you’ll instead provide an overview of the most relevant research that has already been conducted. This is a sort of miniature literature review —a sketch of the current state of research into your topic, boiled down to a few sentences.

This should be informed by genuine engagement with the literature. Your search can be less extensive than in a full literature review, but a clear sense of the relevant research is crucial to inform your own work.

Begin by establishing the kinds of research that have been done, and end with limitations or gaps in the research that you intend to respond to.

The next step is to clarify how your own research fits in and what problem it addresses.

Argumentative paper: Emphasize importance

In an argumentative research paper, you can simply state the problem you intend to discuss, and what is original or important about your argument.

Empirical paper: Relate to the literature

In an empirical research paper, try to lead into the problem on the basis of your discussion of the literature. Think in terms of these questions:

  • What research gap is your work intended to fill?
  • What limitations in previous work does it address?
  • What contribution to knowledge does it make?

You can make the connection between your problem and the existing research using phrases like the following.

Now you’ll get into the specifics of what you intend to find out or express in your research paper.

The way you frame your research objectives varies. An argumentative paper presents a thesis statement, while an empirical paper generally poses a research question (sometimes with a hypothesis as to the answer).

Argumentative paper: Thesis statement

The thesis statement expresses the position that the rest of the paper will present evidence and arguments for. It can be presented in one or two sentences, and should state your position clearly and directly, without providing specific arguments for it at this point.

Empirical paper: Research question and hypothesis

The research question is the question you want to answer in an empirical research paper.

Present your research question clearly and directly, with a minimum of discussion at this point. The rest of the paper will be taken up with discussing and investigating this question; here you just need to express it.

A research question can be framed either directly or indirectly.

  • This study set out to answer the following question: What effects does daily use of Instagram have on the prevalence of body image issues among adolescent girls?
  • We investigated the effects of daily Instagram use on the prevalence of body image issues among adolescent girls.

If your research involved testing hypotheses , these should be stated along with your research question. They are usually presented in the past tense, since the hypothesis will already have been tested by the time you are writing up your paper.

For example, the following hypothesis might respond to the research question above:

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The final part of the introduction is often dedicated to a brief overview of the rest of the paper.

In a paper structured using the standard scientific “introduction, methods, results, discussion” format, this isn’t always necessary. But if your paper is structured in a less predictable way, it’s important to describe the shape of it for the reader.

If included, the overview should be concise, direct, and written in the present tense.

  • This paper will first discuss several examples of survey-based research into adolescent social media use, then will go on to …
  • This paper first discusses several examples of survey-based research into adolescent social media use, then goes on to …

Full examples of research paper introductions are shown in the tabs below: one for an argumentative paper, the other for an empirical paper.

  • Argumentative paper
  • Empirical paper

Are cows responsible for climate change? A recent study (RIVM, 2019) shows that cattle farmers account for two thirds of agricultural nitrogen emissions in the Netherlands. These emissions result from nitrogen in manure, which can degrade into ammonia and enter the atmosphere. The study’s calculations show that agriculture is the main source of nitrogen pollution, accounting for 46% of the country’s total emissions. By comparison, road traffic and households are responsible for 6.1% each, the industrial sector for 1%. While efforts are being made to mitigate these emissions, policymakers are reluctant to reckon with the scale of the problem. The approach presented here is a radical one, but commensurate with the issue. This paper argues that the Dutch government must stimulate and subsidize livestock farmers, especially cattle farmers, to transition to sustainable vegetable farming. It first establishes the inadequacy of current mitigation measures, then discusses the various advantages of the results proposed, and finally addresses potential objections to the plan on economic grounds.

