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 How to Write a Perfect Analytical Paragraph

 How to Write a Perfect Analytical Paragraph

  • 8-minute read
  • 30th January 2023

If you are looking up how to write an analytical paragraph, you are most likely writing an argumentative or analytical essay. Analytical essays are similar to other essays, such as descriptive essays, in that you have a central idea, organize supporting ideas into body paragraphs, and make conclusions.

However, analytical essays differ from other essays because the writer must go further. They require the writer to interpret and analyze a given text or information using evidence to support their central idea or thesis statement. This analysis takes place in analytical paragraphs, or body paragraphs, if you are writing an analytical essay .

In this article, you’ll learn the components of a perfect analytical paragraph: the topic sentence, evidence, analysis, and conclusion. Keep reading to learn more.

What Is an Analytical Paragraph?

An analytical paragraph is a paragraph that breaks down a piece of literature, an idea, or a concept into smaller parts and analyzes each part to understand the whole. Being able to write an effective and successful analytical paragraph reflects a writer’s critical thinking and organizational writing skills. All in all, like any other type of writing, writing an analytical paragraph requires skill and practice.

Write the Topic Sentence

A topic sentence is usually the first, or sometimes second, sentence at the beginning of anybody paragraph. Your topic sentence should contain one main idea related to the thesis statement . If it is not related to your thesis statement, then you are likely off topic.

Pro Tip: If your topic sentence is the second sentence of your paragraph, then your first sentence should be a transitional sentence .

Let’s look at a thesis statement and some topic sentences to get a better idea.

Topic: Examine and analyze the marriages in George Eliot’s Middlemarch .

Thesis Statement: Eliot uses three different marriages to give depth to everyday people and show the reader the struggles of marriage within the nineteenth century’s societal standards of submissive roles, class range, and financial status.

Topic Sentence 1: Lydgate and Rosamond had a terrible marriage in Middlemarch , like all other marriages during this time.

This topic sentence is not effective because it is not specific enough and does not directly relate to the thesis statement. It does not mention how their “terrible” marriage is related to submissive roles, class range, or financial status. Additionally, the overly generalized language of “all” marriages being terrible marriages during this time is a weak argument.

Topic Sentence 2: Financial matters play a huge role in the Lydgate and Rosamond marriage, as Lydgate has no money and Rosamond is a big spender.

This topic sentence is effective because it directly supports the thesis statement. It is focused on the financial status of this marriage.

Provide Evidence

The type of evidence you use to support your topic sentence will largely depend on the topic of your analytical essay. For example, if you are writing an essay related to a work of literature, you will need to provide direct quotes, paraphrasing, specific details, or a summary from the work to support your main idea. If your topic is related to analyzing data, then you may use figures, statistics, or charts and graph evidence to support your topic sentence.

Regardless of what type of evidence you provide, it must be appropriate and directly relate to and support your topic sentence.

For example, if we take the above thesis and topic sentence, we might select direct quotes, paraphrases, or summaries from the novel Middlemarch that depict the marriage’s financial stress.

Pro Tip: When using direct quotes, make sure you always provide an in-text citation and use correct punctuation to ensure your essay is neat and clean.

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Once you have provided evidence, you should analyze it to illustrate its significance and how it relates to the topic sentence. In your analysis, you can discuss how an author uses certain literary devices to emphasize character traits, themes, patterns, and connections in a literary work.

Be sure that your analysis always connects to the topic sentence/main idea of the paragraph. Avoid introducing new ideas in this section. Save those for later paragraphs or consider creating a new one to explore and analyze the new point.

Conclude Your Paragraph

When closing an analytical paragraph, you can consider doing two things:

●  Briefly emphasize the main point your reader should take away after having read the paragraph.

●  Begin a transition if the analysis continues into the next paragraph. (This strategy may be more suitable for longer, more in-depth analytical essays).

Using the above example topic sentence, we might conclude the paragraph as follows:

Notice how this concluding statement not only emphasizes the main points from the paragraph but also ties back into the thesis statement.

Writing Tips For Analytical Paragraphs

Leave out first person language.

Avoid using language such as “in my opinion,” “from my perspective,” or “I think.” While the analysis is your interpretation of a text or information, you should rely on and focus on using evidence to support your ideas. Overall, you should aim to maintain an objective tone .

Instead of saying “I think Rosamond is manipulative,” you should use evidence from the text to show that she was manipulative. For example, “Rosamond shows a pattern of manipulation throughout Middlemarch , specifically toward her husband. For instance, she says, ‘…’”

Do Writing Exercises

When writing, especially in the early drafts of an essay, it is typical to find the main idea of a paragraph at the end. This is a natural course for our thinking process. However, the main idea should be presented as your topic sentence at the beginning of this paragraph. Additionally, most students leave this main idea at the end because they do not identify it as the main idea.

To overcome this dilemma, try a looping prewriting exercise . In this exercise, you write continuously for a designated time (maybe 10 minutes, your choice). At the end of that time, read over what you’ve written and circle the main idea of the text (this is usually at the end). In the next cycle, you start with this main idea at the beginning and further examine and analyze it.

This is a wonderful exercise to help you pick out main ideas and delve deeper into your analysis.

Get Feedback

If you are a student, there are several options to get feedback for free. Ask a friend to read your essay. Go to your writing center to get feedback and help with your writing. Go to your professor’s office hours with your writing or questions to get detailed advice. More often than not, they are happy to see you take advantage of their expertise.

As a working professional, writer, or author, you can look to fellow authors or bookish friends to read your work. You can find free beta readers online from sites such as Goodreads to get feedback from your target audience. You can also find writing groups on social media platforms.

Proofread Your Work

It can be easy to finish writing an essay and think “Finally, I’m done!” Unfortunately, that is only half the process. Be sure to always read and reread your writing before hitting submit. Check for stray commas, spelling errors, or awkward sentences to make your main ideas and hard work shine. Learn about 6 Quick and Easy Tips for Proofreading you can do at home.

Writing an analytical paragraph doesn’t have to be stressful. Be sure to include a topic sentence at the beginning of your paragraph that connects to the thesis statement. Provide a variety of evidence to support your main idea, analyze the text by highlighting literary devices used, themes, and patterns, and end with a brief concluding statement.

If you need more help with writing analysis, descriptive essays, or any other type of essay, then Proofed is here to help. Try our free trial today!

What Is a Topic Sentence?

A topic sentence goes at the beginning of a body paragraph and clearly states the main idea of the paragraph.

How Do I Organize an Analytical Paragraph?

An analytical paragraph has four components: topic sentence, evidence, analysis, and conclusion. The topic sentence is the most important part of any body paragraph because it establishes the main idea of the paragraph and relates to the thesis statement.

What Makes a Good Analytical Paragraph?

A good analytical paragraph has a clear topic sentence, strong evidence, and a thorough analysis that reflects the writer’s critical thinking and writing skills. It should conclude by emphasizing the main idea of the paragraph and how it supports the essay overall.

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How to Write the Body of an Analysis Essay

Whether you're writing about the criminal justice system or the rise in childhood obesity, the body of your analysis essay is the part that does all the work. Inside each body paragraph, the writer incorporates explanation, analysis and specific examples that examine the topic and defend the thesis statement.

Topic Sentence

If you look at each body paragraph as a mini-essay, then the topic sentence is like the thesis statement. It is generally the first sentence of each body paragraph and tells the reader the main point of the paragraph. Just as with the thesis statement, the topic sentence should be neither too general nor too specific. Purdue University states that students should "look for a topic sentence that is general enough to show the paragraph’s main idea instead of just one of its details." For the writer, it serves as a map to prevent the content from straying off-topic.

The analysis in a body paragraph serves to explain and develop your point. Asking yourself questions as you write can help to successfully develop your statements. For example, why does this matter? Why does this happen? Whom does this affect, and how? What are the long-term effects? The responses to these questions -- not the questions themselves -- can be incorporated into your body paragraphs as analysis. For example, when analyzing a text, a student can include her interpretation and analysis of why the author chose to include a particular character, symbol or event.

Specific Examples

Every body paragraph should include support in the form of specific examples. Effective support can include properly cited quotations, hypothetical examples, real world events and personal anecdotes. The function of providing specific examples is to give concrete evidence of the topic sentence. When incorporating concrete evidence, it is crucial to explain specifically how the evidence supports the topic sentence, rather than just sticking in a quotation without any analysis.

Wrap-Up Sentence

Each body paragraph should conclude with a wrap-up sentence that shows readers how the information presented in the paragraph supports the overall point of the essay. An effective final sentence in a body paragraph also helps to transition into the next paragraph by creating a bridge to the next topic sentence. The wrap-up sentence is like the conclusion of the overall essay in that it restates the topic sentence's idea in light of the analysis and evidence provided in the paragraph.

  • Purdue University Writing Lab: Body Paragraphs
  • Loyola University: Paragraphs -- The Body of the Essay
  • Purdue University Writing Lab: Topic Sentences

Soheila Battaglia is a published and award-winning author and filmmaker. She holds an MA in literary cultures from New York University and a BA in ethnic studies from UC Berkeley. She is a college professor of literature and composition.

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

How to Write an Analytical Essay: Your Guide + Tips and Examples

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

Defining What Is an Analytical Essay

If scrutinizing different tasks and constantly thinking out of the box are something you enjoy doing, then the analytical essay writing might be a fun assignment for you! With careful, in-depth analysis and the use of proper literary devices, you may discover a whole new set of perspectives and enrich your understanding of your chosen topic.

To be able to uncover the hidden pieces of literature and captivate your reader, first, you must understand what is an analytical essay and what it tries to accomplish. In a nutshell, analytical essays use textual evidence to support the author's claims and main points by utilizing logic and facts rather than relying on sentimental appeals and personal narratives.

Unlike a persuasive essay, where you only need to prove one side of the argument, analytical essay requires understanding and presenting all sides of an argument. At the end, you should discuss whether you agree or disagree with the analysis you have done.

Creating an Analytical Essay Outline Template

Now that you better understand the definition analytical essay, it's time to master the process of composing a top-notch paper. In order to streamline the writing process, you should put your thoughts into perspective and structure your arguments in a clear format. For this, you need to employ an analytical essay outline that will serve as a roadmap from the beginning to crafting a compelling concluding paragraph. So, let's break down the essential steps required for a proper analytical essay outline template to ensure you leave a lasting impact on your audience.

‍Introduction‍

  • Background information
  • Thesis statement

Body paragraph 1‍

  • Topic sentence
  • Supporting evidence
  • Transition to the body paragraph to‍

Body paragraph 2‍

  • Transition to body paragraph 3

Body paragraph 3

  • Transition to conclusion
  • Summary of major points
  • Restate the thesis
  • Key takeaways

STEPS TO CHOOSING AN ANALYTICAL ESSAY TOPIC

Analytical Essay Introduction

The process of creating an introduction for an analytical paper is the same as for any other sort of essay. So, if you wondered how to start an analytical essay, remember that as the introduction is the first thing a reader reads, it's critical to grab their attention and ensure that they are aware of the topic of the paper. A strong beginning gives background information, outlines the paper's purpose clearly, and makes a few references to the assertions you will make.

The opening sentence needs to have a hook. In other words, it must draw the reader in and persuade them to continue reading the essay. A hook may be anything fascinating and related to your topics, such as an intriguing fact, a funny story, or a provocative inquiry.

Afterward, establish your thesis, which should be a brief and unambiguous summary of the stance you will take in your essay.

Analytical Essay Thesis Statement

So, how to write a thesis for an analytical essay? Your thesis statement should be clear enough to steer the flow of your essay and should highlight the primary subject you will be examining, along with the supporting details or logic you'll use to back it up. A strong analytical thesis should be precise and straightforward. Therefore, it should present a claim rather than merely summarizing the subject or material under consideration. A compelling analytical thesis statement would be something like: 'Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Raven' addresses the issue of loss and the mental torment it causes, eventually indicating that the only way to find peace is through tolerance.' This thesis statement states the fundamental point regarding the material and the strategies the essay will use to defend that claim.

The last step effectively flows from your introduction into the first body paragraph, which should expound on the first idea you will be addressing. By adhering to these essay format rules, you may create an effective and convincing opening that serves as the foundation for an analytical essay that is well-structured and appealing.

Analytical Essay Body Paragraphs

An analytical essay generally exceeds the traditional five-paragraph structure since additional body paragraphs may be required to adequately defend the thesis statement. The evidence and arguments in these body paragraphs support the thesis statement and are the essay's main body.

  • Topic sentence that clearly states the direction of analysis for the paragraph
  • The main piece of evidence for your claim
  • Supporting information
  • Transition to the next paragraph

The first sentence of your body paragraph should give the reader an idea of the specific issue that the paragraph will talk about. For example, if the essay is about the gamification of education, the topic sentence for the first body paragraph can be 'Educational video games are being used in many third world countries to help children who cannot access standard schooling systems.' Using this topic sentence, you may clarify the subject of the paragraph and offer supporting evidence.

A good topic sentence helps the reader keep track of and structures the flow of your analysis paper. Imagine having a conversation with a friend about a topic. The main pieces of support you make for your claim are topic sentences. 

The rest of the body paragraph includes factual information proving your topic sentence's validity. Each body paragraph should talk about only one issue, so make sure that the evidence you provide is related only to the specific claim you are making in that paragraph. It can be tempting to provide as much evidence as possible. Still, papers that are too dense with information can be hard to read and understand, so only mention the most important facts and figures. 

The main phrase should be briefly restated at the end of each body paragraph, highlighting how the arguments you've made support it. This is an excellent technique to move into the following body paragraph, which includes a new piece of evidence and analysis from a different point of view. A one-sentence summary or another kind of transition statement helps the essay flow better and builds a more convincing overall argument

Paper's conclusion paragraph frequently follows a predetermined format, restating the thesis statement and summarizing the key concepts covered in the body paragraphs. The conclusion of the essay may also include a remark or comment on the significance of the analysis in order to leave the reader with a lasting impression of its major point.

  • Reiterate the thesis
  • Recite the key details
  • Give supporting documentation
  • Suggest recommendations for further research

If someone can understand the purpose of your paper just by reading the conclusion, then you have written a good conclusion paragraph. By restating your thesis at the beginning, you reminded the reader of the main purpose of your essay. Going through three body paragraphs is important so the reader can connect the evidence presented and the thesis statement. 

Follow this up with a brief summary of the main claims and analysis in each body paragraph. Since you have already presented evidence backing up the claims, rephrase the main topic sentences and put together a convincing argument for your points. Make sure you don't include new evidence or points of analysis in the conclusion because this might confuse the reader. The conclusion paragraph only recaps and summarizes information. If you have a new point of analysis, then add a new body paragraph. 

Finally, end the conclusion paragraph with some of your own thoughts. Explain why the topic is important, why your perspective adds new information, how your analysis compares to experts in the field, etc. 

Meanwhile, you might also be interested in how to write a reflection paper , so check out the article for more information! Send us your assignment requirements, choose your personal research paper writer , and watch them write your paper.

