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What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

  • Carmine Gallo

company presentation guidelines

Five tips to set yourself apart.

Never underestimate the power of great communication. It can help you land the job of your dreams, attract investors to back your idea, or elevate your stature within your organization. But while there are plenty of good speakers in the world, you can set yourself apart out by being the person who can deliver something great over and over. Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired together are more memorable); don’t underestimate the power of your voice (raise and lower it for emphasis); give your audience something extra (unexpected moments will grab their attention); rehearse (the best speakers are the best because they practice — a lot).

I was sitting across the table from a Silicon Valley CEO who had pioneered a technology that touches many of our lives — the flash memory that stores data on smartphones, digital cameras, and computers. He was a frequent guest on CNBC and had been delivering business presentations for at least 20 years before we met. And yet, the CEO wanted to sharpen his public speaking skills.

company presentation guidelines

  • Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of 10 books translated into 40 languages. Gallo is the author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman  (St. Martin’s Press).

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Blog Beginner Guides

How To Make a Good Presentation [A Complete Guide]

By Krystle Wong , Jul 20, 2023

How to make a good presentation

A top-notch presentation possesses the power to drive action. From winning stakeholders over and conveying a powerful message to securing funding — your secret weapon lies within the realm of creating an effective presentation .  

Being an excellent presenter isn’t confined to the boardroom. Whether you’re delivering a presentation at work, pursuing an academic career, involved in a non-profit organization or even a student, nailing the presentation game is a game-changer.

In this article, I’ll cover the top qualities of compelling presentations and walk you through a step-by-step guide on how to give a good presentation. Here’s a little tip to kick things off: for a headstart, check out Venngage’s collection of free presentation templates . They are fully customizable, and the best part is you don’t need professional design skills to make them shine!

These valuable presentation tips cater to individuals from diverse professional backgrounds, encompassing business professionals, sales and marketing teams, educators, trainers, students, researchers, non-profit organizations, public speakers and presenters. 

No matter your field or role, these tips for presenting will equip you with the skills to deliver effective presentations that leave a lasting impression on any audience.

Click to jump ahead:

What are the 10 qualities of a good presentation?

Step-by-step guide on how to prepare an effective presentation, 9 effective techniques to deliver a memorable presentation, faqs on making a good presentation, how to create a presentation with venngage in 5 steps.

When it comes to giving an engaging presentation that leaves a lasting impression, it’s not just about the content — it’s also about how you deliver it. Wondering what makes a good presentation? Well, the best presentations I’ve seen consistently exhibit these 10 qualities:

1. Clear structure

No one likes to get lost in a maze of information. Organize your thoughts into a logical flow, complete with an introduction, main points and a solid conclusion. A structured presentation helps your audience follow along effortlessly, leaving them with a sense of satisfaction at the end.

Regardless of your presentation style , a quality presentation starts with a clear roadmap. Browse through Venngage’s template library and select a presentation template that aligns with your content and presentation goals. Here’s a good presentation example template with a logical layout that includes sections for the introduction, main points, supporting information and a conclusion: 

company presentation guidelines

2. Engaging opening

Hook your audience right from the start with an attention-grabbing statement, a fascinating question or maybe even a captivating anecdote. Set the stage for a killer presentation!

The opening moments of your presentation hold immense power – check out these 15 ways to start a presentation to set the stage and captivate your audience.

3. Relevant content

Make sure your content aligns with their interests and needs. Your audience is there for a reason, and that’s to get valuable insights. Avoid fluff and get straight to the point, your audience will be genuinely excited.

4. Effective visual aids

Picture this: a slide with walls of text and tiny charts, yawn! Visual aids should be just that—aiding your presentation. Opt for clear and visually appealing slides, engaging images and informative charts that add value and help reinforce your message.

With Venngage, visualizing data takes no effort at all. You can import data from CSV or Google Sheets seamlessly and create stunning charts, graphs and icon stories effortlessly to showcase your data in a captivating and impactful way.

company presentation guidelines

5. Clear and concise communication

Keep your language simple, and avoid jargon or complicated terms. Communicate your ideas clearly, so your audience can easily grasp and retain the information being conveyed. This can prevent confusion and enhance the overall effectiveness of the message. 

6. Engaging delivery

Spice up your presentation with a sprinkle of enthusiasm! Maintain eye contact, use expressive gestures and vary your tone of voice to keep your audience glued to the edge of their seats. A touch of charisma goes a long way!

7. Interaction and audience engagement

Turn your presentation into an interactive experience — encourage questions, foster discussions and maybe even throw in a fun activity. Engaged audiences are more likely to remember and embrace your message.

Transform your slides into an interactive presentation with Venngage’s dynamic features like pop-ups, clickable icons and animated elements. Engage your audience with interactive content that lets them explore and interact with your presentation for a truly immersive experience.

company presentation guidelines

8. Effective storytelling

Who doesn’t love a good story? Weaving relevant anecdotes, case studies or even a personal story into your presentation can captivate your audience and create a lasting impact. Stories build connections and make your message memorable.

A great presentation background is also essential as it sets the tone, creates visual interest and reinforces your message. Enhance the overall aesthetics of your presentation with these 15 presentation background examples and captivate your audience’s attention.

9. Well-timed pacing

Pace your presentation thoughtfully with well-designed presentation slides, neither rushing through nor dragging it out. Respect your audience’s time and ensure you cover all the essential points without losing their interest.

10. Strong conclusion

Last impressions linger! Summarize your main points and leave your audience with a clear takeaway. End your presentation with a bang , a call to action or an inspiring thought that resonates long after the conclusion.

In-person presentations aside, acing a virtual presentation is of paramount importance in today’s digital world. Check out this guide to learn how you can adapt your in-person presentations into virtual presentations . 

Peloton Pitch Deck - Conclusion

Preparing an effective presentation starts with laying a strong foundation that goes beyond just creating slides and notes. One of the quickest and best ways to make a presentation would be with the help of a good presentation software . 

Otherwise, let me walk you to how to prepare for a presentation step by step and unlock the secrets of crafting a professional presentation that sets you apart.

1. Understand the audience and their needs

Before you dive into preparing your masterpiece, take a moment to get to know your target audience. Tailor your presentation to meet their needs and expectations , and you’ll have them hooked from the start!

2. Conduct thorough research on the topic

Time to hit the books (or the internet)! Don’t skimp on the research with your presentation materials — dive deep into the subject matter and gather valuable insights . The more you know, the more confident you’ll feel in delivering your presentation.

3. Organize the content with a clear structure

No one wants to stumble through a chaotic mess of information. Outline your presentation with a clear and logical flow. Start with a captivating introduction, follow up with main points that build on each other and wrap it up with a powerful conclusion that leaves a lasting impression.

Delivering an effective business presentation hinges on captivating your audience, and Venngage’s professionally designed business presentation templates are tailor-made for this purpose. With thoughtfully structured layouts, these templates enhance your message’s clarity and coherence, ensuring a memorable and engaging experience for your audience members.

Don’t want to build your presentation layout from scratch? pick from these 5 foolproof presentation layout ideas that won’t go wrong. 

company presentation guidelines

4. Develop visually appealing and supportive visual aids

Spice up your presentation with eye-catching visuals! Create slides that complement your message, not overshadow it. Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words, but that doesn’t mean you need to overload your slides with text.

Well-chosen designs create a cohesive and professional look, capturing your audience’s attention and enhancing the overall effectiveness of your message. Here’s a list of carefully curated PowerPoint presentation templates and great background graphics that will significantly influence the visual appeal and engagement of your presentation.

5. Practice, practice and practice

Practice makes perfect — rehearse your presentation and arrive early to your presentation to help overcome stage fright. Familiarity with your material will boost your presentation skills and help you handle curveballs with ease.

6. Seek feedback and make necessary adjustments

Don’t be afraid to ask for help and seek feedback from friends and colleagues. Constructive criticism can help you identify blind spots and fine-tune your presentation to perfection.

With Venngage’s real-time collaboration feature , receiving feedback and editing your presentation is a seamless process. Group members can access and work on the presentation simultaneously and edit content side by side in real-time. Changes will be reflected immediately to the entire team, promoting seamless teamwork.

Venngage Real Time Collaboration

7. Prepare for potential technical or logistical issues

Prepare for the unexpected by checking your equipment, internet connection and any other potential hiccups. If you’re worried that you’ll miss out on any important points, you could always have note cards prepared. Remember to remain focused and rehearse potential answers to anticipated questions.

8. Fine-tune and polish your presentation

As the big day approaches, give your presentation one last shine. Review your talking points, practice how to present a presentation and make any final tweaks. Deep breaths — you’re on the brink of delivering a successful presentation!

In competitive environments, persuasive presentations set individuals and organizations apart. To brush up on your presentation skills, read these guides on how to make a persuasive presentation and tips to presenting effectively . 

company presentation guidelines

Whether you’re an experienced presenter or a novice, the right techniques will let your presentation skills soar to new heights!

From public speaking hacks to interactive elements and storytelling prowess, these 9 effective presentation techniques will empower you to leave a lasting impression on your audience and make your presentations unforgettable.

1. Confidence and positive body language

Positive body language instantly captivates your audience, making them believe in your message as much as you do. Strengthen your stage presence and own that stage like it’s your second home! Stand tall, shoulders back and exude confidence. 

2. Eye contact with the audience

Break down that invisible barrier and connect with your audience through their eyes. Maintaining eye contact when giving a presentation builds trust and shows that you’re present and engaged with them.

3. Effective use of hand gestures and movement

A little movement goes a long way! Emphasize key points with purposeful gestures and don’t be afraid to walk around the stage. Your energy will be contagious!

4. Utilize storytelling techniques

Weave the magic of storytelling into your presentation. Share relatable anecdotes, inspiring success stories or even personal experiences that tug at the heartstrings of your audience. Adjust your pitch, pace and volume to match the emotions and intensity of the story. Varying your speaking voice adds depth and enhances your stage presence.

company presentation guidelines

5. Incorporate multimedia elements

Spice up your presentation with a dash of visual pizzazz! Use slides, images and video clips to add depth and clarity to your message. Just remember, less is more—don’t overwhelm them with information overload. 