The rise of social media has been accompanied by a sharp increase in the prevalence of body image issues among women and girls. This correlation has received significant academic attention: Various empirical studies have been conducted into Facebook usage among adolescent girls (Tiggermann & Slater, 2013; Meier & Gray, 2014). These studies have consistently found that the visual and interactive aspects of the platform have the greatest influence on body image issues. Despite this, highly visual social media (HVSM) such as Instagram have yet to be robustly researched. This paper sets out to address this research gap. We investigated the effects of daily Instagram use on the prevalence of body image issues among adolescent girls. It was hypothesized that daily Instagram use would be associated with an increase in body image concerns and a decrease in self-esteem ratings.

The introduction of a research paper includes several key elements:

  • A hook to catch the reader’s interest
  • Relevant background on the topic
  • Details of your research problem

and your problem statement

  • A thesis statement or research question
  • Sometimes an overview of the paper

Don’t feel that you have to write the introduction first. The introduction is often one of the last parts of the research paper you’ll write, along with the conclusion.

This is because it can be easier to introduce your paper once you’ve already written the body ; you may not have the clearest idea of your arguments until you’ve written them, and things can change during the writing process .

The way you present your research problem in your introduction varies depending on the nature of your research paper . A research paper that presents a sustained argument will usually encapsulate this argument in a thesis statement .

A research paper designed to present the results of empirical research tends to present a research question that it seeks to answer. It may also include a hypothesis —a prediction that will be confirmed or disproved by your research.

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Frantically Speaking

Ultimate 35+ Best Self-Introduction lines (With Examples)

Hrideep barot.

  • Presentation , Public Speaking

self-introduction lines by a man

Hey! I am Hrideep Barot, founder of Frantically Speaking. In this blog I’ll try to give you a comprehensive idea of 35+ best self-introduction lines, so…um..yea, stay tuned?

Now If you are wondering who introduces themselves in such a bizarre way?

We are here to tell you, almost everyone!

Try to remember the first time you were asked to introduce yourself in front of your class, do you think you did a good job?

If yes, kudos to you!

But mostly, we all fumbled, had no idea what to say, and ended our self-introduction with either “Yep that’s it?” or “I guess that is me!”

But as we grow up, we realize how important it is to be able to introduce ourselves in the most dynamic way possible. Because a lot many times these self-introduction lines help you make your first impression and can even make or break your life in terms of job opportunities or relationships.

Self-introductions are your way of introducing yourself to people . It is a gist of what you do? Where do you come from? And everything else that might be important for the listener to continue the conversation with you.

On average, self-introductions are about a minute long. But they can range from about 30 seconds as in the case of an elevator pitch to 2 minutes for interviews.

Before diving into self-introduction lines, let’s first understand a few things which will help you frame the perfect self-introduction lines of yourself!

Why is self-introduction important?

Self-introductions are very important because:

1. Helps you interact with others

Self-introductions are an effective way to begin a conversation with someone you may or may not know.

2. To make a good first impression

As discussed, self-introductions help in communicating and interacting with new people. This would also mean that self-introductions help in forming a good first impression on people if done properly.

3. Let others understand your background

Self-introductions are not just about stating your name and profession but also about your other basic details. These would include the place you come from, your educational background, or your interests. All of these provide an opportunity for the other person to understand you better .

4. Helps to break the ice

Often, on the first day of school or college, we are asked to introduce ourselves. Why do they do it? Because self-introductions act as ice breakers and would help you interact with your classmates effectively later on.

Things to avoid in your self-introduction lines

There are a few things that you must avoid when you are giving a self-introduction. To understand this better let’s take a look at the first few lines of this very blog and point out the mistakes!

1. Lack of information

The first thing that you’ll observe in the above example is how little information you have about the speaker.

There is nothing you know beyond the fact that I am the founder of frantically speaking. And, if you are visiting our website for the first time, you might not even have a clear idea of what frantically speaking offers!

Thus, providing very little information is something that you must avoid at all costs. It steals the opportunity for the readers or listeners to understand where you come from or relate to you.

A revised version of the above example would be something like,

Hey! I am Hrideep Barot, founder of Frantically Speaking, an organization that works to help you be a more confident communicator and public speaker. Self-introductions happen to be one the most crucial things in any form of communication and so here we are with a perfect guide comprising of more than 35 self-introduction lines that you can use the next time you have to introduce yourself! 