Steps For How to Write an Analytical Essay

After uncovering the structure of an analytical essay, there are a few more things you can do to make the process of writing an analytical essay easier before you actually start writing it. The writing process will be made simpler, and the essay will have a better overall flow and structure the more preparation you do in advance. Before you begin writing, you should take the following steps from our write my essay for me experts:

how to write an analytical essay

Brainstorm Some Ideas

A good analytical essay writer spends some time brainstorming and making a mental map of thoughts associated with their subject before deciding on a theme. This might assist you in coming up with original and intriguing approaches to your study. You may, for instance, come up with a list of several ideas or motifs that emerge in the book and assess their relevance if your essay is about literature.

Use Visual Aids

Our expert research paper writer suggests communicating your research clearly and engagingly by using graphs and charts to help you arrange your insights. For instance, you could make a chart that contradicts two hypotheses or a diagram that illustrates the relationships between various protagonists in a play.

Use Contrasting Opinions

Including opposing viewpoints in your paper may seem unproductive, yet doing so is a terrific approach to developing a strong case for your position. Find the strongest opposing viewpoint and create a body paragraph that uses evidence to demonstrate why it is incorrect. Because it demonstrates that you have thought about alternative opinions, and by weakening the stronger one, it strengthens your case.

Use Primary Sources

When writing an analytical essay, utilizing primary materials like interviews, presentations, and original documents can provide an exceptional outlook on your chosen subject matter. By integrating primary sources into your analysis, you can construct a more intricate and exclusive perspective. For instance, if you are composing an analytical essay about a historical event, delving into letters or memoirs penned by individuals who lived during that time can assist you in gaining a deeper understanding of their viewpoints and experiences.

Use Multimedia Elements

Using multimedia in your essay, such as photographs, films, or audio recordings, may increase reader interest and make the analysis more vivid and engaging. For instance, you might include photographs of the artwork in your essay to graphically explain and demonstrate your observation if you were writing an analytical essay on a masterpiece. This strategy may not only assist in concept clarification but also provide additional life and intrigue to your writing.

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Analytical Essay Topics

As mentioned above, finding the right topic is vitally important when it comes to answering the question of how to write an analytical essay. Which is why we devoted this section to providing you with good options. Remember that a good topic:

  • Is something you generally find interesting
  • Should attract a reader's attention
  • It should not be too broad
  • Needs enough quality research to present evidence
  • Asks a question that is important

Finding a good topic for an analytical research paper isn't easy, but make sure you spend enough time pinpointing something that fulfills the criteria. The choice between finding writing enjoyable and receiving a good grade or finding it tedious and receiving a poor grade depends on the topic.

So, here is a list of good topics from our dissertation services to get you started.

Analytical Essay Topics about Psychology

Here are some topics on psychology essay writing:

  • What qualifies as a mental disorder?
  • Why do more young people feel lonely?
  • What is the effect of lockdowns on mental health?
  • Is happiness an illusion?
  • What are effective methods of coping with depression?

Analytical Essay Topics about Pop Culture

  • Why DOTA is the perfect game
  • What is the impact of the Marvel Cinematic Universe?
  • An analysis of the history of Science Fiction
  • Why blank is the best music genre
  • The rise and fall of Kanye West

Analytical Essay Topics about Art and History

  • How does World War II still affect us?
  • An analysis of postmodern art.
  • Are all artists geniuses?
  • What is the influence of the Renaissance?
  • What are the lessons learned from war?

Analytical Essay Examples

I assume you are going to use the examples that are already on the website

Despite the difference in doctrines, the Jews, Christians, and Muslims have in one way or another related in accordance to their faith and beliefs. The three monotheistic religions are known for their high regard for their disparities despite the similarities they manifest. It is not only a matter that concerns the religions themselves, but also the society given the world is slowly changing and more people have begun to question the existence of each religion in essence. While, the similarities may be just but subtle, the extent of reach is relatively wide, and for that cause the standing of these religion need some inspection. Noteworthy, there are common features in the religions such as the tenacious adherence by certain groups, which may also pose the question regarding not only lack of choice but also the need to be considered one.
A major consequence of war is in its ability to demolish traditional values and introducing drastic changes the perceptions of the world among those who experience the horror and devastation that define war. For military personnel, assuming a normal life after war is a form of torture because for such an individual visualizing the society from an optimistic perspective is relatively difficult considering that it always in the brink of war which threatens the peace that may be prevailing. Hemmingway uses this story to reminisce about his life after participating in the First World War. It was from his experience in the war as a driver for the Italian Army that he developed depression and he experienced multiple injuries.

Final Concluding Thoughts

By using the advice and illustrations provided by us, you may improve your writing abilities and produce essays that fascinate and interest your audience. You can master analytical writing with dedication and practice, enabling you to confidently take on any topic.

Meanwhile, If you are looking for a place to buy essay online , leave us a simple message like ' do my homework for me ' and we will be right on it!

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How to Write an Analytical Essay

Last Updated: February 2, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Megan Morgan, PhD . Megan Morgan is a Graduate Program Academic Advisor in the School of Public & International Affairs at the University of Georgia. She earned her PhD in English from the University of Georgia in 2015. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 3,980,232 times.

Writing an analytical essay can seem daunting, especially if you've never done it before. Don't worry! Take a deep breath, buy yourself a caffeinated beverage, and follow these steps to create a well-crafted analytical essay.

Prewriting for Your Essay

Step 1 Understand the objective of an analytical essay.

  • For example, "Stanley Kubrick's The Shining uses a repeating motif of Native American culture and art to comment on America's history of colonizing Native Americans' lands" is an analytical thesis. It is analyzing a particular text and setting forth an argument about it in the form of a thesis statement.

Step 2 Decide what to write about.

  • If you're writing an analytical essay about a work of fiction, you could focus your argument on what motivates a specific character or group of characters. Or, you could argue why a certain line or paragraph is central to the work as a whole. For example: Explore the concept of vengeance in the epic poem Beowulf .
  • If you're writing about a historical event, try focusing on the forces that contributed to what happened.
  • If you're writing about scientific research or findings, follow the scientific method to analyze your results.

Step 3 Brainstorm.

  • Look for repeated imagery, metaphors, phrases, or ideas. Things that repeat are often important. See if you can decipher why these things are so crucial. Do they repeat in the same way each time, or differently?
  • How does the text work? If you're writing a rhetorical analysis, for example, you might analyze how the author uses logical appeals to support her argument and decide whether you think the argument is effective. If you're analyzing a creative work, consider things like imagery, visuals in a film, etc. If you're analyzing research, you may want to consider the methods and results and analyze whether the experiment is a good design.
  • A mind map can be helpful to some people. Start with your central topic, and arrange smaller ideas around it in bubbles. Connect the bubbles to identify patterns and how things are related.
  • Good brainstorming can be all over the place. In fact, that can be a good way to start off! Don't discount any ideas just yet. Write down any element or fact that you think of as you examine your topic.

Step 4 Come up with...

  • This is an analytical thesis because it examines a text and makes a particular claim.
  • The claim is "arguable," meaning it's not a statement of pure fact that nobody could contest. An analytical essay takes a side and makes an argument.
  • Make sure your thesis is narrow enough to fit the scope of your assignment. "Revenge in Beowulf could be a PhD dissertation, it's so broad. It's probably much too big for a student essay. However, arguing that one character's revenge is more honorable than another's is manageable within a shorter student essay. [3] X Research source
  • Unless instructed to write one, avoid the "three-prong" thesis that presents three points to be discussed later. These thesis statements usually limit your analysis too much and give your argument a formulaic feel. It's okay to state generally what your argument will be.

Step 5 Find supporting evidence.

  • Example of supporting evidence : To support a claim that the dragon’s vengeance was more righteous than Grendel's mother's, look at the passages in the poem that discuss the events leading up to each monster’s attack, the attacks themselves, as well as the reactions to those attacks. Don't: ignore or twist evidence to fit your thesis. Do: adjust your thesis to a more nuanced position as you learn more about the topic.

Step 6 Make an ...

  • If you're not quite sure how all your evidence fits together, don't worry! Making an outline can help you figure out how your argument should progress.
  • You can also make a more informal outline that groups your ideas together in large groups. From there, you can decide what to talk about where.
  • Your essay will be as long as it needs to be to adequately discuss your topic. A common mistake students make is to choose a large topic and then allow only 3 body paragraphs to discuss it. This makes essays feel shallow or rushed. Don't be afraid to spend enough time discussing each detail!

Writing Your Essay

Step 1 Write your ...

  • Example introduction : Revenge was a legally recognized right in ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. The many revenges in the epic poem Beowulf show that retribution was an essential part of the Anglo-Saxon age. However, not all revenges are created alike. The poet's portrayal of these revenges suggests that the dragon was more honorable in his act of revenge than Grendel's mother.
  • This introduction gives your readers information they should know to understand your argument, and then presents an argument about the complexity of a general topic (revenge) in the poem. This type of argument can be interesting because it suggests that the reader needs to think about the text very carefully and not take it at face value. Don't: include filler and fluff sentences beginning with "In modern society" or "Throughout time." Do: briefly mention the title, author, and publication date of the text you're analyzing.

Step 2 Write your body paragraphs.

  • Example topic sentence : The key to differentiating between the two attacks is the notion of excessive retribution.
  • Example analysis : Grendel's mother does not simply want vengeance, as per the Medieval concept of ‘an eye for an eye.’ Instead, she wants to take a life for a life while also throwing Hrothgar’s kingdom into chaos.
  • Example evidence : Instead of simply killing Aeschere, and thus enacting just revenge, she “quickly [snatches] up” that nobleman and, with him “tight in her clutches,” she leaves for the fen (1294). She does this to lure Beowulf away from Heorot so she can kill him as well.
  • The formula "CEE" may help you remember: Claim-Evidence-Explanation. Whenever you present a claim, make sure you present evidence to support that claim and explain how the evidence relates to your claim.

Step 3 Know when to quote or paraphrase.

  • Example of a quote : Instead of simply killing Aeschere, and thus enacting just revenge, she “quickly [snatches] up” that nobleman and, with him “tight in her clutches,” she leaves for the fen (1294).
  • Example of a paraphrased sentence : The female Grendel enters Heorot, snatches up one of the men sleeping inside it, and runs away to the fen (1294).

Step 4 Write your conclusion.

  • Example conclusion : The concept of an ‘eye for an eye’ was very present in the early Medieval world. However, by comparing the attacks of both Grendel's mother and the dragon, the medieval world’s perception of righteous vengeance versus unjust revenge is made clear. While the dragon acts out in the only way he knows how, Grendel's mother attacks with evil intent.
  • Example conclusion with a ‘bigger world connection’: The concept of an ‘eye for an eye’ was very present in the early Medieval world. However, by comparing the attacks of both Grendel's mother and the dragon, the medieval world’s perception of righteous vengeance versus unjust revenge is made clear. While the dragon acts out in the only way he knows how, Grendel's mother attacks with evil intent. As we saw from the study of other characters, these portrayals may tie into an early Medieval perception that women had greater potential for evil.

Finalizing Your Essay

Step 1 Proofread your essay for spelling or grammar mistakes.

  • Make sure to also format your essay correctly. For example, using a 12-pt standard font (like Arial or Times New Roman) and 1" margins is standard.

Step 2 Read your paper out loud.

  • If you are analyzing a film, look up the list of characters online. Check two or three sources to make sure that you have the correct spelling.

Step 4 Read your paper as if you were your teacher.

Analytical Essay Writing Help

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Ask yourself "What am I trying to prove?" The answer should be in your thesis. If not, go back and fix it. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • If you are writing a formal analysis or critique, then avoid using colloquial writing . Though informal language may bring some color to a paper, you do not want to risk weakening your argument by influencing it with verbal slang. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Avoid being too vague. Vagueness leaves room for misinterpretation and in a coherent, analytical essay, leaving room for misinterpretation decreases the effectiveness of your argument. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

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  • ↑ https://www.stetson.edu/other/writing-center/media/Handout%20-%20Analytical%20Essay.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.bucks.edu/media/bcccmedialibrary/pdf/HOWTOWRITEALITERARYANALYSISESSAY_10.15.07_001.pdf
  • ↑ http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/rsrchppr.html
  • ↑ https://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/undergraduates/writing-guides/how-can-i-create-stronger-analysis-.html
  • ↑ https://academics.umw.edu/writing-fredericksburg/files/2011/09/Basic-Outlines.pdf
  • ↑ https://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/undergraduates/writing-guides/how-do-i-write-an-intro--conclusion----body-paragraph.html
  • ↑ https://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/undergraduates/writing-guides/how-do-i-incorporate-quotes-.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/proofreading_suggestions.html
  • ↑ https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/writingprocess/proofreading

About This Article

Megan Morgan, PhD

To write an analytical essay, first write an introduction that gives your reader background information and introduces your thesis. Then, write body paragraphs in support of your thesis that include a topic sentence, an analysis of some part of the text, and evidence from the text that supports your analysis. You can use direct quotes from the text that support your point of view or paraphrase if you’re trying to summarize information. Finally, complete your essay with a conclusion that reiterates your thesis and your primary support for it. To learn from our English reviewer how to come up with your thesis statement and find evidence that supports it, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Do you need to write an analytical essay for school? What sets this kind of essay apart from other types, and what must you include when you write your own analytical essay? In this guide, we break down the process of writing an analytical essay by explaining the key factors your essay needs to have, providing you with an outline to help you structure your essay, and analyzing a complete analytical essay example so you can see what a finished essay looks like.

What Is an Analytical Essay?

Before you begin writing an analytical essay, you must know what this type of essay is and what it includes. Analytical essays analyze something, often (but not always) a piece of writing or a film.

An analytical essay is more than just a synopsis of the issue though; in this type of essay you need to go beyond surface-level analysis and look at what the key arguments/points of this issue are and why. If you’re writing an analytical essay about a piece of writing, you’ll look into how the text was written and why the author chose to write it that way. Instead of summarizing, an analytical essay typically takes a narrower focus and looks at areas such as major themes in the work, how the author constructed and supported their argument, how the essay used  literary devices to enhance its messages, etc.

While you certainly want people to agree with what you’ve written, unlike with persuasive and argumentative essays, your main purpose when writing an analytical essay isn’t to try to convert readers to your side of the issue. Therefore, you won’t be using strong persuasive language like you would in those essay types. Rather, your goal is to have enough analysis and examples that the strength of your argument is clear to readers.

Besides typical essay components like an introduction and conclusion, a good analytical essay will include:

  • A thesis that states your main argument
  • Analysis that relates back to your thesis and supports it
  • Examples to support your analysis and allow a more in-depth look at the issue

In the rest of this article, we’ll explain how to include each of these in your analytical essay.

How to Structure Your Analytical Essay

Analytical essays are structured similarly to many other essays you’ve written, with an introduction (including a thesis), several body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Below is an outline you can follow when structuring your essay, and in the next section we go into more detail on how to write an analytical essay.