Turn your presentations into an interactive party! Involve your audience with questions, polls or group activities. When they actively participate, they become invested in your presentation’s success. Bring your design to life with animated elements. Venngage allows you to apply animations to icons, images and text to create dynamic and engaging visual content.

6. Utilize humor strategically

Laughter is the best medicine—and a fantastic presentation enhancer! A well-placed joke or lighthearted moment can break the ice and create a warm atmosphere , making your audience more receptive to your message.

7. Practice active listening and respond to feedback

Be attentive to your audience’s reactions and feedback. If they have questions or concerns, address them with genuine interest and respect. Your responsiveness builds rapport and shows that you genuinely care about their experience.

company presentation guidelines

8. Apply the 10-20-30 rule

Apply the 10-20-30 presentation rule and keep it short, sweet and impactful! Stick to ten slides, deliver your presentation within 20 minutes and use a 30-point font to ensure clarity and focus. Less is more, and your audience will thank you for it!

9. Implement the 5-5-5 rule

Simplicity is key. Limit each slide to five bullet points, with only five words per bullet point and allow each slide to remain visible for about five seconds. This rule keeps your presentation concise and prevents information overload.

Simple presentations are more engaging because they are easier to follow. Summarize your presentations and keep them simple with Venngage’s gallery of simple presentation templates and ensure that your message is delivered effectively across your audience.

company presentation guidelines

1. How to start a presentation?

To kick off your presentation effectively, begin with an attention-grabbing statement or a powerful quote. Introduce yourself, establish credibility and clearly state the purpose and relevance of your presentation.

2. How to end a presentation?

For a strong conclusion, summarize your talking points and key takeaways. End with a compelling call to action or a thought-provoking question and remember to thank your audience and invite any final questions or interactions.

3. How to make a presentation interactive?

To make your presentation interactive, encourage questions and discussion throughout your talk. Utilize multimedia elements like videos or images and consider including polls, quizzes or group activities to actively involve your audience.

In need of inspiration for your next presentation? I’ve got your back! Pick from these 120+ presentation ideas, topics and examples to get started. 

Creating a stunning presentation with Venngage is a breeze with our user-friendly drag-and-drop editor and professionally designed templates for all your communication needs. 

Here’s how to make a presentation in just 5 simple steps with the help of Venngage:

Step 1: Sign up for Venngage for free using your email, Gmail or Facebook account or simply log in to access your account. 

Step 2: Pick a design from our selection of free presentation templates (they’re all created by our expert in-house designers).

Step 3: Make the template your own by customizing it to fit your content and branding. With Venngage’s intuitive drag-and-drop editor, you can easily modify text, change colors and adjust the layout to create a unique and eye-catching design.

Step 4: Elevate your presentation by incorporating captivating visuals. You can upload your images or choose from Venngage’s vast library of high-quality photos, icons and illustrations. 

Step 5: Upgrade to a premium or business account to export your presentation in PDF and print it for in-person presentations or share it digitally for free!

By following these five simple steps, you’ll have a professionally designed and visually engaging presentation ready in no time. With Venngage’s user-friendly platform, your presentation is sure to make a lasting impression. So, let your creativity flow and get ready to shine in your next presentation!

Home Blog Business Business Presentation: The Ultimate Guide to Making Powerful Presentations (+ Examples)

Business Presentation: The Ultimate Guide to Making Powerful Presentations (+ Examples)

Business Presentation Ultimate Guide plus examples

A business presentation is a purpose-led summary of key information about your company’s plans, products, or practices, designed for either internal or external audiences. Project proposals, HR policy presentations, investors briefings are among the few common types of presentations. 

Compelling business presentations are key to communicating important ideas, persuading others, and introducing new offerings to the world. Hence, why business presentation design is one of the most universal skills for any professional. 

This guide teaches you how to design and deliver excellent business presentations. Plus, breaks down some best practices from business presentation examples by popular companies like Google, Pinterest, and Amazon among others! 

3 General Types of Business Presentations

A business presentation can be given for a number of reasons. Respectively, they differ a lot in terms of content and purpose. 

But overall, all types of business presentations can be classified as:

  • Informative
  • Persuasive 
  • Supporting 

Informative Business Presentation 

As the name suggests, the purpose of an informative presentation is to discern the knowledge you have — explain what you know. It’s the most common type of business presentation out there. So you have probably prepared such at least several times. 

Examples of informative presentations:

  • Team briefings presentation 
  • Annual stakeholder report 
  • Quarterly business reviews
  • Business portfolio presentation
  • Business plan presentation
  • Project presentation

Helpful templates from SlideModel:

  • Business plan PowerPoint template
  • Business review PowerPoint template
  • Project proposal PowerPoint template
  • Corporate annual report template

Persuasive Business Presentation 

The goal of this type of presentation is to persuade your audience of your point of view — convince them of what you believe is right. Developing business presentations of this caliber requires a bit more copywriting mastery, as well as expertise in public speaking . Unlike an informative business presentation, your goal here is to sway the audience’s opinions and prompt them towards the desired action. 

Examples of persuasive presentations:

  • Pitch deck/investor presentations
  • Sales presentation  
  • Business case presentation 
  • Free business proposal presentation
  • Business proposal PowerPoint template
  • Pitch deck PowerPoint template
  • Account Plan PowerPoint template

Supporting Business Presentation 

This category of business PowerPoint presentations is meant to facilitate decision-making — explain how we can get something done. The underlying purpose here is to communicate the general “action plan”. Then break down the necessary next steps for bringing it to life. 

Examples of supporting presentations:

  • Roadmap presentation
  • Project vision presentation 
  • After Action Review presentation 
  • Standard operating procedure (SOP) PowerPoint template 
  • Strategy map PowerPoint template 
  • After action review (ARR) PowerPoint template 

What Should Be Included in a Business Presentation?

Overall, the content of your business presentation will differ depending on its purpose and type. However, at the very minimum, all business presentations should include:

  • Introductory slide 
  • Agenda/purpose slide
  • Main information or Content slides
  • Key Takeaways slides
  • Call-to-action/next steps slides

We further distill business presentation design and writing best practices in the next section (plus, provide several actionable business PowerPoint presentation examples!). 

How to Make a Business Presentation: Actionable Tips

A business presentation consists of two parts — a slide deck and a verbal speech. In this section, we provide tips and strategies for nailing your deck design. 

1. Get Your Presentation Opening Right 

The first slides of your presentation make or break your success. Why? By failing to frame the narrative and set the scene for the audience from the very beginning, you will struggle to keep their interest throughout the presentation. 

You have several ways of how to start a business presentation:

  • Use a general informative opening — a summative slide, sharing the agenda and main points of the discussion. 
  • Go for a story opening — a more creative, personal opening, aimed at pulling the audience into your story. 
  • Try a dramatic opening — a less apparent and attention-grabbing opening technique, meant to pique the audience’s interest. 

Standard Informative Opening 

Most business presentation examples you see start with a general, informative slide such as an Agenda, Problem Statement, or Company Introduction. That’s the “classic” approach. 

To manage the audience’s expectations and prepare them for what’s coming next, you can open your presentation with one or two slides stating:

  • The topic of your presentation — a one-sentence overview is enough. 
  • Persuasive hook, suggesting what’s in it for the audience and why they should pay attention. 
  • Your authority — the best technique to establish your credibility in a business presentation is to share your qualifications and experience upfront to highlight why you are worth listening to. 

Opening best suited for: Formal business presentations such as annual reports and supporting presentations to your team/business stakeholders. 

Story Opening 

Did you ever notice that most TED talks start with a quick personal story? The benefit of this presenting technique is that it enables speakers to establish quick rapport and hold the listener’s attention. 

Here’s how Nancy Duarte, author of “Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations” book and TED presenter, recommends opening a presentation: 

You know, here’s the status quo, here’s what’s going on. And then you need to compare that to what could be. You need to make that gap as big as possible, because there is this commonplace of the status quo, and you need to contrast that with the loftiness of your idea. 

Storytelling , like no other tool, helps transpose the audience into the right mindset and get concentrated on the subject you are about to discuss. A story also elicits emotions, which can be a powerful ally when giving persuasive presentations. In the article how to start a presentation , we explore this in more detail.

Opening best suited for: Personal and business pitches, sales presentations, other types of persuasive presentations. 

Dramatic Opening 

Another common technique is opening your presentation with a major statement, sometimes of controversial nature. This can be a shocking statistic, complex rhetoric question, or even a provocative, contrarian statement, challenging the audience’s beliefs. 

Using a dramatic opening helps secure the people’s attention and capture their interest. You can then use storytelling to further drill down your main ideas. 

If you are an experienced public speaker, you can also strengthen your speech with some unexpected actions. That’s what Bill Gates does when giving presentations. In a now-iconic 2009 TED talk about malaria, mid-presentation Gates suddenly reveals that he actually brought a bunch of mosquitoes with him. He cracks open a jar with non-malaria-infected critters to the audience’s surprise. His dramatic actions, paired with a passionate speech made a mighty impression. 

Opening best suited for: Marketing presentations, customer demos, training presentations, public speeches. 

Further reading: How to start a presentation: tips and examples. 

2. Get Your PowerPoint Design Right

Surely, using professional business PowerPoint templates already helps immensely with presentation deck design since you don’t need to fuss over slide layout, font selection, or iconography. 

Even so, you’ll still need to customize your template(s) to make them on brand and better suited to the presentation you’re about to deliver. Below are our best presentation design tips to give your deck an extra oomph. 

Use Images, Instead of Bullet Points 

If you have ever watched Steve Jobs’s presentations, you may have noticed that he never used bullet-point lists. Weird right? Because using bullet points is the most universal advice in presentation design. 

company presentation guidelines

But there’s a valid scientific reason why Jobs favored images over bullet-point texts. Researchers found that information delivered in visuals is better retained than words alone. This is called the “ pictorial superiority effect ”. As John Medina, a molecular biologist, further explains :

“Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%.”