2. Filler words

Be it a casual conversation or a professional interview, using filler words shows that you are either unprepared or too nervous, both of which come in the way of effectively communicating.

So, try to avoid using filler words as much as possible

3. Less confidence

Self-introductions are like short quick speeches about the easiest and most convenient topic ever, Your own self!

Be honest with what you are saying and be confident. So, when in the example above, I use “ I’ll try to give a comprehensive idea on 35+ self-introduction lines,” the word try is what shows my doubt or poor confidence in my ability to provide you with the necessary information as it indicates an attempt.

4. Overconfidence

If you think you can overcome the limitation of being underconfident by being a little extra confident, reconsider!

Overconfidence would make you boast about yourself or ramble on and on about yourself , and no one is interested in either.

So, try to be confident in yourself but also consider what others would be expecting from your self-introduction.

To avoid making these mistakes while introducing yourself, you can try to structure your self-introduction prior hand. Or keep these structures in your mind so that you can use them to frame a self-introduction on the spot.

Point, Reason, Example, Point is what PREP stands for. But what does that mean?

Simple, you begin by making a point, then you give a reason for stating that particular point. Now because we are practical beings, we always look for credibility which you give to your listeners by introducing an example that strengthens your reason. Once you have given an example, you might want to restate the point either directly or by paraphrasing to end it on an impactful note.

WWW stands for, Who you are? Why do you do what you do? and Where are you going from here?

An example of WWW for self-introduction is given below

Hey I am Reshma, the founder of fitee, your one stop destination for fitness styling. We belive that it is very important for you to feel confident and comfortable in your clothes when you are working out. I founded the brand after struggling to find good althetisure that would not only be comfortable but also help me look glamnourous. We look forward to reaching every nook and corner of the country and help all the fitnes enthusiats to put their best fit forward!

Check out the YouTube video to get an in-depth understanding of the concepts we just discussed.

Now let’s look at the 35+ self-introduction lines we talked about!

Self-introduction lines

Self-introduction lines for interviews.

Woman being interviewed

Interviews, be it for college or job, require you to follow a professional code of conduct and language . You cannot use slang words or show up to the interview in your t-shirt and shorts.

Understand that self-introduction only adds to the first impression that the interviewer forms of you. Even before you start speaking, a basic judgment has already been made by observing the way you are dressed and the way you greet everyone.

Groom yourself accordingly.

Now when it comes to self-introductions, you must understand that most interviewers start with “Tell me about yourself” . It helps them understand a few basic things like your communication skills and confidence .

The most popular way of structuring self-introductions for interviews is in the PPF format.

PPP stands for Past Present and Future.

1. Give a basic introduction of yourself

Giving a very basic introduction of yourself would look something like

Good morning, I am Aisha Beidi. I recently graduated from XYZ college and have since been working as a Research intern at Researctack. 

2. Talk about your past

When it comes to talking about your past, you are free to very briefly talk about your educational background or your family. You can also talk about some extra courses you had taken or internship experience. An example of this would be

In my first year of college, we were introduced to research writing which I found interesting. After realizing my interest in the field, I took up extra online courses and gained a precise understanding of both quantitative and qualitative research writing and analysis.

3. Talk about how your past shaped your present decision

Linking your past to your present decision would help in maintaining a flow in your self-introduction. An example of this using the above example would be:

The courses I had pursued in my undergraduation made me realize that I’d want to pursue the field further by gaining practical experience. Soon after graduating, I was able to my hands on a wonderful internship with Researctack. I have been working with the team for 3 months now and have specialized in the domain of customer analytics.

4. Talk about your future plans

No, you don’t have to talk about your retirement plans here!

When you talk about your plans make sure that it is in line with the ideologies of the company you are interviewing for.