Introduction

Your introduction will begin with some sort of attention-grabbing sentence to get your audience interested, then you’ll give a few sentences setting up the topic so that readers have some context, and you’ll end with your thesis statement. Your introduction will include:

  • Brief background information explaining the issue/text
  • Your thesis

Body Paragraphs

Your analytical essay will typically have three or four body paragraphs, each covering a different point of analysis. Begin each body paragraph with a sentence that sets up the main point you’ll be discussing. Then you’ll give some analysis on that point, backing it up with evidence to support your claim. Continue analyzing and giving evidence for your analysis until you’re out of strong points for the topic. At the end of each body paragraph, you may choose to have a transition sentence that sets up what the next paragraph will be about, but this isn’t required. Body paragraphs will include:

  • Introductory sentence explaining what you’ll cover in the paragraph (sort of like a mini-thesis)
  • Analysis point
  • Evidence (either passages from the text or data/facts) that supports the analysis
  • (Repeat analysis and evidence until you run out of examples)

You won’t be making any new points in your conclusion; at this point you’re just reiterating key points you’ve already made and wrapping things up. Begin by rephrasing your thesis and summarizing the main points you made in the essay. Someone who reads just your conclusion should be able to come away with a basic idea of what your essay was about and how it was structured. After this, you may choose to make some final concluding thoughts, potentially by connecting your essay topic to larger issues to show why it’s important. A conclusion will include:

  • Paraphrase of thesis
  • Summary of key points of analysis
  • Final concluding thought(s)

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5 Steps for Writing an Analytical Essay

Follow these five tips to break down writing an analytical essay into manageable steps. By the end, you’ll have a fully-crafted analytical essay with both in-depth analysis and enough evidence to support your argument. All of these steps use the completed analytical essay in the next section as an example.

#1: Pick a Topic

You may have already had a topic assigned to you, and if that’s the case, you can skip this step. However, if you haven’t, or if the topic you’ve been assigned is broad enough that you still need to narrow it down, then you’ll need to decide on a topic for yourself. Choosing the right topic can mean the difference between an analytical essay that’s easy to research (and gets you a good grade) and one that takes hours just to find a few decent points to analyze

Before you decide on an analytical essay topic, do a bit of research to make sure you have enough examples to support your analysis. If you choose a topic that’s too narrow, you’ll struggle to find enough to write about.

For example, say your teacher assigns you to write an analytical essay about the theme in John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath of exposing injustices against migrants. For it to be an analytical essay, you can’t just recount the injustices characters in the book faced; that’s only a summary and doesn’t include analysis. You need to choose a topic that allows you to analyze the theme. One of the best ways to explore a theme is to analyze how the author made his/her argument. One example here is that Steinbeck used literary devices in the intercalary chapters (short chapters that didn’t relate to the plot or contain the main characters of the book) to show what life was like for migrants as a whole during the Dust Bowl.

You could write about how Steinbeck used literary devices throughout the whole book, but, in the essay below, I chose to just focus on the intercalary chapters since they gave me enough examples. Having a narrower focus will nearly always result in a tighter and more convincing essay (and can make compiling examples less overwhelming).

#2: Write a Thesis Statement

Your thesis statement is the most important sentence of your essay; a reader should be able to read just your thesis and understand what the entire essay is about and what you’ll be analyzing. When you begin writing, remember that each sentence in your analytical essay should relate back to your thesis

In the analytical essay example below, the thesis is the final sentence of the first paragraph (the traditional spot for it). The thesis is: “In The Grapes of Wrath’s intercalary chapters, John Steinbeck employs a variety of literary devices and stylistic choices to better expose the injustices committed against migrants in the 1930s.” So what will this essay analyze? How Steinbeck used literary devices in the intercalary chapters to show how rough migrants could have it. Crystal clear.

#3: Do Research to Find Your Main Points

This is where you determine the bulk of your analysis--the information that makes your essay an analytical essay. My preferred method is to list every idea that I can think of, then research each of those and use the three or four strongest ones for your essay. Weaker points may be those that don’t relate back to the thesis, that you don’t have much analysis to discuss, or that you can’t find good examples for. A good rule of thumb is to have one body paragraph per main point

This essay has four main points, each of which analyzes a different literary device Steinbeck uses to better illustrate how difficult life was for migrants during the Dust Bowl. The four literary devices and their impact on the book are:

  • Lack of individual names in intercalary chapters to illustrate the scope of the problem
  • Parallels to the Bible to induce sympathy for the migrants
  • Non-showy, often grammatically-incorrect language so the migrants are more realistic and relatable to readers
  • Nature-related metaphors to affect the mood of the writing and reflect the plight of the migrants

#4: Find Excerpts or Evidence to Support Your Analysis

Now that you have your main points, you need to back them up. If you’re writing a paper about a text or film, use passages/clips from it as your main source of evidence. If you’re writing about something else, your evidence can come from a variety of sources, such as surveys, experiments, quotes from knowledgeable sources etc. Any evidence that would work for a regular research paper works here.

In this example, I quoted multiple passages from The Grapes of Wrath  in each paragraph to support my argument. You should be able to back up every claim you make with evidence in order to have a strong essay.

#5: Put It All Together

Now it's time to begin writing your essay, if you haven’t already. Create an introductory paragraph that ends with the thesis, make a body paragraph for each of your main points, including both analysis and evidence to back up your claims, and wrap it all up with a conclusion that recaps your thesis and main points and potentially explains the big picture importance of the topic.

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Analytical Essay Example + Analysis

So that you can see for yourself what a completed analytical essay looks like, here’s an essay I wrote back in my high school days. It’s followed by analysis of how I structured my essay, what its strengths are, and how it could be improved.

One way Steinbeck illustrates the connections all migrant people possessed and the struggles they faced is by refraining from using specific titles and names in his intercalary chapters. While The Grapes of Wrath focuses on the Joad family, the intercalary chapters show that all migrants share the same struggles and triumphs as the Joads. No individual names are used in these chapters; instead the people are referred to as part of a group. Steinbeck writes, “Frantic men pounded on the doors of the doctors; and the doctors were busy.  And sad men left word at country stores for the coroner to send a car,” (555). By using generic terms, Steinbeck shows how the migrants are all linked because they have gone through the same experiences. The grievances committed against one family were committed against thousands of other families; the abuse extends far beyond what the Joads experienced. The Grapes of Wrath frequently refers to the importance of coming together; how, when people connect with others their power and influence multiplies immensely. Throughout the novel, the goal of the migrants, the key to their triumph, has been to unite. While their plans are repeatedly frustrated by the government and police, Steinbeck’s intercalary chapters provide a way for the migrants to relate to one another because they have encountered the same experiences. Hundreds of thousands of migrants fled to the promised land of California, but Steinbeck was aware that numbers alone were impersonal and lacked the passion he desired to spread. Steinbeck created the intercalary chapters to show the massive numbers of people suffering, and he created the Joad family to evoke compassion from readers.  Because readers come to sympathize with the Joads, they become more sensitive to the struggles of migrants in general. However, John Steinbeck frequently made clear that the Joads were not an isolated incident; they were not unique. Their struggles and triumphs were part of something greater. Refraining from specific names in his intercalary chapters allows Steinbeck to show the vastness of the atrocities committed against migrants.

Steinbeck also creates significant parallels to the Bible in his intercalary chapters in order to enhance his writing and characters. By using simple sentences and stylized writing, Steinbeck evokes Biblical passages. The migrants despair, “No work till spring. No work,” (556).  Short, direct sentences help to better convey the desperateness of the migrants’ situation. Throughout his novel, John Steinbeck makes connections to the Bible through his characters and storyline. Jim Casy’s allusions to Christ and the cycle of drought and flooding are clear biblical references.  By choosing to relate The Grapes of Wrath to the Bible, Steinbeck’s characters become greater than themselves. Starving migrants become more than destitute vagrants; they are now the chosen people escaping to the promised land. When a forgotten man dies alone and unnoticed, it becomes a tragedy. Steinbeck writes, “If [the migrants] were shot at, they did not run, but splashed sullenly away; and if they were hit, they sank tiredly in the mud,” (556). Injustices committed against the migrants become greater because they are seen as children of God through Steinbeck’s choice of language. Referencing the Bible strengthens Steinbeck’s novel and purpose: to create understanding for the dispossessed.  It is easy for people to feel disdain for shabby vagabonds, but connecting them to such a fundamental aspect of Christianity induces sympathy from readers who might have otherwise disregarded the migrants as so many other people did.

The simple, uneducated dialogue Steinbeck employs also helps to create a more honest and meaningful representation of the migrants, and it makes the migrants more relatable to readers. Steinbeck chooses to accurately represent the language of the migrants in order to more clearly illustrate their lives and make them seem more like real paper than just characters in a book. The migrants lament, “They ain’t gonna be no kinda work for three months,” (555). There are multiple grammatical errors in that single sentence, but it vividly conveys the despair the migrants felt better than a technically perfect sentence would. The Grapes of Wrath is intended to show the severe difficulties facing the migrants so Steinbeck employs a clear, pragmatic style of writing.  Steinbeck shows the harsh, truthful realities of the migrants’ lives and he would be hypocritical if he chose to give the migrants a more refined voice and not portray them with all their shortcomings. The depiction of the migrants as imperfect through their language also makes them easier to relate to. Steinbeck’s primary audience was the middle class, the less affluent of society. Repeatedly in The Grapes of Wrath , the wealthy make it obvious that they scorn the plight of the migrants. The wealthy, not bad luck or natural disasters, were the prominent cause of the suffering of migrant families such as the Joads. Thus, Steinbeck turns to the less prosperous for support in his novel. When referring to the superior living conditions barnyard animals have, the migrants remark, “Them’s horses-we’re men,” (556).  The perfect simplicity of this quote expresses the absurdness of the migrants’ situation better than any flowery expression could.

In The Grapes of Wrath , John Steinbeck uses metaphors, particularly about nature, in order to illustrate the mood and the overall plight of migrants. Throughout most of the book, the land is described as dusty, barren, and dead. Towards the end, however; floods come and the landscape begins to change. At the end of chapter twenty-nine, Steinbeck describes a hill after the floods saying, “Tiny points of grass came through the earth, and in a few days the hills were pale green with the beginning year,” (556). This description offers a stark contrast from the earlier passages which were filled with despair and destruction. Steinbeck’s tone from the beginning of the chapter changes drastically. Early in the chapter, Steinbeck had used heavy imagery in order to convey the destruction caused by the rain, “The streams and the little rivers edged up to the bank sides and worked at willows and tree roots, bent the willows deep in the current, cut out the roots of cottonwoods and brought down the trees,” (553). However, at the end of the chapter the rain has caused new life to grow in California. The new grass becomes a metaphor representing hope. When the migrants are at a loss over how they will survive the winter, the grass offers reassurance. The story of the migrants in the intercalary chapters parallels that of the Joads. At the end of the novel, the family is breaking apart and has been forced to flee their home. However, both the book and final intercalary chapter end on a hopeful note after so much suffering has occurred. The grass metaphor strengthens Steinbeck’s message because it offers a tangible example of hope. Through his language Steinbeck’s themes become apparent at the end of the novel. Steinbeck affirms that persistence, even when problems appear insurmountable, leads to success. These metaphors help to strengthen Steinbeck’s themes in The Grapes of Wrath because they provide a more memorable way to recall important messages.

John Steinbeck’s language choices help to intensify his writing in his intercalary chapters and allow him to more clearly show how difficult life for migrants could be. Refraining from using specific names and terms allows Steinbeck to show that many thousands of migrants suffered through the same wrongs. Imitating the style of the Bible strengthens Steinbeck’s characters and connects them to the Bible, perhaps the most famous book in history. When Steinbeck writes in the imperfect dialogue of the migrants, he creates a more accurate portrayal and makes the migrants easier to relate to for a less affluent audience. Metaphors, particularly relating to nature, strengthen the themes in The Grapes of Wrath by enhancing the mood Steinbeck wants readers to feel at different points in the book. Overall, the intercalary chapters that Steinbeck includes improve his novel by making it more memorable and reinforcing the themes Steinbeck embraces throughout the novel. Exemplary stylistic devices further persuade readers of John Steinbeck’s personal beliefs. Steinbeck wrote The Grapes of Wrath to bring to light cruelties against migrants, and by using literary devices effectively, he continuously reminds readers of his purpose. Steinbeck’s impressive language choices in his intercalary chapters advance the entire novel and help to create a classic work of literature that people still are able to relate to today. 

This essay sticks pretty closely to the standard analytical essay outline. It starts with an introduction, where I chose to use a quote to start off the essay. (This became my favorite way to start essays in high school because, if I wasn’t sure what to say, I could outsource the work and find a quote that related to what I’d be writing about.) The quote in this essay doesn’t relate to the themes I’m discussing quite as much as it could, but it’s still a slightly different way to start an essay and can intrigue readers. I then give a bit of background on The Grapes of Wrath and its themes before ending the intro paragraph with my thesis: that Steinbeck used literary devices in intercalary chapters to show how rough migrants had it.

Each of my four body paragraphs is formatted in roughly the same way: an intro sentence that explains what I’ll be discussing, analysis of that main point, and at least two quotes from the book as evidence.

My conclusion restates my thesis, summarizes each of four points I discussed in my body paragraphs, and ends the essay by briefly discussing how Steinbeck’s writing helped introduce a world of readers to the injustices migrants experienced during the dust bowl.

What does this analytical essay example do well? For starters, it contains everything that a strong analytical essay should, and it makes that easy to find. The thesis clearly lays out what the essay will be about, the first sentence of each of the body paragraph introduces the topic it’ll cover, and the conclusion neatly recaps all the main points. Within each of the body paragraphs, there’s analysis along with multiple excerpts from the book in order to add legitimacy to my points.

Additionally, the essay does a good job of taking an in-depth look at the issue introduced in the thesis. Four ways Steinbeck used literary devices are discussed, and for each of the examples are given and analysis is provided so readers can understand why Steinbeck included those devices and how they helped shaped how readers viewed migrants and their plight.

Where could this essay be improved? I believe the weakest body paragraph is the third one, the one that discusses how Steinbeck used plain, grammatically incorrect language to both accurately depict the migrants and make them more relatable to readers. The paragraph tries to touch on both of those reasons and ends up being somewhat unfocused as a result. It would have been better for it to focus on just one of those reasons (likely how it made the migrants more relatable) in order to be clearer and more effective. It’s a good example of how adding more ideas to an essay often doesn’t make it better if they don’t work with the rest of what you’re writing. This essay also could explain the excerpts that are included more and how they relate to the points being made. Sometimes they’re just dropped in the essay with the expectation that the readers will make the connection between the example and the analysis. This is perhaps especially true in the second body paragraph, the one that discusses similarities to Biblical passages. Additional analysis of the quotes would have strengthened it.

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Summary: How to Write an Analytical Essay

What is an analytical essay? A critical analytical essay analyzes a topic, often a text or film. The analysis paper uses evidence to support the argument, such as excerpts from the piece of writing. All analytical papers include a thesis, analysis of the topic, and evidence to support that analysis.

When developing an analytical essay outline and writing your essay, follow these five steps:

Reading analytical essay examples can also give you a better sense of how to structure your essay and what to include in it.

What's Next?

Learning about different writing styles in school?  There are four main writing styles, and it's important to understand each of them. Learn about them in our guide to writing styles , complete with examples.

Writing a research paper for school but not sure what to write about?   Our guide to research paper topics has over 100 topics in ten categories so you can be sure to find the perfect topic for you. 

Literary devices can both be used to enhance your writing and communication. Check out this list of 31 literary devices to learn more !