So if your goal is to improve the memorability of your presentation, always replace texts with images and visualizations when it makes sense. 

Fewer Slides is Better

No matter the value, a long PowerPoint presentation becomes tiring at some point. People lose focus and stop retaining the information. Thus, always take some extra time to trim the fluff and consolidate some repetitive ideas within your presentation. 

For instance, at McKinsey new management consultants are trained to cut down the number of slides in client presentations. In fact, one senior partner insists on replacing every 20 slides with only two slides . Doing so prompts you to focus on the gist — the main business presentation ideas you need to communicate and drop filler statements. 

Here are several quick tips to shorten your slides:

  • Use a three-arc structure featuring a clear beginning (setup), main narrative (confrontation), ending (resolution). Drop the ideas that don’t fit into either of these. 
  • Write as you tweet. Create short, on-point text blurbs of under 156 symbols, similar to what you’d share on Twitter. 
  • Contextualize your numbers. Present any relevant statistics in a context, relevant to the listeners. Turn longer stats into data visualizations for easier cognition. 

Consistency is Key 

In a solid business presentation, each slide feels like part of the connecting story. To achieve such consistency apply the same visual style and retain the same underlying message throughout your entire presentation.

Use the same typography, color scheme, and visual styles across the deck. But when you need to accentuate a transition to a new topic (e.g. move from a setup to articulating the main ideas), add some new visual element to signify the slight change in the narrative. 

Further reading: 23 PowerPoint Presentation Tips for Creating Engaging and Interactive Presentations

3. Make Your Closure Memorable 

We best remember the information shared last. So make those business presentation takeaways stick in the audience’s memory. We have three strategies for that. 

Use the Rule of Three 

The Rule of Three is a literary concept, suggesting that we best remember and like ideas and concepts when they are presented in threes. 

Many famous authors and speakers use this technique:

  • “Duty – Honor – Country. Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, and what you will be” . Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
  • “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness” are the unalienable rights of all humans that governments are meant to protect.” Thomas Jefferson 

The Rule of Three works because three is the maximum number of items most people can remember on their first attempt. Likewise, such pairings create a short, familiar structure that is easy to remember for our brains. 

Try the Title Close Technique

Another popular presentation closing technique is “Title Close” — going back to the beginning of your narrative and reiterating your main idea (title) in a form of a takeaway. Doing so helps the audience better retain your core message since it’s repeated at least two times. Plus, it brings a sense of closure — a feel-good state our brains love. Also, a brief one-line closure is more memorable than a lengthy summary and thus better retained. 

Ask a Question 

If you want to keep the conversation going once you are done presenting, you can conclude your presentation with a general question you’d like the audience to answer.

Alternatively, you can also encourage the members to pose questions to you. The latter is better suited for informational presentations where you’d like to further discuss some of the matters and secure immediate feedback. 

Try adding an interactive element like a QR code closing your presentation with a QR code and having a clear CTA helps you leverage the power of sharing anything you would like to share with your clients. QR codes can be customized to look alike your brand. With the help of the best QR code generator , you can create a QR code that’s secure and trackable.

12 Business Presentation Examples and What Makes Them Great 

Now that we equipped you with the general knowledge on how to make a presentation for business, let’s take a look at how other presenters are coping with this job and what lessons you can take away from them. 

1. N26 Digital Bank Pitch Deck 

The Future of Banking by N26. An example of a Business Presentation with a nice cover image.

This is a fine business pitch presentation example, hitting all the best practices. The deck opens with a big shocking statement that most Millennials would rather go to the dentist than step into a bank branch. 

Then it proceeds to discuss the company’s solution to the above — a fully digital bank with a paperless account opening process, done in 8 minutes. After communicating the main product features and value proposition, the deck further conceptualizes what traction the product got so far using data visualizations. The only thing it lacks is a solid call-to-action for closing slides as the current ending feels a bit abrupt. 

2. WeWork Pitch Deck

Business Presentation Example by WeWork

For a Series D round, WeWork went with a more formal business presentation. It starts with laying down the general company information and then transitions to explaining their business model, current market conditions, and the company’s position on the market.

The good thing about this deck is that they quantify their business growth prospects and value proposition. The likely gains for investors are shown in concrete numbers. However, those charts go one after another in a row, so it gets a bit challenging to retain all data points. 

The last part of their presentation is focused on a new offering, “We Live”. It explains why the team seeks funds to bring it to life. Likewise, they back their reasoning with market size statistics, sample projects, and a five-year revenue forecast. 

3. Redfin Investor Presentation 

Redfin Investor Presentation for Business. A Technology-Powered Real Estate Company.

If you are looking for a “text-light” business presentation example, Redfin’s investor deck is up to your alley. This simple deck expertly uses iconography, charts, and graphs to break down the company’s business model, value proposition, market share, and competitive advantages over similar startups. For number-oriented investors, this is a great deck design to use. 

4. Google Ready Together Presentation 

This isn’t quite the standard business presentation example per se. But rather an innovative way to create engaging, interactive presentations of customer case studies .

Interactive Online Presentation example by Google, from Customer Insights.  Google Ready Together Presentation.

The short deck features a short video clip from a Google client, 7-11, explaining how they used the company’s marketing technology to digitally transform their operations and introduce a greater degree of marketing automation . The narrated video parts are interrupted by slides featuring catchy stats, contextualizing issues other businesses are facing. Then transitions to explaining through the words of 7-11 CMO, how Google’s technology is helping them overcome the stated shortcomings.

5. Salesforce Business Presentation Example 

This is a great example of an informational presentation, made by the Salesforce team to share their research on customer experience (CX) with prospects and existing customers.

Business Presentation Example by Service Salesforce on How to Know Your Customer. A look into the Future of Customer Experience.

The slide deck errs on the lengthier side with 58 slides total. But bigger topics are broken down and reinforced through bite-sized statistics and quotes from the company leadership. They are also packaging the main tips into memorable formulas, itemized lists, and tables. Overall, this deck is a great example of how you can build a compelling narrative using different statistics. 

6. Mastercard Business Presentation

This slide deck from Mastercard instantly captures the audience’s attention with unusual background images and major data points on the growth of populations, POS systems, and payment methods used in the upcoming decade.

Business Presentation by MasterCard on Technology and Payment solutions. The Unfinished Revolution.

Perhaps to offset the complexity of the subject, Mastercard chose to sprinkle in some humor in presentation texts and used comic-style visuals to supplement that. However, all their animations are made in a similar style, creating a good sense of continuity in design. They are also using colors to signify the transition from one part of the presentation to another. 

In the second part, the slide deck focuses on distilling the core message of what businesses need to do to remain competitive in the new payments landscape. The team presents what they have been working on to expand the payment ecosystem. Then concludes with a “title close” styled call-to-action, mirroring the presentation title.

7. McKinsey Diversity & Inclusion Presentation 

This fresh business slide deck from McKinsey is a great reference point for making persuasive business presentations on complex topics such as D&I. First, it recaps the main definitions of the discussed concepts — diversity, equity, and inclusion — to ensure alignment with the audience members. 

Business Presentation Example by McKinsey Company on Diversity Wins: How inclusion matters.

Next, the business presentation deck focuses on the severity and importance of the issue for businesses, represented through a series of graphs and charts. After articulating the “why”, the narrative switches to “how” — how leaders can benefit from investment in D&I. The main points are further backed with data and illustrated via examples. 

8. Accenture Presentation for the Energy Sector

Similar to McKinsey, Accenture keeps its slide deck on a short. Yet the team packs a punch within each slide through using a mix of fonts, graphical elements, and color for highlighting the core information. The presentation copy is on a longer side, prompting the audience to dwell on reading the slides. But perhaps this was meant by design as the presentation was also distributed online — via the company blog and social media. 

Business Presentation Example by Accenture on Accelerating Innovation in Energy.

The last several slides of the presentation deck focus on articulating the value Accenture can deliver for their clients in the Energy sector. They expertly break down their main value proposition and key service lines, plus quantify the benefits. 

9. Amazon Web Services (AWS) Technical Presentation 

Giving an engaging technical presentation isn’t an easy task. You have to balance the number of details you reveal on your slides to prevent overwhelm, while also making sure that you don’t leave out any crucial deets. This technical presentation from AWS does great in both departments. 

Business Presentation created by AWS explaining how to build forecasting using ML/DL algorithms.

First, you get entertained with a quick overview of Amazon’s progress in machine learning (ML) forecasting capabilities over the last decade. Then introduced to the main tech offering. The deck further explains what you need to get started with Amazon Forecast — e.g. dataset requirements, supported forecasting scenarios, available forecasting models, etc. 

The second half of the presentation provides a quick training snippet on configuring Amazon SageMaker to start your first project. The step-by-step instructions are coherent and well-organized, making the reader excited to test-drive the product. 

10. Snapchat Company Presentation

Snapchat’s business model presentation is on a funkier, more casual side, reflective of the company’s overall brand and positioning. After briefly recapping what they do, the slide deck switches to discussing the company’s financials and revenue streams.

company presentation guidelines

This business slide deck by Snap Inc. itself is rather simplistic and lacks fancy design elements. But it has a strong unified theme of showing the audience Snapchat’s position on the market and projected vector of business development. 

11. Visa Business Acquisition Presentation 

VISA Acquisition of Plaid Business presentation.

If you are working on a business plan or M&A presentation for stakeholders of your own, this example from Visa will be helpful. The presentation deck expertly breaks down the company’s rationale for purchasing Plaid and subsequent plans for integrating the startup into their business ecosystem. 

The business deck recaps why the Plaid acquisition is a solid strategic decision by highlighting the total addressable market they could dive into post-deal. Then it details Plaid’s competitive strengths. The slide deck then sums up all the monetary and indirect gains Visa could reap as an acquirer. 