But I would like to dive deeper in the field of market research analytics with your esteemed organisation. I realize that this opportunity brings with it not only possibility of professional growth but also personal growth which is something I looked forward to.

Self-Introduction lines for freshers

Freshers lined up for their mock interview

As freshers, you might feel that you don’t have enough to talk about when it comes to self-introduction, but that isn’t the case.

A list of things you can include in your self-introduction lines as a fresher is:

  • Hobbies like art, cooking, video editing, and more
  • Academic achievements like being a school topper or class topper
  • Extra-curricular activities like representing your college in competitions and conferences
  • Internship experiences
  • Leadership roles
  • Extra courses

Examples of self-introduction lines for freshers

Good morning, everyone, thank you for this opportunity to introduce myself. I am Jim, and I graduated in business analytics from XYZ College, Bombay. At present, I am interning as a customer analyst with Limelight. Besides Analytics, I have an immense interest in art. I find it easy to communicate effectively and learn anything quickly. Being in the very early phase of my career, I understand the importance of constant learning and I believe that working with your esteemed organization would provide me the opportunity to constantly learn and upskill myself.
Good morning, I am Arya and I recently graduated from XYZ college. Growing up I had always found immense interest in art and crafts. With the support from my parents and teachers in school, I was able to represent my school in various competitions and was also ranked first in a state-level art competition. My love for art motivated me to pursue liberal arts in my bachelor’s. In my first year of college, we were introduced to website designing and I was intrigued by it. I then pursued a few online courses in website designing. Further, I helped design websites for a local bakery store in my locality and the cultural committee of my college. I now look forward to contributing my skills and honing them with your esteemed organization.

Self-introduction lines for Experienced professionals

A professional introducing herself in an interview

If you are an experienced professional, you probably have a lot many things you might want to talk about. However, the task for you is to give a short, quick, and crisp self-introduction.

A list of things you can include in your self-introduction lines as an experienced professional is:

  • Years of work experience
  • Companies you worked with
  • Projects you worked on
  • Leadership positions and responsibilities
  • Statistics or data that prove you are effective in your job. This would also include awards and recognition received.
  • Additional professional courses taken

Examples of self-introduction lines for professionals

Sure, I am Jay D’sa, an MBA graduate of XYZ university batch of 2014. After successful college placements, I was able to work with a renowned Consulting company based out of Bangalore for 5 years. Post that, I landed my job at a start-up in Pune and have been working there for 3 years. I believe the experience and skill set that I was able to gain from working in both, an MNC as well as a start-up will come to its best use in your esteemed organization and am therefore looking forward to being a part of the team.
Good Morning, I am Nysa Jain, an engineering graduate from XYZ College, Mumbai. I began my career as a marketing intern with A company and later switched to the role of an analyst with B company. I have been working here since 2018. Over the years I have gained expertise in analyzing the competitive market nature of the company’s clients, identifying business opportunities, and recommending penetration strategies to elevate the ROI of our clients. My proven market analysis has allowed me to achieve long-term success for my company clients which I believe is in line with your company motto “Providing a guaranteed solution to our clients.”

15 Self-introduction quotes for interviews

Although it isn’t recommended to use quotes in your self-introduction for interviews, if you are still tempted to add a quote in your self-introduction lines, then check out the examples given below!

Quotes are the best ways to give 1 line self-introductions.

Self-introduction quotes you can use while switching careers or finding jobs after a break.

1- I don’t think switching careers is unusual. In fact, I’d like to quote my favorite actress Angelina Jolie here, “ Some people say you are going the wrong way when it’s simply a way of your own .”

2- As Harvey Fierstein said “ Accept no one’s definition of your life but define yourself ,” I was trying to define myself by taking up various courses and understanding the field I really enjoy rather than directly jumping into the job market.

3- “Step out of the history that is holding you back. Step into the new story you are willing to create.” is what Oprah Winfrey said and is my exact answer to your question, “Why am I looking for a career change despite majoring in biology?”