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Body paragraphs: Moving from general to specific information

Your paper should be organized in a manner that moves from general to specific information. Every time you begin a new subject, think of an inverted pyramid - The broadest range of information sits at the top, and as the paragraph or paper progresses, the author becomes more and more focused on the argument ending with specific, detailed evidence supporting a claim. Lastly, the author explains how and why the information she has just provided connects to and supports her thesis (a brief wrap-up or warrant).

This image shows an inverted pyramid that contains the following text. At the wide top of the pyramid, the text reads general information introduction, topic sentence. Moving down the pyramid to the narrow point, the text reads focusing direction of paper, telling. Getting more specific, showing. Supporting details, data. Conclusions and brief wrap up, warrant.

Moving from General to Specific Information

The four elements of a good paragraph (TTEB)

A good paragraph should contain at least the following four elements: T ransition, T opic sentence, specific E vidence and analysis, and a B rief wrap-up sentence (also known as a warrant ) –TTEB!

  • A T ransition sentence leading in from a previous paragraph to assure smooth reading. This acts as a hand-off from one idea to the next.
  • A T opic sentence that tells the reader what you will be discussing in the paragraph.
  • Specific E vidence and analysis that supports one of your claims and that provides a deeper level of detail than your topic sentence.
  • A B rief wrap-up sentence that tells the reader how and why this information supports the paper’s thesis. The brief wrap-up is also known as the warrant. The warrant is important to your argument because it connects your reasoning and support to your thesis, and it shows that the information in the paragraph is related to your thesis and helps defend it.

Supporting evidence (induction and deduction)

Induction is the type of reasoning that moves from specific facts to a general conclusion. When you use induction in your paper, you will state your thesis (which is actually the conclusion you have come to after looking at all the facts) and then support your thesis with the facts. The following is an example of induction taken from Dorothy U. Seyler’s Understanding Argument :

There is the dead body of Smith. Smith was shot in his bedroom between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m., according to the coroner. Smith was shot with a .32 caliber pistol. The pistol left in the bedroom contains Jones’s fingerprints. Jones was seen, by a neighbor, entering the Smith home at around 11:00 p.m. the night of Smith’s death. A coworker heard Smith and Jones arguing in Smith’s office the morning of the day Smith died.

Conclusion: Jones killed Smith.

Here, then, is the example in bullet form:

  • Conclusion: Jones killed Smith
  • Support: Smith was shot by Jones’ gun, Jones was seen entering the scene of the crime, Jones and Smith argued earlier in the day Smith died.
  • Assumption: The facts are representative, not isolated incidents, and thus reveal a trend, justifying the conclusion drawn.

When you use deduction in an argument, you begin with general premises and move to a specific conclusion. There is a precise pattern you must use when you reason deductively. This pattern is called syllogistic reasoning (the syllogism). Syllogistic reasoning (deduction) is organized in three steps:

  • Major premise
  • Minor premise

In order for the syllogism (deduction) to work, you must accept that the relationship of the two premises lead, logically, to the conclusion. Here are two examples of deduction or syllogistic reasoning:

  • Major premise: All men are mortal.
  • Minor premise: Socrates is a man.
  • Conclusion: Socrates is mortal.
  • Major premise: People who perform with courage and clear purpose in a crisis are great leaders.
  • Minor premise: Lincoln was a person who performed with courage and a clear purpose in a crisis.
  • Conclusion: Lincoln was a great leader.

So in order for deduction to work in the example involving Socrates, you must agree that (1) all men are mortal (they all die); and (2) Socrates is a man. If you disagree with either of these premises, the conclusion is invalid. The example using Socrates isn’t so difficult to validate. But when you move into more murky water (when you use terms such as courage , clear purpose , and great ), the connections get tenuous.

For example, some historians might argue that Lincoln didn’t really shine until a few years into the Civil War, after many Union losses to Southern leaders such as Robert E. Lee.

The following is a clear example of deduction gone awry:

  • Major premise: All dogs make good pets.
  • Minor premise: Doogle is a dog.
  • Conclusion: Doogle will make a good pet.

If you don’t agree that all dogs make good pets, then the conclusion that Doogle will make a good pet is invalid.

When a premise in a syllogism is missing, the syllogism becomes an enthymeme. Enthymemes can be very effective in argument, but they can also be unethical and lead to invalid conclusions. Authors often use enthymemes to persuade audiences. The following is an example of an enthymeme:

If you have a plasma TV, you are not poor.

The first part of the enthymeme (If you have a plasma TV) is the stated premise. The second part of the statement (you are not poor) is the conclusion. Therefore, the unstated premise is “Only rich people have plasma TVs.” The enthymeme above leads us to an invalid conclusion (people who own plasma TVs are not poor) because there are plenty of people who own plasma TVs who are poor. Let’s look at this enthymeme in a syllogistic structure:

  • Major premise: People who own plasma TVs are rich (unstated above).
  • Minor premise: You own a plasma TV.
  • Conclusion: You are not poor.

To help you understand how induction and deduction can work together to form a solid argument, you may want to look at the United States Declaration of Independence. The first section of the Declaration contains a series of syllogisms, while the middle section is an inductive list of examples. The final section brings the first and second sections together in a compelling conclusion.

How to Write an Analytical Essay – Easy-to-Follow Guide

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How to Write an Analytical Essay

This article provides a comprehensive guide on how to write an analytical essay, offering insights into crafting a compelling essay. It covers the fundamentals of the writing process, from choosing a topic to research techniques and structuring the essay effectively.

The guide offers actionable tips and empowering guidance for learning what is analytical essay. It serves as a stepping stone towards mastering the art of analysis, making it a valuable companion on the journey to articulate and persuasive writing.

Discover What Is Analytical Essay

Analytical essays are academic writing that deeply delve into a specific subject or issue, focusing on analyzing and interpreting information through evidence and supporting details. Critical characteristics of analytical writing include objective analysis, a thesis-driven nature, evidence-based reasoning, and critical thinking. These essays require facts, examples, and quotations to support the writer’s analysis.

Mastering analytical writing is crucial for academic success as it helps students develop strong analytical thinking skills, which are highly valued in educational settings. It also contributes to career advancement, as individuals who can analyze information effectively are better equipped for decision-making roles in various professions.

Effective communication is another critical aspect of analytical writing, as it fosters the ability to articulate complex ideas and arguments coherently. Problem-solving skills are also developed through analytical thinking, as individuals proficient in analytical thinking can approach challenges methodically and break down complex problems into manageable components. Research proficiency is also linked to the structure of analysis essay, as skilled individuals can navigate and synthesize vast amounts of information effectively.

Choosing a Topic for an Analytical Paper

The selection of a topic analysis essay is crucial. It involves prioritizing relevance, narrowing broad ideas, and establishing a solid thesis statement. It involves understanding and adhering to assignment criteria, aligning with personal interest, engaging the audience, and refining the chosen topic to make it more manageable.

Initial brainstorming is essential, as it helps to write analytical essay ideas related to the general subject. Breaking broad topics into specific subtopics allows for a more in-depth and manageable analysis. Considering the scope and depth of the chosen topic is also essential, as it allows for a comprehensive analysis within the given word limit or time constraints.

In conclusion, knowing how to write an analytical essay topic involves prioritizing relevance, narrowing down broad ideas, and establishing a solid thesis statement. By adhering to assignment criteria, personal interest, and practical topic refinement, writers can set the foundation for a focused, engaging, and analytically robust essay.

Research and Gathering Evidence

To effectively gather and organize evidence, follow these tips:

  • Structured Note-Taking: Create a structured outline or use digital tools to organize your notes systematically.
  • Summarize Key Points: Capture the essence of each source by summarizing key points, including supporting evidence, examples, and counterarguments. Attribute information clearly to its source during note-taking to facilitate proper citation later.
  • Organize by Theme or Argument: Organize your notes based on themes or arguments to provide clarity and identify patterns, trends, and connections crucial for your essay’s structure.
  • Incorporating Quotes: Choose quotes that directly support your thesis statement, strengthen your argument, and contribute to the overall coherence of your essay.
  • Proper Citation: Ensure accurate and consistent citation according to the required style (e.g., APA, MLA).
  • Introducing and Explaining Quotes: Introduce quotes effectively and explain their significance, blending them into your narrative. Avoid overreliance on quotes; balance your original analysis while ensuring your original analysis remains the driving force of your essay.
  • Paraphrasing and Synthesizing: Practice paraphrasing and synthesizing information from sources to maintain a cohesive and original analytical narrative.

By following these strategies, you can confidently embark on your analytical paper journey, knowing that the art of analysis lies in the information presented and how you synthesize and interpret it.

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Creating an Analytical Essay Outline

An analytical paper should follow a structured outline, starting with an introduction with a hook, background information, thesis statement, body paragraphs, evidence, analysis, transition, and anticipation of counterarguments. The introduction should include background information, a hook, evidence, analysis, and transition.

Counter arguments should be acknowledged and refuted, and the conclusion should summarize the central argument or analysis for essay. Key points discussed in each paragraph should be briefly recapped, and final thoughts should offer reflections or suggestions for further exploration. A list of sources should be provided, following the appropriate citation style.

This analytical essay outline may be adjusted based on the assignment’s requirements or preferred writing style. Each Roman numeral represents a significant section of the essay, while the letters represent subpoints within those sections.

How to Write an Analytical Essay Introduction

An analytical essay introduction is crucial for establishing a connection with the reader and setting the stage for the subsequent analysis. To create a captivating introduction, do the following:

  • Start with an engaging anecdote or quote related to your topic.
  • Start with shocking statistics or intriguing facts to capture attention and create urgency.
  • Pose a rhetorical question to stimulate curiosity and create an interactive dimension to your introduction.
  • If applicable, share a brief personal experience related to the topic to humanize the essay and provide a relatable entry point for the reader.

The thesis statement is the roadmap that guides the reader through the analytical landscape of your analytical argumentative essay, encapsulating the main argument, stance, and direction. Ensure that your statement is concise and specific, as ambiguity can diminish the impact of your analytical stance. Align the thesis with the chosen topic, previewing the analytical exploration that awaits. Communicate that the thesis serves as the framework for your analysis, with every subsequent paragraph and argument contributing to supporting or challenging the central thesis.

Remember that the thesis might evolve as you delve deeper into the research and writing process. Encourage writers to revisit and refine the thesis to ensure it remains aligned with the developing understanding of the topic. By emphasizing its pivotal role, writers set the stage for cohesive and purposeful analytical papers.

Structure of Analysis Essay Body

The body paragraphs of a critical analytical essay are crucial for guiding readers through the analysis presented. They serve as a preview, providing a clear and concise roadmap for the essay’s content. Topic sentences should be clear, direct, and aligned with the thesis, and engaging language should be used to establish unity and coherence.

The heart of the analytical essay lies in the depth of analysis applied to the presented evidence. Writers should thoroughly examine each piece of evidence, examining its layers to extract nuanced insights contributing to the overall argument. Every analysis should tie back to the thesis statement, and there should be a clear link between the evidence presented, the analysis conducted, and the overarching argument.

Exploring how to write analytical essay projects from multiple perspectives adds depth and complexity to the essay. Balancing evidence and analysis is essential, as too much without insightful interpretation can make the essay seem superficial, while excessive analysis without supporting evidence weakens the argument.

Transitions between paragraphs are essential for binding paragraphs together and maintaining reader engagement. They should facilitate a logical progression of ideas from one paragraph to the next, using transitional words and phrases to signal shifts in thought and guide the reader through the evolving analysis. Transitions help maintain focus, prevent abrupt shifts, and reinforce the central thesis.

By knowing how to write an analytical essay topic sentence, providing an in-depth analysis of evidence and smoothly transitioning between paragraphs, writers can elevate the overall quality of their analytical essays, transforming the essay’s body into a cohesive, persuasive, and intellectually satisfying exploration of the chosen topic.

Analytical Essay Conclusion

A conclusion is crucial for any writing, as it provides closure, summarizes key points, and leaves a lasting impression on the reader. Here are some tips for writing an effective conclusion to an analytical essay:

  • Summarize critical points: Start by summarizing the main points discussed in your essay and revisiting them to reinforce their significance.
  • Restate the thesis statement: Bring the focus back to the thesis statement to emphasize the core message of your writing.
  • Provide a synthesis: Offer a synthesis of the information presented, connecting the dots between different ideas or arguments to demonstrate how they collectively contribute to the overarching theme or message.
  • Share insights or implications: Share any insights or broader implications of your analysis and discuss their significance in the broader context or field of study.
  • Connect to the introduction: Create a sense of cohesion by connecting your conclusion to the introduction and referencing a theme, anecdote, or idea introduced in the opening.
  • End with a clincher: Conclude your essay with a memorable statement or clincher that leaves a lasting impression on the reader.
  • Avoid introducing new information: Your conclusion should be a summary and reflection of what has already been discussed in the essay’s body.
  • Consider the tone: Match the tone of your conclusion to the overall tone of your essay, whether academic or personal.

And finally, keep it concise. A well-crafted conclusion is succinct yet impactful.

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The Ultimate Guide to Analytical Essay Writing: How to Craft an A-Grade Paper?

25 January, 2021

17 minutes read

Author:  Kate Smith

An analytical essay is often considered the most challenging piece of writing. However, those who have dealt with it at least once are a step closer to calling themselves masters of essay writing. This type of paper requires plenty of analytical skills to carry out an in-depth analysis of the assigned topic. Yet, the main goal of an analytical essay is not only to demonstrate your ability to learn the basics of the theme.

Analytical Essay

You also need to think critically, analyze facts, express your standpoint, and clearly show a deep understanding of key concepts. In short, your main task as an author is to prove the validity of your views by coming up with strong arguments that do not beg any questions.

how to write an analytical essay

The given guide provides a full analytical essay definition, as well as specifies its features and structural aspects. The following information will help you properly start your paper, choose a relevant topic, and come up with compelling conclusions. 

What is an Analytical Essay?

An analytical essay is a piece of writing aimed to provide a thorough analysis of a definite phenomenon using persuasive arguments and supporting assertions. Analysis in the analytical essay writing process stands for a method of research that allows one to study specific features of an object. Analytical papers also have to do with analysis of a specific problem; that is consideration of the problem itself and identification of its key patterns. The subject matter of analysis can be a well-known or little-studied scientific phenomenon, artistic work, historical event, social problem, etc.

The content of an analytical essay will totally depend on the object that has been chosen for analysis. Thus, when shedding light on any kind of scientific work, an analytical essay can be devoted to the analysis of research credibility, its relevance, or the adequacy of conclusions. When considering a work of art, an essay writer can focus on the analysis of the author’s artistic techniques or issues raised in the book. For this reason, it is essential to accurately determine the topic and subject matter of your future analytical essay.

Steps to Take Before Writing

The preparational stage of analytical essay writing cannot be omitted. It lays the basis for the A-grade paper and should be carefully completed. If you don’t know how to start an analytical essay, read a few handy tips that will ensure a solid foundation for your paper.  

Define a subject matter

You first need to clearly understand the issue you will base your essay on. Since analytical essays imply an in-depth analysis of a specific problem, you need to define its core. Try to split the analysis into several components and provide arguments taken either from a book, a research, a scientific work, or a movie (depending on the subject matter of your analysis), and support your views comprehensively.