12. Pinterest Earnings Report Presentation 

Pinterest Business Presentation Example with Annual Report

Annual reports and especially earnings presentations might not be the most exciting types of documents to work on, but they have immense strategic value. Hence, there’s little room for ambiguities or mistakes. 

In twelve slides, this business presentation from Pinterest clearly communicates the big picture of the company’s finance in 2021. All the key numbers are represented as featured quotes in the sidebar with diagrams further showcasing the earning and spending dynamics. Overall, the data is easy to interpret even for non-finance folks. 

To Conclude 

With these business presentation design tips, presentation templates , and examples, you can go from overwhelmed to confident about your next presentation design in a matter of hours. Focus on creating a rough draft first using a template. Then work on nailing your opening slide sequence and shortening the texts in the main part of your presentation when needed. Make sure that each slide serves a clear purpose and communicates important details. To make your business presentation deck more concise, remove anything that does not pertain to the topic. 

Finally, once you are done, share your business presentation with other team members to get their feedback and reiterate the final design.

company presentation guidelines

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8 Tips for a Winning Company Presentation

A company presentation is a vital tool for management and sales departments . This type of presentation plays a huge part in promoting the corporate brand – it’s layout and structure need to be professional and convincing . In this article, we’ll show you what goes into a successful company presentation.

Your company presentation in PowerPoint 

Today’s dynamic market requires companies to adapt and continually seek out new partnerships and clients. Creating a compelling and versatile presentation of products and services is essential . Here are 8 useful tips for designing your company presentation in PowerPoint .

First impressions are everything – and that goes for company presentations, too. It takes people a fraction of a second to form an initial opinion and all too often, that initial opinion is hard to change. This makes it all the more important to set the right tone at introductory meetings.

At face value, a company presentation serves the simple purpose of presenting a company in the best possible light . You want to list key figures and detail services, but you also want to convey emotions and mission statements. The other party wants to learn about who you are .

Your company presentation needs to be tailored to your brand, your business, your products and your services . Although there is no ideal blueprint for a company presentation, there are principles and rules to guide the process.

Company Presentation

Tip 1: Preparation and design: The first impression counts

A company presentation is often the first step in connecting with important stakeholders . It lays the groundwork for further discussions and meetings and other objectives, such as closing a contract, establishing a partnership or inviting the client to a follow-up meeting.

You don’t get a second chance to make a first impression and your company presentation is no exception to this rule. To truly be effective, every presentation needs a professional design . And that starts with the corporate design (CD) .

Take a look at your existing company presentation. Is it consistent with your CD?

If not, you need to tailor the font, color scheme and visual language to your corporate identity. Establishing a consistent and meaningful design will help you make a lasting impression on potential clients and partners.

In addition, high-quality images are a must. Professional preparation and great design mean being able to win over even the most critical managing director or the most demanding customers.

✔ Keep the design of your company presentation timeless, elegant and appealing . Avoid overwhelming your audience with cluttered slides and too many bells and whistles. Clean and modern flat design (a large selection of graphics, icons and diagrams can be found here ),as well as isometric design (found here ) are currently on trend.

Tip 2: The 20-minute rule. Your audience’s time is precious!

Most executives and leader are pressed for time and as a result, attention spans can be short. For this very reason, keep your company presentation short:

Spend a maximum of 20 to 25 minutes on the introduction section (“about us”). Then it’s time to get to the point and present your business concept, specific offer, products and/or services in detail. Better yet, keep you presentation short and start a dialogue .

Studies have proven that during a presentation, attention levels drop sharply after just 15 minutes . Your audience will be grateful that you value their time. In most cases, they already know more about your company than you think.

Company Presentation

Tip 3: Structure: What belongs in a professional company presentation?

The art of a successful company presentation is, among other things, to condense the most important content of your business plan (business model, market, strategy, finances, etc.) onto a few slides . But it’s even more important to know which facts are truly relevant to your target audience and which are not.

1. Always start by answering the most important W questions :

Who? Contacts, management, staff, partner companies

What? Services, products, etc.

Where? Locations, industries/markets, business areas

How? Goal, vision, mission statement

Why? Advantages for new clients or partner companies

Emphasize the “What?” and ” Why?” of your presentation; this is what your audience will be most interested in.

2. Competition is fierce. Most markets are flooded with competitors and attractive alternatives. That’s why unique selling propositions and individual advantages are so important. What makes you special? Why are you better at meeting the needs of your audience?

3. Always include references from satisfied clients and customers . Concrete references help your audience better understand why your services or products are the right choice.

4. Call-to-action: The last slide of your PowerPoint presentation should motivate your audience to act . You’ve presented your company in detail and with conviction – now you want a reaction from the audience. You can formulate this call to action in more general phrases along the lines of “Let’s get it done!” or “Let’s go!”, package it as a targeted question about the content or use it as a prompt for follow-up contact.

Company Presentation

Tip 4: Highlight benefits to your target audience

Knowledge about your target group is power . The first question your audience will ask themselves when you give a presentation is, “How will I benefit from this?” Here are some questions that will help you tailor your content to your audience :

  • What are the driving factors for purchasing/collaborating?
  • How much prior knowledge about your company is available?
  • What follow-up questions are you likely to receive?
  • What key messages do you want to convey in your presentation?
  • What is your unique selling point (USP) and how do you differ from your competitors? Check out this blog article for more information.
  • What kind of design and layout is right for your (business) presentation?
  • Storytelling: How do you best get your story across?
  • Is the company history really interesting to your audience? Maybe it’s the new innovative solutions you’re about to launch that will deliver real added value?
  • Does it matter how many locations and employees you have or is how your customer service process works more important?

A good start to developing your presentation is a team brainstorming session followed by a workshop with key decision-makers from management, marketing, and sales. You can also bring editors, copywriters or a specialized agency on board.

Tip 5: Convince with more than just text

The presentation design needs to be just as convincing as the content. Most presentations we see consist of 70-80% text. But bullet points and sprawling text alone aren’t enough to make an impact .

The design process begins when you stop focusing on writing statements and start creating a presentation that supports your content visually. Here’s a good rule of thumb: 50% of your slide’s area should be text, 50% should be images, graphs and charts .

Obviously, you don’t have to follow this rigidly on all slides, but presentations with rich visual content are always a success . The most important thing is to keep written content short – keywords and short sentences are usually enough .

The following slides (screenshots from our Company Presentation Toolbo x ) provide vivid examples of layouts and designs.

Company Presentation Toolbox

If you’re pressed for time or need some professional design inspiration, check out our PowerPoint templates . Or ask a graphic designer or a professional PowerPoint or presentation agency like PresentationLoad for support.

Tip 6: The customer is king: Give them what they want

Before you start your presentation, ask your audience what information they need. Are they familiar with your company? Have they already gone to your website for information? Knowing this might help you tailor it more to your audience’s needs by editing or even completely omitting sections of your presentation. The key is to remain flexible while presenting and only include what is really relevant to your audience.

The first step is to make sure your presentation is completely up to date .  A slide master is the easiest way to make any universal changes to your presentation, update key figures, contact information, etc., without sacrificing formatting or layout.

Even in a completely updated presentation, you may find there’s information that just isn’t relevant to your target audience. PowerPoint helps you with this by providing a quick and easy option to hide slides . In the thumbnail pane, right-click the slide you want to hide and select Hide Slide .  You can also hide multiple slides by holding down the Ctrl key , clicking on them and then selecting Hide Slide with a right-click. The hidden slides will now appear greyed out. To reverse this option, simply click Hide Slide again and you slides will be visible.

Another technique to make your PowerPoint company presentation more flexible and interactive is to use hyperlinks . For example, you could hyperlink all the titles of individual sections on your agenda slide so that you can jump from the agenda slide directly to the relevant section with a simple click. This also allows you to respond dynamically to your audience’s reactions or interests.

Pro tip : Use your company logo as a home button. Adding a small logo to the corner of each slide not only strengthens your branding, but also allows you to add a hyperlink to the agenda slide. Click on the logo and you’re back to your PowerPoint presentation overview.

Tip 7: Present like a pro

A company presentation lives and dies by its delivery . Even a perfect presentation is of little value if the delivery isn’t convincing. As a presenter, you need to communicate the passion and enthusiasm you feel for your brand through your presentation.

But don’t go overboard! Be authentic . If you can do this, your company presentation will not only reinforce your company’s positive image but will also excite your audience.

Arouse emotions by using images that speak to your audience . Involve your audience by starting with words such as “Imagine…”. Focus less on “we” (your company) and more on “you” (your audience) . These techniques will help you open the door to your audience’s subconscious – which is where most decisions are made.

 ✔ Leave enough time to rehearse your presentation . Ask your colleagues if they would be willing to serve as a test audience and give feedback on your presentation.

Company Preseentation

Tip 8: Post-presentation best practice

Always prepare a ready-to-email format of your presentation . When your customers and partners are impressed, they’ more likely to ask for a digital copy.

Never send your presentation as a PowerPoint file; always send it as a PDF to preserve its formatting and layout. Be sure to pay attention to the file size , too. A company presentation in PDF format should be no larger than about 3MB. An email attachment containing a 30MB company presentation will come across as anything but professional. There’s also a risk that the email won’t even reach the recipient’s inbox due to a limited attachment size.

✔ Create your company presentation PDF before you present . This way, you can offer it as a digital copy directly after the presentation.

Win customers with your company presentation

On just a few slides, your company presentation summarizes all the pertinent facts and ideas with which you want to convince your audience. This makes it all the more important to truly understand your audience before you start designing your presentation .

The first impression counts – adhering to your corporate design will elevate your presentation to a higher, more professional level. Be concise and to the point and highlight the benefits your audience will derive from working with you and your company. A modern presentation is designed with a 50:50 ratio of text to images ; avoid too much text and unnecessary facts.

As the presenter, you represent your company. That’s why it’s especially important to be flexible and provide your audience with the information that matters most to them .