On the other hand, if you are someone who always has a plan, you can use the quotes below to show that you are a very structured person and always plan ahead.

Self-introduction quotes you can use to show you are a structured person

4 – I agree with Derek Sivers that Only dead fish go with the flow and thus like to plan out my work at all times.

5- As Benjamin Franklin said, By Failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail , I always come prepared for my job.

6 – If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else said Yogi Berra and that is something I truly believe and it reflects on my work as well.

Self-introduction quotes to highlight soft skills

Perfectionism

7- I am a core believer in Thomas Edison’s words, “There is a way to do it better — find it.”

8- Abraham Lincoln once said, “Whatever you are, be a good one.” I try to do that every day.

9- Judy Garland had very rightly said, “Always be a first-rate version of yourself and not a second-rate version of someone else.” And all I try to do is be a better version of myself every day.

Not procrastinating or time management

10- I don’t believe in procrastination. In fact, I believe in Thomas Jefferson’s words, “Never put off for tomorrow what you can do today.”

11- John F. Kennedy had rightly said, “The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.”

12- I believe in stitching in time to save nine.

13- “Great things in business are never done by one person; they’re done by a team of people.” said one of the most successful businessmen in the world, Steve Jobs and I don’t think anyone can disagree with that.

14- I believe in personal growth alone but also that of my team members. I’d like to quote Brian Tracy who very beautifully said “Don’t aspire to be the best on the team. Aspire to be the best for the team.”

15- I am very comfortable working in teams, in fact, I agree with Chuck Page when he says, “ A single leaf working alone provides no shade.”

Self-introduction lines for students

A student in uniform

Be it on the first day of your school or while presenting your assignment or even participating in a competition, giving a good self-introduction is very important.

Let us dive directly into examples that can help us understand how to frame the best self-introduction lines for you!

Best self-introduction lines for students

For your first day, try to keep your self-introduction very short and sweet. Do not ramble upon anything or take up too much time as it is likely that other students to have to introduce themselves.

5 self-introduction in 2 lines for students

1- Hello everyone! I am Emily; I am originally from Texas but recently moved here to LA with my family. I love to sing and hope to join the school choir soon. Glad to meet everyone!

2- Hi, My name is Alian, If I had to describe myself in two words, then it would be football and Anime. I am also the captain of the college football team and we are looking for new students to join the team, if you think you’ll be a good fit, let’s chat!

3- Hey, I am Naomi. I am a nerd for psychology and philosophy and look forward to majoring in the subjects. Might as well learn to read your mind by the end of the year!

4- Hello, I am Riya. I grew up in this very school, right from nursery to here in 10th grade. Art is something I find solace in but I mostly indulge In drawing portraits. I am also well versed with every nook and corner of this campus, so let me know if you are looking for the perfect spot to have your lunch!

5- Hey, I am Abram, I’m excited to be a part of this class. I am a foodie and have been told that I am a great listener too. In college, I look forward to making new friends and a ton of memories!

If you are looking for ways in which you can introduce yourself for your school presentation or competition, then jump to the section on self-introduction lines for presentations .

Self-introduction lines for nursery students

Nursery students with their teacher

Teaching your kids how to introduce themselves when they are young as 4 years old can be a task. They might not be able to recall or might not even want to talk in the first place!

What you can do is try to break their self-introductions into small chunks . Make use of words and relations they find easy to remember . Try to not exceed more than 10-15 lines , as it would make it very challenging for them to introduce themselves in the way you might have imagined.

Few things you can add to the self-introduction for nursery students

  • Parents’ names or occupation
  • Name of siblings and class they study in
  • School they study in
  • Their favorite thing. It can be their favorite food, hobby, cartoon character, or even their favorite game.

5 self-introduction lines for nursery students

1- I am Rizal Syed. I am 4 years old. I live with my mom, dad, and older sister. My dad is an engineer. My mom is a lawyer. I study at Monte Carlo Junior kids. I love buzz lightyear. Like buzz, I want to be an astronaut!