Decide on the content of your analytical essay

If you are a student who was given an analytical essay topic, read the task several times before you are 100% sure that you clearly understand the requirements as to the analytical essay format. In case you were lucky to choose the topic of the analytical paper by yourself, make sure the theme you will be dealing with is familiar or at least seems interesting to you. 

Remember that different subject matters require a different approach to their analysis. If you examine some literature work, you can prove your opinion based on the deeds of a certain or several characters. But if you have been assigned the task to elaborate on some historic events, analyze their main causes, driving forces that have affected their course, and their global consequences.  

Take care of the proper start

Don’t forget to start your analytical essay with a thesis statement. It is a sentence or a couple of sentences that aim to summarize the key statements of your paper. A thesis statement should provide readers with a preliminary idea of what your essay is all about.  

Find extra reasoning

Make sure your thesis is supported by compelling arguments. To find enough evidence, you should carry out a thorough analysis of the assigned topic. List the crucial points of your research and ponder over the ways they can be used to prove your final opinion. 

Elaborate the outline

A sound outline elaborated at the preparation stage will help you ensure a proper analytical essay structure and make the overall writing process easier. As a rule, an analytical essay consists of an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Your outline plan should include the key arguments you want to discuss in each paragraph. 

Analytical Essay Thesis

A thesis statement represents the central idea of your paper and must serve as strong proof of your standpoint. While elaborating your thesis statement, it is crucial to include it at the end of the first paragraph and thus set a direction for the overall paper. 

Analytical Essay Outline

An outline is not a required element of analytical essays writing and should not be included in the text, but it can greatly facilitate the whole process of paper writing.

The analytical essay structure looks as follows:

Introduction

In the introduction of an analytical essay, you will need to identify your paper’s subject matter. Mention the purpose of your work and specify its scope of research. Don’t forget to include a thesis to let readers know what your work is about.

Body Section

As has already been mentioned, the body section covers three or more main paragraphs, each being supported with arguments and details. Besides, you need to provide a small conclusion to each statement to make your essay sound professional and persuasive. 

At this stage, you need to summarize the points elucidated in your paper and make sure there is a smooth and logical transition from the body section to the concluding part of the text. If you don’t know how to conclude an analytical essay, try to restate the thesis statement without copying it word for word.  

Analytical Essay Examples

Writing an analytical essay may seem to be a thorny way. If you are still not sure how to properly craft one, try to find some examples that will help you go in the right direction. Below, there are some great examples of analytical essays. Take a look at their structure and try to write something similar based on your views and ideas:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JeR4i4RIZIj448W3KVFyHP-eS3QPN7gW/view

https://stlcc.edu/docs/student-support/academic-support/college-writing-center/rhetorical-analysis-sample-essay.pdf

https://www.germanna.eduhttp://handmadewriting.com/wp-content/uploads/tutoring/handouts/Literary-Analysis-Sample-Paper.pdf

30 Analytical Essay Topics

If you were allowed to choose the theme for your paper by yourself, check on the following analytical essay topics. Each of them can bring you the highest score:

General topics

  • The influence of social networks on the life of teens
  • Are salaries of football players too high?
  • Wearing uniforms in schools should be banned
  • A person in society: the problems of loneliness and privacy
  • Sociology of corporate relationships
  • Does the observation of space need more investments?
  • Should the voting age in the UK be decreased?
  • Reasons why capital punishment should be brought back in the UK
  • A world with no rules: a new human era or a road to the global collapse?
  • Life without technologies: will modern people survive?
  • Should scientists test drugs on animals to fight cancer?
  • The problem of keeping the balance between career and family life
  • The importance of listening to your body 
  • Problems caused by the lack of communication
  • Food addiction and the problems it causes
  • Problems of vaccination in the XXI century
  • Does evil really rule the world?
  • How does body size affect life quality?
  • Pros and cons of video games 
  • The role of a family model in the life and career of a person

Analytical Essay Topics on Literature

  • “Robinson Crusoe”: fantasy vs reality
  • Observation of the artistic uniqueness in the comedy by W. Shakespeare “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” 
  • Observe the social problems in the novel by John Steinbeck “The Grapes of Wrath”
  • Convulsions and death of the “little man” in the networks of impersonal, alienated forces in the novel “The Metamorphosis”
  • Observation of the problems of a man on a plagued land in the novel “The Plague”
  • Revolt of the protagonist in the novel by J. Salinger “The Catcher in the Rye”
  • Observation of friendship and love in the fate of humanity in the XX century
  • The triumph of immorality in the novel by F. Sagan “Hello Sadness”
  • Observation of the personality of an American student in the novel by J. Salinger “The Catcher in the Rye”
  • Eternal tragedies of humanity in the tragedy by W. Shakespeare “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”

How to Write a Well-Structured Analytical Essay With a Solid Argument

Writing an analytical essay with a clear structure might be challenging unless you are thoroughly prepared. We decided to help you out and create a detailed guide listing the main things to consider when creating an analytical essay outline. You need to explain your main idea in a concise way to bring your point across. As analytical writing has high requirements, it pays off to find an analytical essay example and analyze how this text was written. It will allow you to understand the analytical essay format better and learn how to provide substantive analysis on various topics. Read on to learn how to write a top-level analytical paper and submit it on time.

Main Tips for Writing an Analytical Essay

An analytical essay should provide a comprehensive analysis of a chosen topic. What makes an analysis essay different from other assignments is that it includes a personal opinion of an author. This is why analytical writing should be persuasive.

Below, we have rounded up the key tips you need to follow when producing an analytical essay outline and the main body of your text. Read on to learn more about the analytical essay format and create a text that will fully meet the requirements.

Select an Analytical Essay Topic

Before creating an analytical essay outline, make sure to pick a topic that you are interested in. It should be provocative enough to engage your readers. A widely-debated topic will help you write an analytical essay that grabs the attention of a wide audience.

Consider your goals and conduct thorough research to see if you have enough sources to support the main thesis of your analysis essay.

Come Up With a Strong Analytical Thesis Statement

When writing an analytical essay, start by formulating a thesis statement that includes the topic and the main goal of your text. It will help you create an analytical essay outline and show your readers what you will discuss in your analysis essay.

Add it to the last paragraph of your analytical essay introduction. Due to this, your analytical essay outline will look better structured. Look at any analytical essay example to see how you can introduce your subject. In most cases, one sentence will suffice to state your analysis essay’s goal. However, a complex analytical essay outline might require you to use two sentences for a thesis statement.

Write an Analytical Essay Body with a Clear Structure

Your analytical essay outline should include 3-4 paragraphs. However, a literary analysis essay usually consists of 5 paragraphs. When it comes to analytical writing, it is important to cover a different point in each section of the main body of an analysis paper.

After writing an analytical essay, check whether each paragraph contains an introduction and the main point. Besides, it should contain evidence. An expertly written analytical essay outline will help you reach out to your target audience more effectively.

Conduct Research Before Writing an Analytical Essay Outline

While this step is preparatory, it is a must for those who want to write a well-grounded analytical paper.

  • First, select the best ideas for your essay
  • Then, emphasize the problems with works written by other researchers
  • Finally, write your analytical essay outline to demonstrate what approach you want to take

Examine the context and find examples to illustrate the scope of the issue. You may draw parallels to emphasize your point and make your topic more relatable.

Analyze the Implications of the Evidence

After listing your pieces of evidence and demonstrating how it is related to your thesis, show why it is important. You need to explore it deeply and use it to support your argument. It will make your analytical essay outline well-grounded facts.

Write an Analytical Essay Conclusion

Whether you write a literary analysis essay or other types of assignments, there is no need to add any new data at the end of your analysis paper. Instead, summarize the arguments you mentioned in your analytical essay outline. The conclusion of your analysis essay should be short and clear. Here, you need to demonstrate that you have achieved your goals.

Analytical Essay Writing Tips

If you want to get the highest grade for your analytical essay, you need to know a little bit more than just the basics of paper writing. Read these handy tips to write a perfect essay you will be proud of:

  • Double-check your paper for spelling and grammar mistakes. In case your essay contains too many errors, neither an in-depth analysis nor the elaborate writing style will make it look any better. Situations when essays of great value in terms of research and a message they convey are poorly assessed because of the abundance of mistakes are not rare. Make sure you have enough time to proofread your paper before submission. Also, you may consider asking somebody to take a fresh look at your essay and check it for you.
  • Reading your analytical essay out loud helps you discover all types of errors or weak phrases. This method might seem a bit uncomfortable, but it has proved to be very effective for many students. Note that silent reading of your paper isn’t even half as helpful as reading it aloud. 
  • Another great idea to check on the rhythm and flow of your paper is to ask someone to read it for you. While listening to the text, you could perceive it from another perspective and discover even more inconsistencies and mistakes.  
  • Double-check the facts you use in your analytical essay. The names of people, books, research, publications, as well as dates of historical events are too important to be misspelled. Things like these show your professionalism and the way you treat your readers.

Write an Analytical Essay with HandmadeWriting

Writing an analytical essay requires time, strong writing skills, great attention to detail, and a huge interest in the assigned topic. However, life can be unpredictable sometimes, and students might find themselves at risk of failing their creative assignments. Stress, family issues, poor health, and even unwillingness to work on a certain topic may become significant obstacles on their way to the A-grade work.

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Analytical Essay Guide

Analytical Essay Outline

Nova A.

Analytical Essay Outline - An Easy Guide

Published on: Mar 7, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 29, 2023

analytical essay outline

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Are you feeling lost when it comes to writing an analytical essay and don't know how to structure the data? 

Many students find it challenging to craft well-structured, insightful analysis essays. The process can seem daunting, from dissecting a text or concept to effectively organizing your thoughts. 

Don't worry; we've got your back! 

In our blog, we've put together some easy-to-follow templates and examples that will help you make a perfect analytical essay outline. No more staring at a blank page! With our tips and examples, you'll have a clear roadmap for your essay. 

So, let's dive in!

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Analytical Essay Overview

An analytical essay is a type of academic writing that examines a topic, idea, or piece of literature in-depth. It involves breaking down the subject into its components, analyzing them, and presenting a well-structured argument or interpretation. 

The goal of an analytical essay is to explore the "how" and "why" of the subject rather than just describing it. Unlike an argumentative essay , an analytical does not include persuasion of the writer’s claim. It often requires evidence, critical thinking, and careful evaluation to support your thesis and provide insights. 

This essay type is commonly assigned in literature, history, and other academic disciplines to assess your ability to think critically and articulate your ideas clearly.

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How To Write An Analytical Essay Outline?

Like every other academic writing, an analytical essay requires an organized structure for its content to be readable and understandable. In order to shape all the raw information, an outline is drafted.

An analytical essay outline is similar to the traditional  essay outline  of five paragraphs. According to this five-paragraph format, the essay is divided into the following sections:

  • Introduction
  • Body Paragraph 1
  • Body Paragraph 2
  • Body paragraph 3
  • Conclusion 

The researched information about the specific topic needs to be organized. This is to make sure that the content is clear and effective for the readers. 

analytical essay outline info

Read on to get a better idea of each section.

Analytical Essay Introduction

The importance and significance of the introduction of an essay can not be denied. An analytical essay introduction is the first section of the essay. In this part, the topic and author are introduced to the readers. 

The purpose of writing an  essay introduction  is to attract the readers to the topic. Also, motivate them to read the essay. The introduction lays the whole groundwork for your essay. So the more substantial the introduction, the more effective the paper is going to be.

The analytical essay introduction is based on two main elements:

  • Thesis statement 

Just as the name suggests, a writer uses a hook statement to “hook” the audience to read further. A hook statement is an opening sentence of the introductory paragraph. It is a very important sentence as it grabs the reader’s attention towards the topic and the essay. 

A hook can be a sentence of any type. It can be humorous as well as factual. Depending on the essay topic, a writer can choose any form of an opening sentence. However, it goes with the theme and the topic of the essay. 

For example,

Looking for more hook statements? Read our “ hook examples ” blog and get hundreds of hook examples to get inspired!

Thesis Statement

Following the hook comes the most critical element of an essay - the thesis statement. A thesis statement is the writer’s stance or argument on the chosen work. This is where the writer states and highlights the main argument of the essay topic. 

The thesis statement can be written by keeping in mind the original text’s goal and the writer’s analysis. 

When using a 5 paragraph format, a writer must provide a short supporting statement with the thesis statement. It is to show that the writer is going to back up the thesis. 

Analytical Essay Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs of an essay support your claim by providing shreds of evidence. All the gathered and relevant information that justifies the argument is presented in this section.

The body section of an analytical essay should be divided into different paragraphs. The writer should discuss each point in a specific paragraph. It will make your essay logical and readable for the audience.

All of the paragraphs in the body section have four components to be covered:

  • Topic Sentence -  A  topic sentence  is an opening sentence of a paragraph. This sentence is the claim or the important point that proves the thesis statement. Begin each of your paragraphs with a topic sentence. 
  • Supporting Material -  The supporting material will back the claim and will provide detailed, researched information for your thesis statement. After writing a topic sentence, give evidence to prove it correct.
  • Connection -  In order to tie your claim and evidence together, use a piece to follow the evidence. When using a quote or a phrase, make sure that you have stated its purpose or importance first.
  • Transition -  After you have proved your claim, it is time to move on to the next paragraph or the claim. All the paragraphs in your essay must be connected and maintain a logical flow.

Each paragraph should be transitioned to make logical content. This transition will act as a bridge and will connect the previous paragraph with the next paragraph.

Analytical Essay Conclusion

The  essay conclusion  is the last section where all the discussion comes to an end. Here the writer restates the thesis statement and provides a short summary of the major points in the content. It will prove that the main argument is justified using the evidence for the readers.

For example, 

Analytical Essay Format

When it comes to formatting your analytical essay, adhering to specific guidelines is essential to ensure a professional presentation and clarity for your readers. Here are some key formatting guidelines to follow:

  • Page Setup: Use standard letter-sized (8.5" x 11") paper with 1-inch margins on all sides.
  • Font: Select a legible font, such as Times New Roman or Arial, and maintain consistency throughout the document.
  • Font Size: Use a 12-point font size for the main text to ensure readability.
  • Spacing: Double-space the entire essay, including the title, headings, and references.
  • Title Page: Include a title page with the essay title, your name, course, instructor's name, and date. This information is typically centered and formatted according to your institution's guidelines.

By adhering to these formatting guidelines, you'll present your work professionally, making it easier for readers to engage with your analysis.

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Analytical Essay Example

An analytical essay is a little different than other types of essay . Therefore, to write a good analytical essay, students require essay examples to know what to produce and how to produce it. 

We have gathered some free analytical essay outline samples for you to take assistance for your next assignment. 

Analytical Essay Structure Sample

Critical Analytical Essay Outline Template

Literary Analytical Essay Outline

Macbeth Analytical Essay

Analytical Essay Outline Worksheet

Need more analytical essay samples? Check out our “ analytical essay examples ” blog and get more ideas!