The aim of this blog post is to provide you with a general idea of how to create a practical and convincing company presentation in PowerPoint. These tips are based on years of proven professional expertise.

Need help creating an even better company presentation?

Feel free to post a comment here or contact me directly by sending an email to [email protected] .

I’d be happy to answer your questions or, along with my team, help you with the concept, structure, content and design of your company presentations. It can really help to have someone with a different perspective take a look at your presentations.

We have been creating PowerPoint presentations for mid-sized companies and international corporations for almost 20 years. As a result, we have a wealth of experience with corporate sales and strategy presentations.

Additional services:

  • Non-binding consultation for your presentations.
  • Send me your presentations for review.
  • Professional support with concept and design.
  • Revision of your existing company presentations.

Good luck with your presentations!

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How to Make a Business Presentation (12 Easy Tips)

Jul 25, 2022

Whether over online or in the conference room, there’s a lot to consider when making a business presentation. Finding your unique presentation style that balances humor, confidence, approachability, and professionalism is no easy feat. Above all, capturing and retaining your audience’s attention is the most important and often the most difficult thing to juggle.

In this blog, we’ll share how to make a business presentation that’s compelling, engaging, persuasive, and memorable. Feel free to skip ahead to our 12 tips or start creating your own business presentation with a professional template

2022-06 SEO-Blog-Post-Images Q2-Batch1 How-to-make-a-Business Presentation

How to Prepare an Impactful Business Presentation in 8 Steps

/ Steven Hobson / Business English , Confidence , English Presentations , Speaking

business presentation english

For non-native speakers, giving a business presentation in English can be a scary experience, especially if you don’t do it often or feel insecure about speaking English in front of others.

Over the years, I have helped a range of professionals prepare for business presentations, as well as training teachers to prepare their students for presentations when I ran my own language school in Brazil.  

During this time I constructed a very effective approach that can be used if you are preparing for a business presentation but do not have a coach or trainer t o guide you.

In this post, I’m going to share with you this proven approach which consists of 8 steps.

Step 1: The Foundation to Your Business Presentation – Goal, Audience, Past Experience

This first step is essential for a successful business presentation, as it sets the foundation for the rest of your preparation.

Ask yourself what exactly it is that you want to achieve with this presentation. In other words, what is the goal?  What do you want to communicate and how do you want the audience to react or take action?

In addition to this, consider your audience. How many people will you be presenting to? Do you know the audience personally or are they unknown to you? What will they be expecting? Are there any cultural differences you need to be aware of?  For what reasons are they listening to your business presentation?

lastly, if you have given business presentations in English before, reflect on your experience. What were your main challenges and how will you face them this time around? What improvements do you need to make?

I prepared an executive who once told me that he froze up when he was stopped to ask questions during his presentations. He was worried about whether he was going to understand the questions correctly, as well as being capable of giving a good answer under pressure.

For this, we worked on how to ask for clarification if he wanted to make sure he understood the questions, and then we wrote down all the possible questions he could get asked and rehearsed the answers.

This reflection and extra preparation helped the executive to overcome his nerves and anxiety for his next business presentation.

Mini-course: fluency and confidence

Step 2: Prepare the Slides with Minimum Text

One of the biggest mistakes I see people making when putting their slides together is including too much text. Or even worse, their speech is the text which is written on the slides.

If there is too much text, three damaging things can happen.

First, the presenter spends more time reading the slides and doesn’t look at the audience enough. This makes it difficult to establish a connection with your audience.

Secondly, good eye contact can communicate confidence and authority , which helps the audience to agree with or believe your message. Therefore, spending too much time looking at the slides can affect how confident or authoritative you look, which will consequently weaken your message.

Thirdly, it confuses your audience because they don’t know whether to read the slides or listen to you. Both, they cannot do. And potentially they could miss important parts, let alone diminish engagement.

So ask yourself these questions when preparing your slides: Is there too much text?  Could the slides be better summarized? Could there be more images?

The slides should really be as condensed as possible using keywords , as well as being visual.

Step 3: Record Yourself from Beginning to End

Before writing down your speech or doing any rehearsals, record yourself (audio or video) giving the business presentation from beginning to end.

Your presentation will be unpolished and rough, however, this exercise will give you some immediate and useful insights on how you present and what you need to improve.

When playing back the recording try to look out for the following:

  • the parts of the presentation you are finding difficult to explain,
  • if you are being objective enough or taking too long to explain something,
  • how often you use filler word s, such as “erm”, “um”,
  • whether you are using a variety of linking phrases between parts,
  • if there are any grammar mistakes you can recognise.

These insights will help when you start working on your speech, which is the next step.

Furthermore, you can compare this initial recording with future recordings. This will help you perceive your progress, which will build confidence.

Step 4: The Introduction

Next, you’re going to focus on the separate parts of the business presentation, beginning with the introduction.

The introduction normally includes a few sentences to welcome the audience, say a little bit about who you are, communicate the objective of the business presentation, and then give an outline of the main parts of the presentation.

I recommend writing down the script and memorizing the introduction word for word, as it is only going to be a few sentences. You can write it in the ‘notes’ section at the bottom of the PowerPoint slides.

Memorizing the introduction will strengthen the delivery of it, and a strong intro will not only calm down your nerves , it will also give the audience a great first impression of you which helps to build trus t .

Practice out loud a few times then move on to the middle section.

Click here for introduction phrases for a business presentation.

How to Become a Confident English Speaker

Step 5: The Middle

Just like the introduction, write down the script for the middle part. However this time, the reason for writing the middle section is to make your speech more objective and straight to the point, rather than memorizing it word for word.

I suggest working through your business presentation part by part. Write the script for a specific section, practice saying it aloud a few times, then move on to the next part.

An important part of the middle section is how you link all the different parts and slides together. Make sure you use a variety of linking phrases to join everything up and maximize presentation flow.

Here’s an example of a linking phrase: “Ok, I’ve explained how ABC works. Now I’d like to change direction and talk about XYZ.”

Linking phrases help you move through the business presentation smoothly and the audience will be able to follow it easier.

Once you have written your speech, a useful exercise is to run through the presentation only saying the linking phrases. This will help you identify if you are using enough variety and it will cement the structure of the presentation in your mind.

Click here for more linking phrases for the middle section of a business presentation.

Step 6: The End

For the ending, use the same method as the introduction and middle section – writing the speech and then practicing it orally.

Just like the intro, the ending is normally quite short and consists of a summary or conclusion, followed by questions, then thanking the audience.

Click here for expressions to help you with the ending of a business presentation.

Step 7: Practice and Repeat from Top to Bottom

Practice and repetition is the most important aspect of preparing for a business presentation.

By now, you have edited your slides, written your speech, and practiced each section individually a few times. You have also chosen a variety of linking phrases to improve the flow of the presentation.

At this point, you need to practice the presentation aloud as many times as you can from beginning to end. I suggest that you record yourself every now and again, listen to the playback and note down where you think you can improve.

Go back to that very first recording and compare yourself now. Your progress will be visible and this will increase confidence. As you continue to practice, you’ll find that your fluency level will improve.

If possible, practice in front of work colleagues and ask them to give you feedback. This will give you experience presenting in front of people, and there’s always something which we miss while other people notice.

Alternatively, look for a coach or trainer to help you. I offer this service online. Apply for a free evaluation here.

Step 8: Anticipate Audience Questions 

When you are feeling comfortable giving the presentation, the next step is to anticipate questions that your audience might ask. Write down how you would like to answer these questions and practice them orally.

You will either invite the audience to ask questions after you have finished the business presentation or in some cases, the audience will interrupt you during the presentation.

It is more challenging when you get interrupted because it breaks the flow. An effective way to prepare for this is to get somebody to ask you anticipated questions during specific slides as you are practicing the presentation. This will help you get used to being interrupted, answering the question, then resuming the presentation again.

Conclusion

By following this 8 step approach, you will find that your confidence and fluency will improve significantly at giving business presentations.

The crucial part is the practice. You can never practice too much.

Be disciplined enough to define a practice routine and follow through with it. When you feel comfortable, practice a few more times. You’ll see that it is worth the effort after receiving praise for delivering a successful business presentation.

How to Become a Confident English Speaker at Work

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Author: Steven Hobson

Steven is a business English coach, a certified life coach, writer, and entrepreneur. He helps international professionals build confidence and improve fluency speaking English in a business environment.

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10 Corporate Deck Examples & Templates (That Stand Out)

Get tips for creating an impressive corporate pitch deck, see high-performing corporate slide deck examples , and grab a battle-tested corporate deck template .

company presentation guidelines

Dominika Krukowska

8 minute read

Corporate pitch deck examples

Short answer

What does a corporate deck include.

A typical corporate deck includes the following elements:

  • Introduction (UVP + hook)
  • Problem (your market segment has)
  • Solution (you have that no one can copy)
  • Market size and opportunity
  • Business and revenue model
  • Traction and validation
  • Marketing/growth strategy
  • Team (authority & experience)
  • Investment and use of funds

Without an outstanding deck, you won't get funded.

The highly competitive business landscape makes it challenging to impress investors with your pitch. Countless hours spent crafting the perfect pitch may not be enough.

If you don't have a well-crafted corporate deck, you risk losing investors and missing out on the funding your business needs to succeed.

Read on to learn the key components of a winning corporate deck and get insights from templated corporate deck examples that have successfully secured funding for other companies. Let’s go!

What is a corporate deck?

A corporate deck, or corporate pitch deck, is a presentation designed to convey the essential aspects of a business to potential investors, partners, or stakeholders. A corporate deck includes slides that outline the company's business model, products or services, target market, competition, team, financials, and growth strategy.

What is the goal of a corporate deck?

The goal of a corporate deck is to secure their investment, partnership, or stakeholder buy-in. To achieve this objective, corporate pitch decks should be heavily focused on showing the impact of the product, service or initiative on market-share, growth, and revenue.