2- I am Jenkin. I am 5 years old and study at XYZ school. I live in Mumbai with my mom and dad. Rihaan from school is my best friend. We love playing football.

3- My name is Alisha. I am 5 years old.  I have 2 dads. They work in real estate. We also have a dog. Her name is mini. She is very tiny. I love playing hide and seek. And also love swimming. I want to be a swimmer when I grow up.

4- I am Kelso; I live with my mom and my grandma. My Mother is a teacher. I study at XYZ School. My class teacher is Ms. Rebbecca. I love going to the park and the beach. I want to be a teacher like my mom one day.

5- Hey! I am Milana, I am 6 years old. I live with my mom and dad. Recently I became a big sister. I study at little angels school. I love to sing and dance. Soon I’ll move to the first grade and make new friends. I’m very excited about that!

Self-introduction lines for presentations

Self-introductions for presentations are a little different than the ones we discussed so far.

Self-introductions for presentations require you to use formal language. Also, they are short and quick and don’t usually exceed 30 seconds, as a long self-introduction would mean less time for you to present your topic!

A few things that you must remember before introducing yourself for your presentations are:

Keep it short . Keep it simple and to the point. Make sure to pause after you are done introducing yourself and before you start with your topic.

Give warming to your audience if required .  Warming like “I’m sorry for the voice, I have been a little sick” Or “I’m   sorry but I am facing some network issues and might get logged out in the middle of the presentation in which case do not leave, I’ll join back as soon as possible.”

In case you are presenting in front of a large crowd, you may want to start with an attention grabber like a quote, story , rhetorical question , or even a prolonged pause before jumping into introducing yourself. However, this might not be necessary in the case of small group presentations.

Examples of 5 line self-introductions for presentations

Hello everyone, I am Sasha, a volunteer at climatin. At Climatin our main motto is to try and do our level best to fight human forces and activities that are leading to rapid climatic changes. Climate change is here and in no time it will drown us to death! Today, I am here to inspire you to contribute your tiniest efforts to work towards a better planet for your future generations.
Hello and good evening everyone. I am Neville and this is my team, Aisha, Tom, Harry, and Noman. We are in our senior year majoring in industrial psychology. Today we would like to talk about the 5 main Psychological factors that impact any organization’s overall performance.

Funny self-introduction lines

Giving a funny self-introduction is not for everyone, but if you are really interested in doing so, we’ve got your back!

6 funny self-introduction lines

Self-introduction lines inspired by famous dialogues

1- Hey I am Raj, Naam toh suna hoga (You must’ve heard the name?) (Bollywood movie)

2- Hey, I am Jack, how you Doin? (Friends)

3- If someone has introduced themselves to you and asks you to introduce yourself, you can say “Who am I? You sure you want to know?” (Peter Parker)

Funny pick-up lines

4- Hey, I am Raj. Here I brought you some water. I believe you might need it after constantly running through my dreams.

5- Hey, I am Alisha. I am sad to inform you that I’ll have to report you to the police for stealing my heart from across the room.

6- Hi, I am Zeeshan! I was wondering if you could help me find my inhaler cause you just took my breath away .

Check out one of the funniest self-introductions you will come across on youtube given by a Chinese student!

He begins by taking the most hilarious dig on himself. Check out what he says below

In today’s global economy i’m sure many of you know the product that is m.i.c. Made in China. But today I’d like to introduce you to a new product that is made in China…ME!

How to Introduce yourself to a group?

If introducing yourself to one person was not daunting enough, imagine introducing yourself to a group of people?

The idea behind introducing yourself to a group of people is to connect with them or even be a part of the group.

So the best way to introduce yourself to a group is to briefly talk about yourself and then try to initiate a conversation with them. You can do that in any of the following ways:

1. Talk about relatable topics

Try to understand if there is anything common between you and the group you want to introduce yourself to?

Do you and the group come from the same background? area of study? locality? university? have the same interests?