Tips to Structure an Analytical Essay

Here are some essential tips to help you create a well-organized and effective analytical essay:

  • Choose a Clear Analytical Essay Topic: Select a specific topic or idea to analyze. Make sure it's something you can dissect and discuss thoroughly. If you are looking for ideas read our blog on analytical essay topics to get inspiration.
  • Begin with an Analytical Essay Outline: Start with a clear outline to organize your thoughts. Use an analytical essay outline example or sample as a template.
  • Introduction with a Strong Thesis: Your introduction should introduce the topic and contain a strong thesis statement that lays out your argument.
  • Body Paragraphs for Evidence: Dedicate individual paragraphs to supporting evidence and arguments. Use the analytical essay structure to create a logical flow.
  • Cite Sources Properly: If you're using references, ensure you follow the analytical essay format and cite sources correctly.
  • Analyze and Interpret: Dive deep into your analysis, providing insights and interpretations.
  • Conclusion with Restated Thesis: Summarize your main points and restate the thesis in the conclusion.
  • Edit and Proofread: Review and edit your essay for clarity and coherence.

By following these tips and employing an analytical argument essay outline, you'll structure your essay for maximum impact.

In summary, we've covered the ins and outs of creating an analytical essay outline in our guide. With this, you should feel more confident in structuring your essays effectively. Remember, a well-structured outline is your dependable guide for successful essay writing, so create one wisely!

If you're searching to pay someone to write my essay , MyPerfectWords.com is the answer. We provide free samples and essay writing help to guide you for all your academic assignments. 

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Simply hire our  analytical essay writing service  to get help from a qualified and experienced analytical essay writer.

Nova A. (Literature, Marketing)

Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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How to Write a Rhetorical Analysis | Key Concepts & Examples

Published on August 28, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

A rhetorical analysis is a type of essay  that looks at a text in terms of rhetoric. This means it is less concerned with what the author is saying than with how they say it: their goals, techniques, and appeals to the audience.

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Table of contents

Key concepts in rhetoric, analyzing the text, introducing your rhetorical analysis, the body: doing the analysis, concluding a rhetorical analysis, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about rhetorical analysis.

Rhetoric, the art of effective speaking and writing, is a subject that trains you to look at texts, arguments and speeches in terms of how they are designed to persuade the audience. This section introduces a few of the key concepts of this field.

Appeals: Logos, ethos, pathos

Appeals are how the author convinces their audience. Three central appeals are discussed in rhetoric, established by the philosopher Aristotle and sometimes called the rhetorical triangle: logos, ethos, and pathos.

Logos , or the logical appeal, refers to the use of reasoned argument to persuade. This is the dominant approach in academic writing , where arguments are built up using reasoning and evidence.

Ethos , or the ethical appeal, involves the author presenting themselves as an authority on their subject. For example, someone making a moral argument might highlight their own morally admirable behavior; someone speaking about a technical subject might present themselves as an expert by mentioning their qualifications.

Pathos , or the pathetic appeal, evokes the audience’s emotions. This might involve speaking in a passionate way, employing vivid imagery, or trying to provoke anger, sympathy, or any other emotional response in the audience.

These three appeals are all treated as integral parts of rhetoric, and a given author may combine all three of them to convince their audience.

Text and context

In rhetoric, a text is not necessarily a piece of writing (though it may be this). A text is whatever piece of communication you are analyzing. This could be, for example, a speech, an advertisement, or a satirical image.

In these cases, your analysis would focus on more than just language—you might look at visual or sonic elements of the text too.

The context is everything surrounding the text: Who is the author (or speaker, designer, etc.)? Who is their (intended or actual) audience? When and where was the text produced, and for what purpose?

Looking at the context can help to inform your rhetorical analysis. For example, Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech has universal power, but the context of the civil rights movement is an important part of understanding why.

Claims, supports, and warrants

A piece of rhetoric is always making some sort of argument, whether it’s a very clearly defined and logical one (e.g. in a philosophy essay) or one that the reader has to infer (e.g. in a satirical article). These arguments are built up with claims, supports, and warrants.

A claim is the fact or idea the author wants to convince the reader of. An argument might center on a single claim, or be built up out of many. Claims are usually explicitly stated, but they may also just be implied in some kinds of text.

The author uses supports to back up each claim they make. These might range from hard evidence to emotional appeals—anything that is used to convince the reader to accept a claim.

The warrant is the logic or assumption that connects a support with a claim. Outside of quite formal argumentation, the warrant is often unstated—the author assumes their audience will understand the connection without it. But that doesn’t mean you can’t still explore the implicit warrant in these cases.

For example, look at the following statement:

We can see a claim and a support here, but the warrant is implicit. Here, the warrant is the assumption that more likeable candidates would have inspired greater turnout. We might be more or less convinced by the argument depending on whether we think this is a fair assumption.

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Rhetorical analysis isn’t a matter of choosing concepts in advance and applying them to a text. Instead, it starts with looking at the text in detail and asking the appropriate questions about how it works:

  • What is the author’s purpose?
  • Do they focus closely on their key claims, or do they discuss various topics?
  • What tone do they take—angry or sympathetic? Personal or authoritative? Formal or informal?
  • Who seems to be the intended audience? Is this audience likely to be successfully reached and convinced?
  • What kinds of evidence are presented?

By asking these questions, you’ll discover the various rhetorical devices the text uses. Don’t feel that you have to cram in every rhetorical term you know—focus on those that are most important to the text.

The following sections show how to write the different parts of a rhetorical analysis.

Like all essays, a rhetorical analysis begins with an introduction . The introduction tells readers what text you’ll be discussing, provides relevant background information, and presents your thesis statement .

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how an introduction works.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech is widely regarded as one of the most important pieces of oratory in American history. Delivered in 1963 to thousands of civil rights activists outside the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., the speech has come to symbolize the spirit of the civil rights movement and even to function as a major part of the American national myth. This rhetorical analysis argues that King’s assumption of the prophetic voice, amplified by the historic size of his audience, creates a powerful sense of ethos that has retained its inspirational power over the years.

The body of your rhetorical analysis is where you’ll tackle the text directly. It’s often divided into three paragraphs, although it may be more in a longer essay.

Each paragraph should focus on a different element of the text, and they should all contribute to your overall argument for your thesis statement.

Hover over the example to explore how a typical body paragraph is constructed.

King’s speech is infused with prophetic language throughout. Even before the famous “dream” part of the speech, King’s language consistently strikes a prophetic tone. He refers to the Lincoln Memorial as a “hallowed spot” and speaks of rising “from the dark and desolate valley of segregation” to “make justice a reality for all of God’s children.” The assumption of this prophetic voice constitutes the text’s strongest ethical appeal; after linking himself with political figures like Lincoln and the Founding Fathers, King’s ethos adopts a distinctly religious tone, recalling Biblical prophets and preachers of change from across history. This adds significant force to his words; standing before an audience of hundreds of thousands, he states not just what the future should be, but what it will be: “The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.” This warning is almost apocalyptic in tone, though it concludes with the positive image of the “bright day of justice.” The power of King’s rhetoric thus stems not only from the pathos of his vision of a brighter future, but from the ethos of the prophetic voice he adopts in expressing this vision.

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See an example

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

The conclusion of a rhetorical analysis wraps up the essay by restating the main argument and showing how it has been developed by your analysis. It may also try to link the text, and your analysis of it, with broader concerns.

Explore the example below to get a sense of the conclusion.

It is clear from this analysis that the effectiveness of King’s rhetoric stems less from the pathetic appeal of his utopian “dream” than it does from the ethos he carefully constructs to give force to his statements. By framing contemporary upheavals as part of a prophecy whose fulfillment will result in the better future he imagines, King ensures not only the effectiveness of his words in the moment but their continuing resonance today. Even if we have not yet achieved King’s dream, we cannot deny the role his words played in setting us on the path toward it.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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The goal of a rhetorical analysis is to explain the effect a piece of writing or oratory has on its audience, how successful it is, and the devices and appeals it uses to achieve its goals.

Unlike a standard argumentative essay , it’s less about taking a position on the arguments presented, and more about exploring how they are constructed.

The term “text” in a rhetorical analysis essay refers to whatever object you’re analyzing. It’s frequently a piece of writing or a speech, but it doesn’t have to be. For example, you could also treat an advertisement or political cartoon as a text.

Logos appeals to the audience’s reason, building up logical arguments . Ethos appeals to the speaker’s status or authority, making the audience more likely to trust them. Pathos appeals to the emotions, trying to make the audience feel angry or sympathetic, for example.

Collectively, these three appeals are sometimes called the rhetorical triangle . They are central to rhetorical analysis , though a piece of rhetoric might not necessarily use all of them.

In rhetorical analysis , a claim is something the author wants the audience to believe. A support is the evidence or appeal they use to convince the reader to believe the claim. A warrant is the (often implicit) assumption that links the support with the claim.

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How to Write an Analytical Essay: A Complete Guide & Examples [UPD 2024]

Analytical Essay aim.

Have an analytical essay to write? Not an easy assignment. We are ready to provide you with several insights on how to write a successful paper. If you have a school or a college assignment, this article is just for you. Continue reading it, and you’ll find out:

  • What is an analytical essay?
  • Secrets of a perfect analytical essay.
  • What is a literary essay?
  • A piece of practice: A Literary analysis essay example and an analytical essay example.
  • 📝 Analytical Essay: Definition
  • 🖊️ How to Write an Analysis?

🔢 Analytical Essay Topics

  • 💡 Analytical Essay Example
  • 📚 Literary Analysis Essay
  • 📓 5 General Tips

📝 What Is an Analytical Essay?

You can write an analytical essay on any topic. It could be politics, art, economics, music, etc. The goal of analytical writing is to analyze the issue. Before writing such an essay, writers review the topic. They study the question from different points of view. Then, they express their opinion in the paper.

Components of an Analytical Essay

🖊️ how to write an analysis 3 key steps, 1. pick a good analysis essay topic.

Choosing an excellent analytical essay topic isn’t an easy task. We are here to offer you several working strategies:

  • Study your subject. Before analyzing any topic, it is helpful to study it. You need to become a real expert on the subject. Then you will realize that analysis is easy.
  • Try to find examples of similar essay topics. It would be great to find sample essays on similar topics. Use websites of different schools and libraries. They can help you to understand the structure of your work better. They can give you inspiration about the ideas you might discuss in your work.
  • Don’t keep silent. If you need any help – ask for it. Teachers are happy to answer the questions of interested students. You could discuss problematic points with your classmates. They might have similar problems, and group thinking could be a big deal of help.

2. Develop an Analytical Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is the main idea of your work. You can express it in one sentence and support it with arguments.

An analytical essay statement’s goal is to answer two key questions:

  • How does something do what it does?
  • Why is it as it is?

A working thesis statement helps the readers with the structure of your paper. It provides them with the central point of your work. They also get to know the main arguments supporting the idea. It declares a position about the subject that needs discussing and proving.

Sometimes you generalize your thesis statement. Try to use more specific words and ideas. To answer a how or why question, use such words as “by” or “because.”

3. Create an Analysis Essay Outline

Any written assignment needs thorough planning. Analytical essays are no exception. Before starting your writing, make a well-structured outline of your work. The outline should include every paragraph’s essential points.

An analysis essay consists of three parts. They are an introduction, main body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Let’s look into these parts in more detail.

The picture contains a list of an outline's elements.

Analysis Essay Introduction

The goal of the introduction is to catch the readers’ attention. To bring this focus to your subject, you need to start with a hook. The hook can be in the form of a rhetorical or provocative question. It can look like a quotation or a bold statement. A good introduction includes the question you will discuss. Apart from that, it states the position you are taking. Background information on the topic is in the intro too.

Analysis Essay Main Body

The main body is an essential part of an essay. Its goal is to provide the reader with the central idea’s development. In this section, you need to support your thesis with evidence. Usually, this part consists of at least three paragraphs. The number of paragraphs depends on how broad the thesis statement is. Writers take the evidence from different textual resources. It may be a summary, a direct quotation, or even a paraphrase.

Don’t forget about topic sentences at the beginning of each paragraph! It should contain the main idea of the paragraph. It is essential to express its connection to your work’s central position.

It is vital to support everything you claim in the thesis statement. That is why you need to have a narrow thesis statement. The broader your thesis is – the more paragraphs the main body will contain.

Analysis Essay Conclusion

The concluding paragraph aims to give your paper a sense of completeness. Its purpose is to mark the end of your work. It is vital to stick to your point in the conclusion. Do not introduce any new topics or ideas. The goal here is to restate the thesis. You need to summarize the central issues you have discussed. An ideal conclusion reminds the reader of how you proved your argument. It leaves some space for an open discussion.

In this section, you’ll find 40 analytical essay topics for various study levels and fields. Each link leads to a page with an essay sample that you can use for inspiration.

  • 2010 midterm Senate elections analysis
  • Post traumatic stress disorder analysis
  • Alibaba Company’s external analysis
  • Folklore genres and analysis
  • Allied Cooperative Insurance Group: financial analysis
  • Amazon INC.’s strategic analysis report
  • Analysis of a sample of spoken and written discourse
  • “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost: critical analysis
  • Analysis of factors impact on organizational management
  • Analysis of finance, internal competitive resources, and strategy
  • Business and corporate law: analysis of three cases
  • “Should a Woman Work Outside the Home?” analysis
  • Porter’s Five Forces: strategy analysis in airline industry
  • Analysis of Enterprise Web Services security model
  • Analysis of inaugural speeches
  • Hamlet: character analysis
  • Electoral College system analysis
  • Analysis of Kate Chopin’s “The Story Of An Hour”
  • Analysis of Penfold Company
  • Analysis of “The World is Flat” by Thomas Friedman
  • The Dodd-Frank Act: federal policy analysis
  • Analysis of the Riordan Manufacturing System
  • Benihana Tokyo: the company analysis
  • Marxist anthropology: analysis and critique
  • Internet financial reporting analysis
  • Novels Renaissance analysis
  • Child poverty in Canada problem analysis
  • Childhood obesity issue analysis
  • Analysis of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”
  • Chronic disease: diabetes analysis
  • The analysis of Wallada’s poetry
  • Coca-Cola: company analysis
  • Theory of planned behavior analysis
  • Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost
  • Cultural assessment models analysis
  • Canonization of the Bible analysis
  • “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin analysis
  • Health system reform analysis in Canada
  • Nintendo – strategic analysis
  • “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald: plot analysis

💡 Writing an Analytical Essay: A Wonderful Example

📚 literary analysis essay: example & guide, what is a literary analysis essay.

When writing a literary essay, we analyze literature. Sometimes you need to analyze only a particular character. Or you will talk about one aspect of the work. When you study literary work elements, you’ll understand the piece of literature better.

Literary Analysis Essay Components

Literary analysis essay: how does it look like.

A literary analysis is not a summary of writing. On the contrary, it is a debate about the work. It conveys a writer’s analysis of the work. It should include analysis and assessment of the piece of writing. To accomplish this goal, writers use different literary devices. The idea of literary analysis is to discuss writers’ thoughts.

Literary Analysis Essay Example

📓 5 general tips to get your analytical writing done, don’t neglect the outline before you start writing.

You need to organize your thoughts and ideas. It will help you remember the order of the essay components. Also, it will prompt the main ideas that the author has to mention.