If you're looking for other types of business presentations, check out our dedicated guides:

  • Make a Sales Pitch Deck That Turns ‘Maybe’ to ‘Yes!’
  • Create a Sales One-Pager (Examples, Writing Tips, Templates)
  • Make a Winning Business Proposal Presentation in 12 Steps
  • How to Create a Marketing Deck (Strategy, Tips & Templates)

Why most corporate decks fail (and how to avoid it)

The hard truth is that 99% of corporate decks fail to impress investors. That's a staggering statistic, but it's not surprising given the common pitfalls that many companies fall into when creating their presentations.

Here are the reasons why corporate decks fail and how to avoid these mistakes:

1. They use static slides that kill engagement

Static slides are engagement killers - there’s no option to visualize your data, include an actionable CTA, or deliver a pleasant reader experience on a mobile device.

Reengage your audience by incorporating interactive elements into your deck. Things such as videos, animations, clickable charts, or interactive ROI calculators.

Interactive content allows investors to explore the data on their own at their preferred pace. And when you allow investors to interact with your presentation, you’re increasing the chances of them reading it in full by 41% .

company presentation guidelines

2. They offer facts rather than tell a story

Corporate slide decks that rely too heavily on listing out facts and figures are dry and tiring.

Instead of spouting facts, structure your deck around a compelling narrative that captures investors' attention and makes them care about your mission and vision.

If you’re not sure how to get started, here’s a video on how to improve storytelling in a pitch deck:

How to improve storytelling in a pitch deck

3. They are generic and fail to personalize

Investors are swamped with corporate decks on a daily basis, and they can smell generic from a mile away.

If you truly want to stand out from the crowd, you need to do your research ahead of time to understand the specific needs of your target audience.

By understanding what matters most to them, you can create a presentation that speaks directly to their concerns and demonstrates how your company can deliver value. Personalization gets 68% more people to read your deck in full .

4. They fail to use behavior data to continually optimize

Make sure you’re making data-driven decks instead of flying blind. If you’re sending out PDFs or PowerPoints that collect zero data about how readers engage with your deck there’s no way you’ll ever achieve a top performing deck.

The good news is that Storydoc decks collect insight on how your audience interacts with your deck, down to the slide and even button level. Where they skip, where they linger and when they share it with other decision-makers. Imagine what you could do with this info!

Deck analyti

Corporate deck examples that stand out

A beautiful corporate presentation deck is a basic requirement - it’s not gonna make you stand out.

To create a deck that drives real results you’ll wanna take a close look at our list of the top corporate deck examples.

These corporate deck samples were all created using Storydoc and have been optimized for high engagement.

And the best part? All the examples are templated, which means you can use any of them to create your best-performing corporate deck in minutes!

Jump ahead to each example:

Startup pitch deck

What makes this deck great:

  • The cover slide video enhances interaction, increasing engagement by up to 32% . This boosts the chances of potential investors reading the deck in its entirety and taking the desired action at the end.
  • The roadmap slide offers a clear and concise presentation of your start-up’s journey. Meanwhile, various data visualization elements are perfect for demonstrating financial projections, proving that your business is making progress.
  • The calendar integration on the final slide simplifies the process for investors to schedule the next meeting immediately after going through your corporate deck.

Light mode invest pitch deck

  • The minimalist design makes your deck easy to follow even for those unfamiliar with the industry.
  • With image and video placeholders , showcasing your solution and how it solves problems is effortless, without relying on complicated terminology.
  • The interactive slides showcase the team behind your solution, illustrating their capability to steer it towards success.

Light mode product pitch deck

  • The powerful personalization features enable you to produce an infinite number of versions of your deck in just a few clicks, resulting in 68% more people reading it entirely .
  • The AI assistant lets you create relevant visuals or copy for the corporate pitch deck in just a few clicks.
  • The intuitive editor automatically extracts the essential visuals of your company, ensuring that your deck maintains its brand consistency.

Investor pitch deck

  • The fresh, contemporary design is sure to capture the attention of potential investors, particularly in trend-led industries.
  • The perfect balance of text-based slides and engaging visuals enables you to present your key metrics while providing necessary context.
  • The scroll-based interactive design facilitates explaining your solution to potential investors and guides them through a compelling narrative.

Pitch deck essentials

  • The compact design makes it easy to communicate essential information in fewer slides, saving the investors' time.
  • Various interactive slides provide potential investors with all the critical insights at first glance. By clicking through tabs, they can discover more about your solution, enhancing their engagement.
  • The smart CTAs allow you to incorporate a live chat widget or calendar, smoothly directing potential investors to the next step.

Product pitch deck

  • The combination of visual slides is ideal for presenting the product's primary features and use cases without overloading investors with walls of text.
  • Videos that can be embedded and played directly from the deck allow you to include case studies from past customers to legitimize your product.
  • An easy, intuitive editor ensures complete control over your presentation. If you release a new product version or make a typo in the specs, you can quickly make the necessary tweaks at any time, even after sending your deck.
  • Powerful interactive design that doesn't detract from the main message. By using our running numbers slides and data visualization elements, you can present key metrics or financial projections to potential investors in an eye-catching, easy-to-understand format.
  • Several data visualization elements that can be customized to your specific use case. You can also add real-time variables to your charts.
  • The dynamic content allows your audience to interact with the deck. For example, you can embed an interactive ROI calculator that they can fill out to determine if they're getting their money's worth.

General invest pitch deck

  • The versatile components make it suitable for pre-seed, seed, or series A funding. It includes all the necessary corporate deck elements that you can use to create a master deck.
  • The ability to add customizable fields that can be filled in within seconds, making it possible to personalize your corporate deck at scale.
  • The intuitive, user-friendly editor ensures that anything you add automatically adjusts to the overall deck layout. This means you don't have to worry about breaking the design.

Creative pitch deck

  • The attention-grabbing design , featuring vibrant colors and animated elements, can convert casual scrollers into engaged readers.
  • The fully interactive layout of this corporate deck increases interaction and extends the average reading time.
  • The combination of visual and data visualization slides enables you to showcase snippets of your portfolio while emphasizing the most crucial metrics.

Bonus: successful corporate deck example by a Storydoc client

Finally, we left the best for last - a real-life corporate deck example created for one of our clients operating in the medical cannabis industry. It has been designed according to the best practices for creating a powerful corporate deck and delivered outstanding results.

  • The running numbers slides enable readers to quickly and easily access the most critical metrics.
  • The roadmap slide provides a clear and concise visualization of the company's current growth and significant milestones.
  • The narrator slide simplifies complex financial metrics by directing the reader's attention to the exact numbers they should be focusing on at any given time.

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How to measure the effectiveness of a corporate deck.

To create a highly performing deck in the top 1%, it’s critical to measure performance, identify problems, and fix them.

Key corporate deck performance metrics to measure and optimize:

  • Open rate: Measure the percentage of investors who open your corporate deck to understand how effective your deck is at generating initial interest.
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  • Engagement: Track how long viewers stay on each slide, how often they interact with the deck, or where they drop off to determine which parts of your corporate deck are most captivating and identify areas for improvement.
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What is the best tool for making a corporate deck?

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company presentation guidelines

Hi, I'm Dominika, Content Specialist at Storydoc. As a creative professional with experience in fashion, I'm here to show you how to amplify your brand message through the power of storytelling and eye-catching visuals.

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  • PLoS Comput Biol
  • v.17(12); 2021 Dec

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Ten simple rules for effective presentation slides

Kristen m. naegle.

Biomedical Engineering and the Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America

Introduction

The “presentation slide” is the building block of all academic presentations, whether they are journal clubs, thesis committee meetings, short conference talks, or hour-long seminars. A slide is a single page projected on a screen, usually built on the premise of a title, body, and figures or tables and includes both what is shown and what is spoken about that slide. Multiple slides are strung together to tell the larger story of the presentation. While there have been excellent 10 simple rules on giving entire presentations [ 1 , 2 ], there was an absence in the fine details of how to design a slide for optimal effect—such as the design elements that allow slides to convey meaningful information, to keep the audience engaged and informed, and to deliver the information intended and in the time frame allowed. As all research presentations seek to teach, effective slide design borrows from the same principles as effective teaching, including the consideration of cognitive processing your audience is relying on to organize, process, and retain information. This is written for anyone who needs to prepare slides from any length scale and for most purposes of conveying research to broad audiences. The rules are broken into 3 primary areas. Rules 1 to 5 are about optimizing the scope of each slide. Rules 6 to 8 are about principles around designing elements of the slide. Rules 9 to 10 are about preparing for your presentation, with the slides as the central focus of that preparation.

Rule 1: Include only one idea per slide

Each slide should have one central objective to deliver—the main idea or question [ 3 – 5 ]. Often, this means breaking complex ideas down into manageable pieces (see Fig 1 , where “background” information has been split into 2 key concepts). In another example, if you are presenting a complex computational approach in a large flow diagram, introduce it in smaller units, building it up until you finish with the entire diagram. The progressive buildup of complex information means that audiences are prepared to understand the whole picture, once you have dedicated time to each of the parts. You can accomplish the buildup of components in several ways—for example, using presentation software to cover/uncover information. Personally, I choose to create separate slides for each piece of information content I introduce—where the final slide has the entire diagram, and I use cropping or a cover on duplicated slides that come before to hide what I’m not yet ready to include. I use this method in order to ensure that each slide in my deck truly presents one specific idea (the new content) and the amount of the new information on that slide can be described in 1 minute (Rule 2), but it comes with the trade-off—a change to the format of one of the slides in the series often means changes to all slides.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is pcbi.1009554.g001.jpg

Top left: A background slide that describes the background material on a project from my lab. The slide was created using a PowerPoint Design Template, which had to be modified to increase default text sizes for this figure (i.e., the default text sizes are even worse than shown here). Bottom row: The 2 new slides that break up the content into 2 explicit ideas about the background, using a central graphic. In the first slide, the graphic is an explicit example of the SH2 domain of PI3-kinase interacting with a phosphorylation site (Y754) on the PDGFR to describe the important details of what an SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine ligand are and how they interact. I use that same graphic in the second slide to generalize all binding events and include redundant text to drive home the central message (a lot of possible interactions might occur in the human proteome, more than we can currently measure). Top right highlights which rules were used to move from the original slide to the new slide. Specific changes as highlighted by Rule 7 include increasing contrast by changing the background color, increasing font size, changing to sans serif fonts, and removing all capital text and underlining (using bold to draw attention). PDGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor.