Once you figure that out, you can then try to add the topic in your self-introduction. This will prompt the others to not only respond to you but will also make them interested in getting to know you.

So for instance if you have to introduce yourself to a group of people outside a concert, you might want to say something like:

Hi, I am Ren. I’ve been following the band for a year now. It just felt like you all have known the band for some time now. How long have you known this band?

2. Talk about generic topics

Talking about generic topics is the most convenient way to give a self-intorduction and begin a conversation with the group.

Generic questions will involve asking questions related to their profession, area of study, Interests, family, and friends.

A few generic questions that you can add to your self-introduction are:

  • What brings you to (the event/place)?
  • Did you go to XYZ school as well?
  • How is the (new place/ job/ school) treating you?
  • What do you do for a living?

3. Add to the Conversation

Now let’s assume you find a group of people talking about something that you have ample knowledge about or interest in. This would make it very easy for you to introduce yourself to the group as you can add to their conversation by putting across a different point of view. You can also simply agree with their already existing views.

An example of adding to the conversation while introducing yourself to a group is given below:

Hello! I’m sorry for interrupting but I overheard your conversation and couldn’t help but add to it. My name is Zack, I am a school counselor at St Stephen High School. As you (points to someone) rightly said, it is indeed getting very difficult for students to cope up with the ever increasing competition and the need for academic validation. But unlike you, I’d suggest giving them enough space and an open, loving enviornment to be vulnerable in rather than being authoritative as it can prove to be more beneficial.

Popular Self-Introduction lines

Famous self-introduction lines or popular self-introduction lines are the ones we use casually or in our everyday conversation.

A few ways in which you can introduce yourself in everyday life are given below:

Introducing yourself in 2 lines to a new colleague or neighbor

Hey there! I am Dan, I live next door. I saw you moved in yesterday so thought I should come over and introduce myself to you. Let me know if there is anything I can help you out with.
Hey, aren’t you the new intern? I am Piyush from the Accounting department by the way. It’s really nice to meet you, hope the office is treating you right!

More informal ways of introducing can sound like “Hey Raj, Riya here, Alisha’s friend!” or “good morning! I don’t think we have met before, I am Ayan by the way!”

Creative ways to introduce yourself

Creative self-introductions are the ones that are online than any other. They are unique and help you stand out. A few out-of-the-box ideas to introduce yourself are given below.

1. Self-Tag

Self tags are a creative way to introduce yourself. It also encourages the other person to make a conversation with you.

A typical self-tag includes writing your name on a sticker and pasting it on your shirt so that everyone can see it.

There are people who make it more creative by wearing t-shirts with a couple of lines that describe them.

An example of a self-introduction line you can get printed on your t-shirt is “Hi! I am James and I love mountain bikes. Do you?”

2. Sing a song

On my first day of college, a classmate of mine ended up singing a song, describing himself and that has stuck with me to this day! Singing a song is a very unusual way of introducing yourself.

But it would obviously require you to have the skills of singing well. Else your self-introduction may turn out to be a disaster.

If you are not good at singing, you can try your hands at spoken word poetry, stand-up, an advertisement with a small jingle in the end , or absolutely anything else that comes easy to you!

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Final Words

Self-introductions form a very crucial part of any form of communication. It is the gist of your own self.

You don’t have to go into great depths to come up with a self-introduction that suits perfectly for you, just having a clear idea of the points you want to highlight. Also, make sure to keep it short and crisp. Don’t make it too lengthy by focusing too much on details or ramblings on and on about yourself.

Understand the situation in which you are introducing yourself. Self-introduction for an interview should be formal and more structured. While for a casual conversation, you can add slang words and maintain a free flow.

Lastly, just be yourself, because that is what self-introductions are all about!

Hrideep Barot

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  1. How to Write an Essay Introduction

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  2. How Do You Write An Introduction to An Assignment? (With Examples of

    Writing an assignment introduction paves the way of how a reader or a teacher perceives an entire assignment and can be considered a face of an assignment. ... Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Winnipeg, and more. You can seek help from them for writing the best introduction for your homework, essays, dissertations, thesis, and research papers ...