Check Your Thesis Statement

The thesis statement is the stem of your paper. You need to discuss it further and support it with evidence. Before writing the main body, make sure that your statement is clear. It is essential to make your thesis statement assertive. In this case, the readers will understand your perspective. They will also believe what you are saying.

Review the Paper’s Structure

When you have done the first rough draft, revise the structure of your literary analysis. First, you need to check your thesis statement’s position. Don’t forget to check the arguments. Secondly, review the use of sentence structures, try to use a variety of different constructions. It is vital that you use the third-person perspective in the essay. Remember to include reliable sources.

Don’t Forget about Transitions

Literary analysis essays consist of several paragraphs. Different paragraphs discuss different ideas. So it is crucial to make the transitions between the sections smooth. Try not to jump from one fact to another. Use logical connectors instead. The essay should be coherent, with one idea following the previous one.

Use Academic Language

When discussing a work of literature, it is essential to remember your work’s style. Try to avoid informal style, slang, and jargon words. Use your dictionary or online resources if you need help with word choice. Remember that you are writing an academic paper. Academic papers require appropriate vocabulary.

Now you know all the excellent tips for writing an analytical essay. Why wait? Start writing your own paper! We wish you good luck!

🔗 References

  • Elements of Analysis – Purdue University
  • Guide to Writing an Analytical Essay – Stetson University
  • How to Write a Literary Analysis Essay – Bucks.edu
  • Writing an Analytical Essay – Utoronto.ca
  • Organizing Your Analysis – Purdue University
  • Analysis versus Description – Monash University
  • Analytical Thesis Statements – University of Arizona
  • Literary Analysis Sample Paper – Germanna Community College
  • Styles of Writing – University of Reading
  • Example Essays – University of Sussex
  • Using Evidence: Analysis – Walden University
  • Structuring the Essay – Monash University
  • How Can I Create Stronger Analysis? – University of Michigan
  • Thesis Statements – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

How to Write a Body Paragraph for a College Essay  

January 29, 2024

how to write a body paragraph college essay

No matter the discipline, college success requires mastering several academic basics, including the body paragraph. This article will provide tips on drafting and editing a strong body paragraph before examining several body paragraph examples. Before we look at how to start a body paragraph and how to write a body paragraph for a college essay (or other writing assignment), let’s define what exactly a body paragraph is.

What is a Body Paragraph?

Simply put, a body paragraph consists of everything in an academic essay that does not constitute the introduction and conclusion. It makes up everything in between. In a five-paragraph, thesis-style essay (which most high schoolers encounter before heading off to college), there are three body paragraphs. Longer essays with more complex arguments will include many more body paragraphs.

We might correlate body paragraphs with bodily appendages—say, a leg. Both operate in a somewhat isolated way to perform specific operations, yet are integral to creating a cohesive, functioning whole. A leg helps the body sit, walk, and run. Like legs, body paragraphs work to move an essay along, by leading the reader through several convincing ideas. Together, these ideas, sometimes called topics, or points, work to prove an overall argument, called the essay’s thesis.

If you compared an essay on Kant’s theory of beauty to an essay on migratory birds, you’d notice that the body paragraphs differ drastically. However, on closer inspection, you’d probably find that they included many of the same key components. Most body paragraphs will include specific, detailed evidence, an analysis of the evidence, a conclusion drawn by the author, and several tie-ins to the larger ideas at play. They’ll also include transitions and citations leading the reader to source material. We’ll go into more detail on these components soon. First, let’s see if you’ve organized your essay so that you’ll know how to start a body paragraph.

How to Start a Body Paragraph

It can be tempting to start writing your college essay as soon as you sit down at your desk. The sooner begun, the sooner done, right? I’d recommend resisting that itch. Instead, pull up a blank document on your screen and make an outline. There are numerous reasons to make an outline, and most involve helping you stay on track. This is especially true of longer college papers, like the 60+ page dissertation some seniors are required to write. Even with regular writing assignments with a page count between 4-10, an outline will help you visualize your argumentation strategy. Moreover, it will help you order your key points and their relevant evidence from most to least convincing. This in turn will determine the order of your body paragraphs.

The most convincing sequence of body paragraphs will depend entirely on your paper’s subject.  Let’s say you’re writing about Penelope’s success in outwitting male counterparts in The Odyssey . You may want to begin with Penelope’s weaving, the most obvious way in which Penelope dupes her suitors. You can end with Penelope’s ingenious way of outsmarting her own husband. Because this evidence is more ambiguous it will require a more nuanced analysis. Thus, it’ll work best as your final body paragraph, after readers have already been convinced of more digestible evidence. If in doubt, keep your body paragraph order chronological.

It can be worthwhile to consider your topic from multiple perspectives. You may decide to include a body paragraph that sets out to consider and refute an opposing point to your thesis. This type of body paragraph will often appear near the end of the essay. It works to erase any lingering doubts readers may have had, and requires strong rhetorical techniques.

How to Start a Body Paragraph, Continued

Once you’ve determined which key points will best support your argument and in what order, draft an introduction. This is a crucial step towards writing a body paragraph. First, it will set the tone for the rest of your paper. Second, it will require you to articulate your thesis statement in specific, concise wording. Highlight or bold your thesis statement, so you can refer back to it quickly. You should be looking at your thesis throughout the drafting of your body paragraphs.

Finally, make sure that your introduction indicates which key points you’ll be covering in your body paragraphs, and in what order. While this level of organization might seem like overkill, it will indicate to the reader that your entire paper is minutely thought-out. It will boost your reader’s confidence going in. They’ll feel reassured and open to your thought process if they can see that it follows a clear path.

Now that you have an essay outline and introduction, you’re ready to draft your body paragraphs.

How to Draft a Body Paragraph

At this point, you know your body paragraph topic, the key point you’re trying to make, and you’ve gathered your evidence. The next thing to do is write! The words highlighted in bold below comprise the main components that will make up your body paragraph. (You’ll notice in the body paragraph examples below that the order of these components is flexible.)

Start with a topic sentence . This will indicate the main point you plan to make that will work to support your overall thesis. Your topic sentence also alerts the reader to the change in topic from the last paragraph to the current one. In making this new topic known, you’ll want to create a transition from the last topic to this one.

Transitions appear in nearly every paragraph of a college essay, apart from the introduction. They create a link between disparate ideas. (For example, if your transition comes at the end of paragraph 4, you won’t need a second transition at the beginning of paragraph 5.) The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Writing Center has a page devoted to Developing Strategic Transitions . Likewise, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Writing Center offers help on paragraph transitions .

How to Draft a Body Paragraph for a College Essay ( Continued)

With the topic sentence written, you’ll need to prove your point through tangible evidence. This requires several sentences with various components. You’ll want to provide more context , going into greater detail to situate the reader within the topic. Next, you’ll provide evidence , often in the form of a quote, facts, or data, and supply a source citation . Citing your source is paramount. Sources indicate that your evidence is empirical and objective. It implies that your evidence is knowledge shared by others in the academic community. Sometimes you’ll want to provide multiple pieces of evidence, if the evidence is similar and can be grouped together.

After providing evidence, you must provide an interpretation and analysis of this evidence. In other words, use rhetorical techniques to paraphrase what your evidence seems to suggest. Break down the evidence further and explain and summarize it in new words. Don’t simply skip to your conclusion. Your evidence should never stand for itself. Why? Because your interpretation and analysis allow you to exhibit original, analytical, and critical thinking skills.

Depending on what evidence you’re using, you may repeat some of these components in the same body paragraph. This might look like: more context + further evidence + increased interpretation and analysis . All this will add up to proving and reaffirming your body paragraph’s main point . To do so, conclude your body paragraph by reformulating your thesis statement in light of the information you’ve given. I recommend comparing your original thesis statement to your paragraph’s concluding statement. Do they align? Does your body paragraph create a sound connection to the overall academic argument? If not, you’ll need to fix this issue when you edit your body paragraph.

How to Edit a Body Paragraph

As you go over each body paragraph of your college essay, keep this short checklist in mind.

  • Consistency in your argument: If your key points don’t add up to a cogent argument, you’ll need to identify where the inconsistency lies. Often it lies in interpretation and analysis. You may need to improve the way you articulate this component. Try to think like a lawyer: how can you use this evidence to your advantage? If that doesn’t work, you may need to find new evidence. As a last resort, amend your thesis statement.
  • Language-level persuasion. Use a broad vocabulary. Vary your sentence structure. Don’t repeat the same words too often, which can induce mental fatigue in the reader. I suggest keeping an online dictionary open on your browser. I find Merriam-Webster user-friendly, since it allows you to toggle between definitions and synonyms. It also includes up-to-date example sentences. Also, don’t forget the power of rhetorical devices .
  • Does your writing flow naturally from one idea to the next, or are there jarring breaks? The editing stage is a great place to polish transitions and reinforce the structure as a whole.

Our first body paragraph example comes from the College Transitions article “ How to Write the AP Lang Argument Essay .” Here’s the prompt: Write an essay that argues your position on the value of striving for perfection.

Here’s the example thesis statement, taken from the introduction paragraph: “Striving for perfection can only lead us to shortchange ourselves. Instead, we should value learning, growth, and creativity and not worry whether we are first or fifth best.” Now let’s see how this writer builds an argument against perfection through one main point across two body paragraphs. (While this writer has split this idea into two paragraphs, one to address a problem and one to provide an alternative resolution, it could easily be combined into one paragraph.)

“Students often feel the need to be perfect in their classes, and this can cause students to struggle or stop making an effort in class. In elementary and middle school, for example, I was very nervous about public speaking. When I had to give a speech, my voice would shake, and I would turn very red. My teachers always told me “relax!” and I got Bs on Cs on my speeches. As a result, I put more pressure on myself to do well, spending extra time making my speeches perfect and rehearsing late at night at home. But this pressure only made me more nervous, and I started getting stomach aches before speaking in public.

“Once I got to high school, however, I started doing YouTube make-up tutorials with a friend. We made videos just for fun, and laughed when we made mistakes or said something silly. Only then, when I wasn’t striving to be perfect, did I get more comfortable with public speaking.”

Body Paragraph Example 1 Dissected

In this body paragraph example, the writer uses their personal experience as evidence against the value of striving for perfection. The writer sets up this example with a topic sentence that acts as a transition from the introduction. They also situate the reader in the classroom. The evidence takes the form of emotion and physical reactions to the pressure of public speaking (nervousness, shaking voice, blushing). Evidence also takes the form of poor results (mediocre grades). Rather than interpret the evidence from an analytical perspective, the writer produces more evidence to underline their point. (This method works fine for a narrative-style essay.) It’s clear that working harder to be perfect further increased the student’s nausea.

The writer proves their point in the second paragraph, through a counter-example. The main point is that improvement comes more naturally when the pressure is lifted; when amusement is possible and mistakes aren’t something to fear. This point ties back in with the thesis, that “we should value learning, growth, and creativity” over perfection.

This second body paragraph example comes from the College Transitions article “ How to Write the AP Lang Rhetorical Analysis Essay .” Here’s an abridged version of the prompt: Rosa Parks was an African American civil rights activist who was arrested in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Read the passage carefully. Write an essay that analyzes the rhetorical choices Obama makes to convey his message.

Here’s the example thesis statement, taken from the introduction paragraph: “Through the use of diction that portrays Parks as quiet and demure, long lists that emphasize the extent of her impacts, and Biblical references, Obama suggests that all of us are capable of achieving greater good, just as Parks did.” Now read the body paragraph example, below.

“To further illustrate Parks’ impact, Obama incorporates Biblical references that emphasize the importance of “that single moment on the bus” (lines 57-58). In lines 33-35, Obama explains that Parks and the other protestors are “driven by a solemn determination to affirm their God-given dignity” and he also compares their victory to the fall the “ancient walls of Jericho” (line 43). By including these Biblical references, Obama suggests that Parks’ action on the bus did more than correct personal or political wrongs; it also corrected moral and spiritual wrongs. Although Parks had no political power or fortune, she was able to restore a moral balance in our world.”

Body Paragraph Example 2 Dissected

The first sentence in this body paragraph example indicates that the topic is transitioning into biblical references as a means of motivating ordinary citizens. The evidence comes as quotes taken from Obama’s speech. One is a reference to God, and the other an allusion to a story from the bible. The subsequent interpretation and analysis demonstrate that Obama’s biblical references imply a deeper, moral and spiritual significance. The concluding sentence draws together the morality inherent in equal rights with Rosa Parks’ power to spark change. Through the words “no political power or fortune,” and “moral balance,” the writer ties the point proven in this body paragraph back to the thesis statement. Obama promises that “All of us” (no matter how small our influence) “are capable of achieving greater good”—a greater moral good.

What’s Next?

Before you body paragraphs come the start and, after your body paragraphs, the conclusion, of course! If you’ve found this article helpful, be sure to read up on how to start a college essay and how to end a college essay .

You may also find the following blogs to be of interest:

  • 6 Best Common App Essay Examples
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  • How to Write the Community Essay
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Kaylen Baker

With a BA in Literary Studies from Middlebury College, an MFA in Fiction from Columbia University, and a Master’s in Translation from Université Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis, Kaylen has been working with students on their writing for over five years. Previously, Kaylen taught a fiction course for high school students as part of Columbia Artists/Teachers, and served as an English Language Assistant for the French National Department of Education. Kaylen is an experienced writer/translator whose work has been featured in Los Angeles Review, Hybrid, San Francisco Bay Guardian, France Today, and Honolulu Weekly, among others.

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So much is at stake in writing a conclusion. This is, after all, your last chance to persuade your readers to your point of view, to impress yourself upon them as a writer and thinker. And the impression you create in your conclusion will shape the impression that stays with your readers after they've finished the essay.

The end of an essay should therefore convey a sense of completeness and closure as well as a sense of the lingering possibilities of the topic, its larger meaning, its implications: the final paragraph should close the discussion without closing it off.

To establish a sense of closure, you might do one or more of the following:

  • Conclude by linking the last paragraph to the first, perhaps by reiterating a word or phrase you used at the beginning.
  • Conclude with a sentence composed mainly of one-syllable words. Simple language can help create an effect of understated drama.
  • Conclude with a sentence that's compound or parallel in structure; such sentences can establish a sense of balance or order that may feel just right at the end of a complex discussion.

To close the discussion without closing it off, you might do one or more of the following:

  • Conclude with a quotation from or reference to a primary or secondary source, one that amplifies your main point or puts it in a different perspective. A quotation from, say, the novel or poem you're writing about can add texture and specificity to your discussion; a critic or scholar can help confirm or complicate your final point. For example, you might conclude an essay on the idea of home in James Joyce's short story collection,  Dubliners , with information about Joyce's own complex feelings towards Dublin, his home. Or you might end with a biographer's statement about Joyce's attitude toward Dublin, which could illuminate his characters' responses to the city. Just be cautious, especially about using secondary material: make sure that you get the last word.
  • Conclude by setting your discussion into a different, perhaps larger, context. For example, you might end an essay on nineteenth-century muckraking journalism by linking it to a current news magazine program like  60 Minutes .
  • Conclude by redefining one of the key terms of your argument. For example, an essay on Marx's treatment of the conflict between wage labor and capital might begin with Marx's claim that the "capitalist economy is . . . a gigantic enterprise of dehumanization "; the essay might end by suggesting that Marxist analysis is itself dehumanizing because it construes everything in economic -- rather than moral or ethical-- terms.
  • Conclude by considering the implications of your argument (or analysis or discussion). What does your argument imply, or involve, or suggest? For example, an essay on the novel  Ambiguous Adventure , by the Senegalese writer Cheikh Hamidou Kane, might open with the idea that the protagonist's development suggests Kane's belief in the need to integrate Western materialism and Sufi spirituality in modern Senegal. The conclusion might make the new but related point that the novel on the whole suggests that such an integration is (or isn't) possible.

Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay:

  • Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas.
  • Avoid phrases like "in conclusion," "to conclude," "in summary," and "to sum up." These phrases can be useful--even welcome--in oral presentations. But readers can see, by the tell-tale compression of the pages, when an essay is about to end. You'll irritate your audience if you belabor the obvious.
  • Resist the urge to apologize. If you've immersed yourself in your subject, you now know a good deal more about it than you can possibly include in a five- or ten- or 20-page essay. As a result, by the time you've finished writing, you may be having some doubts about what you've produced. (And if you haven't immersed yourself in your subject, you may be feeling even more doubtful about your essay as you approach the conclusion.) Repress those doubts. Don't undercut your authority by saying things like, "this is just one approach to the subject; there may be other, better approaches. . ."

Copyright 1998, Pat Bellanca, for the Writing Center at Harvard University

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how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  • Mastering the Art of Essay Writing in Canadian…

Mastering the Art of Essay Writing in Canadian Universities: Strategies for Success

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

Writing essays is an important skill needed to succeed academically in Canadian colleges. Any student who wants to get good grades needs to learn the art of essay writing. Colleges in Canada require writers to be good at research. They need to have good critical thinking capabilities. Above all, students must maintain high academic standards. You can improve your success in writing by understanding what universities in Canada require. Remember your skills develop one step at a time daily. Whenever you need help, do not hesitate to ask.

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

Understand the process of writing essays  

It is good to understand the structure required by universities in Canada. However, understanding the process to follow is critical. The entire process might seem difficult but get help whenever needed. The team of educators in Canadian universities will be more than willing to help.

They understand how to teach essay writing in a fun way to improve understanding rate. One of the ways to help you understand the process is to study. Use different resources to learn the processes. Once you get it right, the rest of the steps will flow smoothly. The process follows several important steps. 

Part of the essay writing process may involve seeking help from expert writers. There are several advantages to hiring experts to write your essays. They have deep experience and understand the processes. Expert writers know what Canadian universities expect in essay writing. It is easy to get an essay writing service Canada online. You just need to connect online and open the writer’s website. When you pay for an essay, you get a paper written according to guidelines. You rest with confidence knowing that you will submit your essay on time. You no longer worry about dealing with plagiarism issues because the paper is original.  

Understanding essay guidelines in Canadian universities  

Colleges in Canada require students to observe the highest academic standards. Educators expect that students will show a high level of skills. They must be good at research and critical thinking. The writers must show good analytical skills and understanding of the essay content. It is necessary to understand the college-specific requirements. The citation and formatting styles in one region could be different in another.  

Understanding the guidelines for your college and the expectations is important. The universities require students to be sensitive to culture. Lecturers expect to see a sense of inclusivity in their arguments. The colleges expect the text to be written in clear language. The texts should be free from errors. Canadian universities may require an interdisciplinary approach to writing . Upholding integrity is a critical aspect of writing in Canada.    

The pre-writing processes  

The pre-writing processes include several phases. In this phase, a student understands what they are needed to do.   They get the necessary information that ensures their essay flows smoothly. The processes may include the following.  

●       Understanding the question . Most colleges in Canada give students a question to think about. It is necessary to understand this question/prompt.

●       Brainstorming . This process helps you understand what type of topic you should choose. It allows you to know the sources to use.

●       Choosing sources . You cannot achieve the right essay quality if you use the wrong sources. If you choose the right topic, you will have no trouble choosing the right sources.

●       Doing research . The next step under the prewriting phase is research. Under this step, you consolidate all the points needed. Consolidate the evidence to help support the points.

●       Creating an outline . After research, take time to reorganize the facts and points. Drop information that does not look relevant to the essay. Use the points that remain to create an outline.

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

Understanding the essay structure  

Educators in Canadian schools take time to teach about writing structure. The understanding of different students differs in many ways. Due to these, educators have developed strategies about how to teach essay writing to weak students. They give them more opportunities to write. The educators help them understand the structure of writing. Success in writing essays in Canada requires a good understanding of structure. The following components are crucial in structure.  

Introduction  

The introduction provides a background for the essay. Laying background information allows the audience to understand what the text is about. This section is further divided into sections. The first section is the hook that aims to attract attention from readers. The writer includes a thesis statement. It introduces the main argument of the essay.

  The body discusses the substance of the essay. In Canada, the body of an essay is broken down into segments. The first part is the topic sentence that introduces the main argument. The next sentence provides examples that support the argument. Professors in Canada are very keen to look for supporting evidence. It is necessary to have a smooth transition between paragraphs. 

The conclusion  

The conclusion restates the thesis and provides an overview of the main points. Give the reader a point to think about to emphasize the importance of the arguments.  

Comparing different types of essays  

In Canada, students should be ready to deal with different types of essays. Lecturers do not focus on a single type of writing skill. As a strategy on how to teach essay writing, they assign students a wide range of essays. Once you receive the prompt or question, try and understand what type of essay you have been assigned.  

Descriptive essay . A descriptive paper uses an emotional language approach to discuss a subject. The paper evokes emotions by providing a distinct and immersive description of the subject.  

Persuasive writing . Persuasive writing is also referred to as argumentative text. The writer takes an approach that persuades the reader to agree with their point. They must use points that counter every argument the reader might have.  

Narrative writing . An essay that requires narrative writing offers a series of arguments that attract the reader. They understand the view of a writer and narrate that view.  

Comparing and contrasting . Comparison essays argue on a point and then discuss its contrasting side. Their goal is to argue or compare similarities and contrasts. By examining contrasts and similarities, a writer encourages critical thinking in readers.

  Important essay writing tips for students in Canadian universities  

●       Avoid getting late for submission . Late submissions may attract penalties. Some lecturers in Canada may deduct marks or cancel the paper.

●       Plan your time well . If you want to beat deadlines, manage time well and start early.

●       Avoid hard topics . Tough topics take time to complete and you could be late. It is harder to get points for such topics.

●       Know the reader . Know who will read your paper and write directly to them. Be sure to resonate with them.

●       Cite well . Use the right citation style and know how to cite.

●       Refine your paper . Paper refinement includes several things. It includes reading the first and second time. Check errors with grammar tools and use plagiarism tools. Do formatting correctly by ensuring you use the right fonts. Follow the rules of spacing, paragraphs, and structure flow.  

To sum it up  

Universities in Canada follow strict writing guidelines. The educators expect students to focus on quality and originality. Strategies for essay writing success include taking time to understand the prompt. Know the initial writing processes such as picking a topic, researching, and creating an outline. Understand the structure to follow when writing. Write the submission date in your calendar to make sure you don’t miss it. Ensure you follow the detailed guidelines given by the university.

how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

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IMAGES

  1. How to Write Strong Essay Body Paragraphs

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  2. Analytical Essay: Body paragraph definition

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  3. How to Write a Body Paragraph for Literary Analysis Essays (Full

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  4. Simple Ways to Write a Body Paragraph: 13 Steps (with Pictures)

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  5. How to write an Analytical Essay?

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

  6. Academic essay body paragraph

    how to write a body paragraph in an analytical essay

VIDEO

  1. Analytical Paragraph Writing

  2. Body paragraphs

  3. Essay body paragraph

  4. An example of writing a body paragraph

  5. Format of Analytical paragraph || analytical paragraph format || analytical paragraph

  6. Analytical paragraph writing

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write an Analytical Essay in 6 Steps

    1 Introduction 2 Body 3 Conclusion The introduction is where you present your thesis statement and prepare your reader for what follows. Because analytical essays focus on a single topic, the introduction should give all the background information and context necessary for the reader to understand the writer's argument.

  2. How to Write a Perfect Analytical Paragraph

    If you are looking up how to write an analytical paragraph, you are most likely writing an argumentative or analytical essay. Analytical essays are similar to other essays, such as descriptive essays, in that you have a central idea, organize supporting ideas into body paragraphs, and make conclusions.

  3. How to Write the Body of an Analysis Essay

    An effective final sentence in a body paragraph also helps to transition into the next paragraph by creating a bridge to the next topic sentence. The wrap-up sentence is like the conclusion of the overall essay in that it restates the topic sentence's idea in light of the analysis and evidence provided in the paragraph. References. Writer Bio.

  4. Body Paragraphs: How to Write Perfect Ones

    A body paragraph is any paragraph in the middle of an essay, paper, or article that comes after the introduction but before the conclusion. Generally, body paragraphs support the work's thesis and shed new light on the main topic, whether through empirical data, logical deduction, deliberate persuasion, or anecdotal evidence.

  5. How to Write a Literary Analysis Essay

    Step 1: Reading the text and identifying literary devices The first step is to carefully read the text (s) and take initial notes. As you read, pay attention to the things that are most intriguing, surprising, or even confusing in the writing—these are things you can dig into in your analysis.

  6. How to write an A+ Analysing Argument body paragraph (Language Analysis

    // timestamps:0:00 - Tip #1 (Always include topic and linking sentences)3:55 - Tip #2 (Discuss a variety of different techniques and intended effects)7:52 - ...

  7. How to Write an Analytical Essay (with Samples)

    For this, you need to employ an analytical essay outline that will serve as a roadmap from the beginning to crafting a compelling concluding paragraph. So, let's break down the essential steps required for a proper analytical essay outline template to ensure you leave a lasting impact on your audience. ‍Introduction‍. Hook. Background ...

  8. How to Write an Analytical Essay: 15 Steps (with Pictures)

    Write your body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should have 1) a topic sentence, 2) an analysis of some part of the text and 3) evidence from the text that supports your analysis and your thesis statement. A topic sentence tells the reader what the body paragraph will be about. The analysis of the text is where you make your argument.

  9. Anatomy of a Body Paragraph

    To write strong paragraphs, try to focus each paragraph on one main point—and begin a new paragraph when you are moving to a new point or example. A strong paragraph in an academic essay will usually include these three elements: A topic sentence. The topic sentence does double duty for a paragraph.

  10. 5 Steps to Write a Great Analytical Essay

    Begin each body paragraph with a sentence that sets up the main point you'll be discussing. Then you'll give some analysis on that point, backing it up with evidence to support your claim. Continue analyzing and giving evidence for your analysis until you're out of strong points for the topic.

  11. Body Paragraphs

    A good paragraph should contain at least the following four elements: T ransition, T opic sentence, specific E vidence and analysis, and a B rief wrap-up sentence (also known as a warrant) -TTEB! A T ransition sentence leading in from a previous paragraph to assure smooth reading. This acts as a hand-off from one idea to the next.

  12. How to Write a Strong Body Paragraph for an Essay

    Writing How to Write a Strong Body Paragraph for an Essay Written by MasterClass Last updated: Jun 7, 2021 • 2 min read From magazines to academic essays, you can find body paragraphs across many forms of writing. Learn more about how to write engaging body paragraphs that support the central idea of your writing project.

  13. How to Write Analytical Essay: Simple Writing Steps to Follow

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on how to write an analytical essay, offering insights into crafting a compelling essay. It covers the fundamentals of the writing process, from choosing a topic to research techniques and structuring the essay effectively. ... Structure of Analysis Essay Body. The body paragraphs of a critical ...

  14. How to Write an Analytical Essay

    An analytical essay is a piece of writing aimed to provide a thorough analysis of a definite phenomenon using persuasive arguments and supporting assertions. Analysis in the analytical essay writing process stands for a method of research that allows one to study specific features of an object.

  15. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    Asking Analytical Questions When you write an essay for a course you are taking, you are being asked not only to create a product (the essay) but, more importantly, to go through a process of thinking ... The Anatomy of a Body Paragraph When you write strong, clear paragraphs, you are guiding your readers through your

  16. PDF Body Paragraph Analysis

    Once affably curious, after his departure from the Houyhnhnms Gulliver loses touch with natural human feelings, values, and priorities. His wife welcomes him home with love, patience and, forbearance, taking him "in her Analysis - The burden on the author to analyze is lightened significantly by the way in which he introduces his evidence.

  17. How to Write the Body of an Essay

    The body is always divided into paragraphs. You can work through the body in three main stages: Create an outline of what you want to say and in what order. Write a first draft to get your main ideas down on paper. Write a second draft to clarify your arguments and make sure everything fits together.

  18. Analytical Essay Outline

    Tips to Structure an Analytical Essay Analytical Essay Overview An analytical essay is a type of academic writing that examines a topic, idea, or piece of literature in-depth. It involves breaking down the subject into its components, analyzing them, and presenting a well-structured argument or interpretation.

  19. How to Write a Rhetorical Analysis

    A rhetorical analysis is a type of essay that looks at a text in terms of rhetoric. This means it is less concerned with what the author is saying than with how they say it: their goals, techniques, and appeals to the audience. A rhetorical analysis is structured similarly to other essays: an introduction presenting the thesis, a body analyzing ...

  20. How to Write an Analytical Essay: A Complete Guide & Examples

    Looking for an analytical essay's perfect guide? ⭐ It is the right place to learn more about writing an analytical essay, how to create an analysis essay outline 📝, & an analytical thesis statement! ... Main body: Paragraph 1: In the article, the author describes a particular scenario. It is a pattern of doing house chores with her husband.

  21. How to Write a Body Paragraph for a College Essay

    This second body paragraph example comes from the College Transitions article "How to Write the AP Lang Rhetorical Analysis Essay." Here's an abridged version of the prompt: Rosa Parks was an African American civil rights activist who was arrested in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama.

  22. How to Write an Analytical Essay for QCAA English

    #1: Context Statement Here you should include the main message of the work, as well as its date, writer, and historical context. Think of it as your 'History' paragraph. If certain aspects of the historical context are extremely significant for the exploration of your thesis statement, its great to mention them here in the first 3-4 lines.

  23. How To Write An Analytical Essay: Writing Guide With Examples

    Read on how to write a good analysis essay and get some perfect topics for analytical essay writing from the best authors skilled in analysis papers. ... There are some core requirements to a conclusion of an analytical essay. Once all the main body paragraphs are finished and logically built, you must finalize your analytical essay correctly. ...

  24. PDF Essays (page 1 of 2)

    Each body paragraph, like each room in a house, needs a structure, a clear focus, and supporting details or "decoration." A paragraph's structure often includes a topic sentence at the beginning of the paragraph. A topic sentence, like a thesis statement, can be written in the form of a grammatical sentence: the subject (or the paragraph ...

  25. Ending the Essay: Conclusions

    Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas. Avoid phrases like "in conclusion," "to conclude," "in summary," and "to sum up."

  26. Mastering the Art of Essay Writing in Canadian Universities: Strategies

    The writer includes a thesis statement. It introduces the main argument of the essay. The body The body discusses the substance of the essay. In Canada, the body of an essay is broken down into ...