Rule 2: Spend only 1 minute per slide

When you present your slide in the talk, it should take 1 minute or less to discuss. This rule is really helpful for planning purposes—a 20-minute presentation should have somewhere around 20 slides. Also, frequently giving your audience new information to feast on helps keep them engaged. During practice, if you find yourself spending more than a minute on a slide, there’s too much for that one slide—it’s time to break up the content into multiple slides or even remove information that is not wholly central to the story you are trying to tell. Reduce, reduce, reduce, until you get to a single message, clearly described, which takes less than 1 minute to present.

Rule 3: Make use of your heading

When each slide conveys only one message, use the heading of that slide to write exactly the message you are trying to deliver. Instead of titling the slide “Results,” try “CTNND1 is central to metastasis” or “False-positive rates are highly sample specific.” Use this landmark signpost to ensure that all the content on that slide is related exactly to the heading and only the heading. Think of the slide heading as the introductory or concluding sentence of a paragraph and the slide content the rest of the paragraph that supports the main point of the paragraph. An audience member should be able to follow along with you in the “paragraph” and come to the same conclusion sentence as your header at the end of the slide.

Rule 4: Include only essential points

While you are speaking, audience members’ eyes and minds will be wandering over your slide. If you have a comment, detail, or figure on a slide, have a plan to explicitly identify and talk about it. If you don’t think it’s important enough to spend time on, then don’t have it on your slide. This is especially important when faculty are present. I often tell students that thesis committee members are like cats: If you put a shiny bauble in front of them, they’ll go after it. Be sure to only put the shiny baubles on slides that you want them to focus on. Putting together a thesis meeting for only faculty is really an exercise in herding cats (if you have cats, you know this is no easy feat). Clear and concise slide design will go a long way in helping you corral those easily distracted faculty members.

Rule 5: Give credit, where credit is due

An exception to Rule 4 is to include proper citations or references to work on your slide. When adding citations, names of other researchers, or other types of credit, use a consistent style and method for adding this information to your slides. Your audience will then be able to easily partition this information from the other content. A common mistake people make is to think “I’ll add that reference later,” but I highly recommend you put the proper reference on the slide at the time you make it, before you forget where it came from. Finally, in certain kinds of presentations, credits can make it clear who did the work. For the faculty members heading labs, it is an effective way to connect your audience with the personnel in the lab who did the work, which is a great career booster for that person. For graduate students, it is an effective way to delineate your contribution to the work, especially in meetings where the goal is to establish your credentials for meeting the rigors of a PhD checkpoint.

Rule 6: Use graphics effectively

As a rule, you should almost never have slides that only contain text. Build your slides around good visualizations. It is a visual presentation after all, and as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. However, on the flip side, don’t muddy the point of the slide by putting too many complex graphics on a single slide. A multipanel figure that you might include in a manuscript should often be broken into 1 panel per slide (see Rule 1 ). One way to ensure that you use the graphics effectively is to make a point to introduce the figure and its elements to the audience verbally, especially for data figures. For example, you might say the following: “This graph here shows the measured false-positive rate for an experiment and each point is a replicate of the experiment, the graph demonstrates …” If you have put too much on one slide to present in 1 minute (see Rule 2 ), then the complexity or number of the visualizations is too much for just one slide.

Rule 7: Design to avoid cognitive overload

The type of slide elements, the number of them, and how you present them all impact the ability for the audience to intake, organize, and remember the content. For example, a frequent mistake in slide design is to include full sentences, but reading and verbal processing use the same cognitive channels—therefore, an audience member can either read the slide, listen to you, or do some part of both (each poorly), as a result of cognitive overload [ 4 ]. The visual channel is separate, allowing images/videos to be processed with auditory information without cognitive overload [ 6 ] (Rule 6). As presentations are an exercise in listening, and not reading, do what you can to optimize the ability of the audience to listen. Use words sparingly as “guide posts” to you and the audience about major points of the slide. In fact, you can add short text fragments, redundant with the verbal component of the presentation, which has been shown to improve retention [ 7 ] (see Fig 1 for an example of redundant text that avoids cognitive overload). Be careful in the selection of a slide template to minimize accidentally adding elements that the audience must process, but are unimportant. David JP Phillips argues (and effectively demonstrates in his TEDx talk [ 5 ]) that the human brain can easily interpret 6 elements and more than that requires a 500% increase in human cognition load—so keep the total number of elements on the slide to 6 or less. Finally, in addition to the use of short text, white space, and the effective use of graphics/images, you can improve ease of cognitive processing further by considering color choices and font type and size. Here are a few suggestions for improving the experience for your audience, highlighting the importance of these elements for some specific groups:

  • Use high contrast colors and simple backgrounds with low to no color—for persons with dyslexia or visual impairment.
  • Use sans serif fonts and large font sizes (including figure legends), avoid italics, underlining (use bold font instead for emphasis), and all capital letters—for persons with dyslexia or visual impairment [ 8 ].
  • Use color combinations and palettes that can be understood by those with different forms of color blindness [ 9 ]. There are excellent tools available to identify colors to use and ways to simulate your presentation or figures as they might be seen by a person with color blindness (easily found by a web search).
  • In this increasing world of virtual presentation tools, consider practicing your talk with a closed captioning system capture your words. Use this to identify how to improve your speaking pace, volume, and annunciation to improve understanding by all members of your audience, but especially those with a hearing impairment.

Rule 8: Design the slide so that a distracted person gets the main takeaway

It is very difficult to stay focused on a presentation, especially if it is long or if it is part of a longer series of talks at a conference. Audience members may get distracted by an important email, or they may start dreaming of lunch. So, it’s important to look at your slide and ask “If they heard nothing I said, will they understand the key concept of this slide?” The other rules are set up to help with this, including clarity of the single point of the slide (Rule 1), titling it with a major conclusion (Rule 3), and the use of figures (Rule 6) and short text redundant to your verbal description (Rule 7). However, with each slide, step back and ask whether its main conclusion is conveyed, even if someone didn’t hear your accompanying dialog. Importantly, ask if the information on the slide is at the right level of abstraction. For example, do you have too many details about the experiment, which hides the conclusion of the experiment (i.e., breaking Rule 1)? If you are worried about not having enough details, keep a slide at the end of your slide deck (after your conclusions and acknowledgments) with the more detailed information that you can refer to during a question and answer period.

Rule 9: Iteratively improve slide design through practice

Well-designed slides that follow the first 8 rules are intended to help you deliver the message you intend and in the amount of time you intend to deliver it in. The best way to ensure that you nailed slide design for your presentation is to practice, typically a lot. The most important aspects of practicing a new presentation, with an eye toward slide design, are the following 2 key points: (1) practice to ensure that you hit, each time through, the most important points (for example, the text guide posts you left yourself and the title of the slide); and (2) practice to ensure that as you conclude the end of one slide, it leads directly to the next slide. Slide transitions, what you say as you end one slide and begin the next, are important to keeping the flow of the “story.” Practice is when I discover that the order of my presentation is poor or that I left myself too few guideposts to remember what was coming next. Additionally, during practice, the most frequent things I have to improve relate to Rule 2 (the slide takes too long to present, usually because I broke Rule 1, and I’m delivering too much information for one slide), Rule 4 (I have a nonessential detail on the slide), and Rule 5 (I forgot to give a key reference). The very best type of practice is in front of an audience (for example, your lab or peers), where, with fresh perspectives, they can help you identify places for improving slide content, design, and connections across the entirety of your talk.

Rule 10: Design to mitigate the impact of technical disasters

The real presentation almost never goes as we planned in our heads or during our practice. Maybe the speaker before you went over time and now you need to adjust. Maybe the computer the organizer is having you use won’t show your video. Maybe your internet is poor on the day you are giving a virtual presentation at a conference. Technical problems are routinely part of the practice of sharing your work through presentations. Hence, you can design your slides to limit the impact certain kinds of technical disasters create and also prepare alternate approaches. Here are just a few examples of the preparation you can do that will take you a long way toward avoiding a complete fiasco:

  • Save your presentation as a PDF—if the version of Keynote or PowerPoint on a host computer cause issues, you still have a functional copy that has a higher guarantee of compatibility.
  • In using videos, create a backup slide with screen shots of key results. For example, if I have a video of cell migration, I’ll be sure to have a copy of the start and end of the video, in case the video doesn’t play. Even if the video worked, you can pause on this backup slide and take the time to highlight the key results in words if someone could not see or understand the video.
  • Avoid animations, such as figures or text that flash/fly-in/etc. Surveys suggest that no one likes movement in presentations [ 3 , 4 ]. There is likely a cognitive underpinning to the almost universal distaste of pointless animations that relates to the idea proposed by Kosslyn and colleagues that animations are salient perceptual units that captures direct attention [ 4 ]. Although perceptual salience can be used to draw attention to and improve retention of specific points, if you use this approach for unnecessary/unimportant things (like animation of your bullet point text, fly-ins of figures, etc.), then you will distract your audience from the important content. Finally, animations cause additional processing burdens for people with visual impairments [ 10 ] and create opportunities for technical disasters if the software on the host system is not compatible with your planned animation.