  3. How to Write an Introduction, With Examples

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  4. How to Write An Assignment Introduction Like A Pro

    1. Background. The first thing you have to write in an introduction is a brief background of the study. You have to give an overview of your assignment, what your assignment is about, its impact, and its area of study. 2. Context in brief. You have to include a gist of the context of your assignment.

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    Identification of the key issue and research question (s). A brief outline of your theoretical approach. A brief outline of your fieldwork and your professional position. In this post, I'll outline the 5 key components of a strong introduction chapter/section in a mark-earning Henley MBA assignment.

  7. How to Write a Great College Essay Introduction

    Good example. I wiped the sweat from my head and tried to catch my breath. I was nearly there—just one more back tuck and a strong dismount and I'd have nailed a perfect routine. Some students choose to write more broadly about themselves and use some sort of object or metaphor as the focus.

  8. How to Write an Essay Introduction: Structure, Tips, Guide

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  10. How to Write an Introduction Paragraph in 3 Steps

    Intro Paragraph Part 3: The Thesis. The final key part of how to write an intro paragraph is the thesis statement. The thesis statement is the backbone of your introduction: it conveys your argument or point of view on your topic in a clear, concise, and compelling way. The thesis is usually the last sentence of your intro paragraph.

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    Coming up with a great introduction for assignment, make sure that it: Highlights the importance of your subject. Provides a definition of the topic you discuss. Offers the reasoning why you approach your topic. Provides an overview of your methodology or scientific approach. Highlights the major points you would like to discuss.

  12. Writing Introductions and Conclusions

    The introductions are the first part of your assignment that the reader encounters, so it needs to make a good impression and set the scene for what follows. Your introduction is about 10% of the total word count. It can be difficult to think what that first opening sentence should be, or what an introduction should include.

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    Introduction #1: The Quote. I chose to open this post with a quote not because I'm a fan of Catcher in the Rye. Truth be told, I'm not the biggest Catcher fan (despite my personal appreciation for Salinger's immense literary talent and commitment to being a hardcore recluse ). True dat. Image via XXY Magazine.

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    The most important aspects: Outline and Introduction. Preparation is the key to success, especially when it comes to academic assignments. It is recommended to always write an outline before you start writing the actual assignment. The outline should include the main points of discussion, which will keep you focused throughout the work and will ...

  15. Introductions

    Gordon Taylor, A Student's Writing Guide. Your introduction is the first thing your marker will read and should be approximately 10% of your word count. Within the first minute they should know if your essay is going to be a good one or not. An introduction has several components but the most important of these are the last two we give here.

  16. Self-introduction for Students [With Sample Intros]

    1. Listen to other intros. Listen to intros that come before yours. If you can refer to someone else's point or two seamlessly in your intro, you'll impress people around. 2. Practice, but don't cram. People often go blank on some of the points or get nervous when they stand up to speak.

  17. 15 foolproof tips for writing a great assignment

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    Some people find it easiest to write the introduction first, whereas others leave it until the end. Neither approach is right or wrong, so write the assignment in whichever order feels best for you. The introduction might be up to around 10% of the word count (e.g. up to 200 words for a 2000 word assignment). Don't forget your conclusion

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    Use your instructor's introduction as a guide. This is a good model of what information your professor thinks is important to share. Take a closer look and use it as an example of what to include in your introduction and how long it should be. Don't forget to respond to your classmates! You won't find an instant connection with everyone, but ...

  23. Ultimate 35+ Best Self-Introduction lines (With Examples)

    Examples of self-introduction lines for freshers. 1 -. Good morning, everyone, thank you for this opportunity to introduce myself. I am Jim, and I graduated in business analytics from XYZ College, Bombay. At present, I am interning as a customer analyst with Limelight.