Conclusions

These rules are just a start in creating more engaging presentations that increase audience retention of your material. However, there are wonderful resources on continuing on the journey of becoming an amazing public speaker, which includes understanding the psychology and neuroscience behind human perception and learning. For example, as highlighted in Rule 7, David JP Phillips has a wonderful TEDx talk on the subject [ 5 ], and “PowerPoint presentation flaws and failures: A psychological analysis,” by Kosslyn and colleagues is deeply detailed about a number of aspects of human cognition and presentation style [ 4 ]. There are many books on the topic, including the popular “Presentation Zen” by Garr Reynolds [ 11 ]. Finally, although briefly touched on here, the visualization of data is an entire topic of its own that is worth perfecting for both written and oral presentations of work, with fantastic resources like Edward Tufte’s “The Visual Display of Quantitative Information” [ 12 ] or the article “Visualization of Biomedical Data” by O’Donoghue and colleagues [ 13 ].

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the countless presenters, colleagues, students, and mentors from which I have learned a great deal from on effective presentations. Also, a thank you to the wonderful resources published by organizations on how to increase inclusivity. A special thanks to Dr. Jason Papin and Dr. Michael Guertin on early feedback of this editorial.

Funding Statement

The author received no specific funding for this work.

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Deck Builders & Contractors in Ul'yanovsk

Location (1).

  • Use My Current Location

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  • Ul'yanovsk, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia

What services do deck and patio companies in Ul'yanovsk, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia provide?

Questions to ask a prospective ul'yanovsk, ulyanovsk oblast, russia deck installers and patio builder:, business services, connect with us.

company presentation guidelines

Industrial Group MIDA (Microelectronic Sensors)

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Russia Near Ul’yanovsk

  • Automobiles & Motorcycles
  •    Vehicle Tools
  •      Tire Gauges
  •    Petroleum Additives
  • Electrical Equipment & Supplies
  •    Switches
  •      Pressure Switches
  • Health & Medical
  •    Monitoring & Diagnostic Equipment
  •      Blood Pressure Monitor

Company Description

Related companies   more, popular searches in russia.

  • Construction
  • Engineering
  • International
  • Iso 9001 Certified Companies
  • Manufacturing
  • Multinationals
  • Pharmaceutical

Related industries in Ul’yanovsk, Russia

  • Food & Beverage
  • Home & Garden
  • Business Services
  • Agriculture
  • Minerals & Metallurgy
  • Construction & Real Estate
  • General Industrial Equipment
  • Manufacturing & Processing...
  • Furniture & Furnishings
  •    Vehicle Equipment
  • Rubber & Plastics
  • Personal Care
  • Packaging & Paper
  •    Agency Services
  •    Auto Engine
  •    Batteries
  •    Cookware
  •    Industrial Fuel
  •    Coke Fuel
  •      Fuel Cells
  •      Fuel Systems
  •    Processing Services
  •    Chemical Equipment
  • Consumer Electronics
  •      Pressure Vessels
  • Lights & Lighting
  • Textiles & Leather Products
  • Electronic Components & Supplies
  •    Plastic Raw Materials
  • Transportation
  •      Tire Changers
  •      Pressure Cookers
  •    Grain Products
  •    Hairdressing Supplies

IMAGES

  1. Free Brand Guidelines Templates

    company presentation guidelines

  2. Brand Identity Guidelines PowerPoint Presentation Template

    company presentation guidelines

  3. 11 Guidelines for Creating Your Best Presentation

    company presentation guidelines

  4. Presentation slide template for your company with infographic elements

    company presentation guidelines

  5. Free Brand Guidelines Templates

    company presentation guidelines

  6. Brand Identity Guidelines PowerPoint Presentation Template

    company presentation guidelines

COMMENTS

  1. The Complete Guide to Making Great Business Presentations in 2021

    To do this, open the Google Slides business presentation with the slide design you want. Click the desired slide and click Control-C to copy the slide to your clipboard. Open a second business presentation that you want to copy the slide to. Click the slide before where you want to insert the copied slide.

  2. What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

    Read more on Business communication or related topics Power and influence, Presentation skills and Public speaking Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of ...

  3. How to Make an Effective Presentation (Guide, Tips & Examples)

    To make your text stand out, you need to use contrasting colors. For example, you can make the background black and your text a bright shade of green to make it stand out, or vice versa. Just be sure that your text is easily readable for your audience. 22. Proofread and polish your presentation.

  4. PowerPoint Guidelines to Design Effective Presentations + Video

    1. Galaxi PowerPoint Presentation Template. The Galaxi PowerPoint template has a clean and modern design. It's versatile enough to use for all kinds of presentations and comes with five premade color schemes. The template comes with 30 premade slides based on master slides, image placeholders, and editable shapes. 2.

  5. How To Make a Good Presentation [A Complete Guide]

    Apply the 10-20-30 rule. Apply the 10-20-30 presentation rule and keep it short, sweet and impactful! Stick to ten slides, deliver your presentation within 20 minutes and use a 30-point font to ensure clarity and focus. Less is more, and your audience will thank you for it! 9. Implement the 5-5-5 rule. Simplicity is key.

  6. How To Give a Business Presentation (With Steps and Tips)

    Follow these steps to create a great business presentation: 1. Know your audience. The first step to creating any type of presentation is to know your audience. Understanding who will be learning from your presentation is critical to creating a presentation that will have relevant information, stories and visuals.

  7. 15 Expert Tips for Giving a Powerful Business Presentation

    2 Be enthusiastic. Believe me, vibes matter. No one wants to hear you drone on about a subject you don't care for. If you're tired and bored of your own presentation, your audience is probably feeling the same way. Anyone listening to you should know how passionate you are about the subject.

  8. Business Presentation: Guide to Making Great Presentations ...

    The step-by-step instructions are coherent and well-organized, making the reader excited to test-drive the product. 10. Snapchat Company Presentation. Snapchat's business model presentation is on a funkier, more casual side, reflective of the company's overall brand and positioning.

  9. 8 Tips for a Winning Company Presentation!

    Involve your audience by starting with words such as "Imagine…". Focus less on "we" (your company) and more on "you" (your audience). These techniques will help you open the door to your audience's subconscious - which is where most decisions are made. Leave enough time to rehearse your presentation.

  10. How to Make a Business Presentation (12 Easy Tips)

    Make your presentation interactive. Help your audience break out of autopilot by engaging with them during your presentation. Create a dialogue between you and your audience by asking questions, using anecdotes, or opening it up to stories and feedback. 9. Use visual aids to keep your audience engaged.

  11. Company Presentation: How To Write One (With Tips)

    How to create a company presentation. Here is a list of steps for creating a powerful company presentation: 1. Talk about the company. When talking about your company, it's beneficial to briefly describe what it does and the major services it provides to customers. For example, if you work for a construction company, you might say, "Lake ...

  12. 9 Tips For More Powerful Business Presentations

    2. Include a Goal Early in the Presentation. If your audience knows the purpose or goal of the presentation from the start, they are more likely to relate what you have to say with that purpose as ...

  13. The Ultimate Brand Identity Presentation Guide

    Your brand identity. 1. Mission and Vision. Including your mission and vision in your brand identity design presentation is vital because it defines your brand's purpose and long-term goals. You should structure these slides with a brief introduction followed by concise mission and vision statements: 2. Brand Purpose.

  14. How to Prepare an Impactful Business Presentation in 8 Steps

    Step 1: The Foundation to Your Business Presentation - Goal, Audience, Past Experience. This first step is essential for a successful business presentation, as it sets the foundation for the rest of your preparation. Ask yourself what exactly it is that you want to achieve with this presentation.

  15. Company Presentation: What Your Prospects Want to See

    5 Key Parts of a Company Presentation. When you talk about your business during a sales pitch, your company presentation has to be very tight, well-organized and compelling. The best visual format for your company presentation, which is often in PowerPoint, is to include an image with a couple of bullet points on each slide.. To create a website quickly, we recommend Wix (affiliate link) for ...

  16. 16 Corporate Presentation Templates to Effectively Highlight Your Company

    This corporate presentation template offers 16 fully designed slides customizable to suit your specific needs. Whether you're presenting a business case study or sharing a personal success story, this template is ideal for professional and personal use. This template includes many 3D elements.

  17. 10 Corporate Deck Examples & Templates (That Stand Out)

    A corporate deck, or corporate pitch deck, is a presentation designed to convey the essential aspects of a business to potential investors, partners, or stakeholders. A corporate deck includes slides that outline the company's business model, products or services, target market, competition, team, financials, and growth strategy.

  18. Ten simple rules for effective presentation slides

    Rule 2: Spend only 1 minute per slide. When you present your slide in the talk, it should take 1 minute or less to discuss. This rule is really helpful for planning purposes—a 20-minute presentation should have somewhere around 20 slides. Also, frequently giving your audience new information to feast on helps keep them engaged.

  19. Free and customizable company presentation templates

    All templates are completely customizable on Canva's easy-to-use editor. Each sample company presentation comes with a set of several pre-designed slides that you can tweak as much or as little as you need. Replace the fonts and colors to comply with your organization's branding guidelines. Add visuals, including your photos, cartoons, and ...

  20. Local Furniture Stores in Ul'yanovsk

    Find furniture stores and showrooms near me on Houzz. Before you hire a furniture and accessory company in Ul'yanovsk, Ulyanovsk Oblast, browse through our network of over 41 local furniture stores and showrooms. Read through customer reviews, check out their past projects and then request a quote from the best furniture stores and showrooms ...

  21. New & Custom Home Builders in Ul'yanovsk

    Search 10 Ul'yanovsk new & custom home builders to find the best custom home builder for your project. See the top reviewed local custom home builders in Ul'yanovsk, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia on Houzz.

  22. Deck Builders & Contractors in Ul'yanovsk

    Exterior patio contractors and decking companies typically handle decorative and functional details that go hand in hand with outdoor rooms, such as exterior lighting and fire pits. Patio and deck services might also provide landscaping as part of the business so make sure to inquire about that before hiring a separate pro.

  23. Industrial Group Mida (Microelectronic Sensors), Russia

    Company Description. IG MIDA manufactures pressure transducers and transmitters. Also power supplies, including intrinsic-safe version, intrinsic-safe digital indicators of pressure or. temperature, surge-protection devices. Our products has. been ssuccsuccessfully working in many power stations. (+atomic), gas and petroleum production ...