3 Simple Guided Meditation Scripts for Improving Wellbeing

Guided meditation scripts

Even the most experienced meditators experience obstacles, such as excessive internal chatter, dozing off, or restlessness, on occasion. All meditators benefit from fresh guidance now and then.

This article describes the differences between guided and silent meditation, introduces three types of guided meditation scripts, and offers tips on how to offer guided meditation online.

Before you continue, we thought you might like to download our three Mindfulness Exercises for free . These science-based, comprehensive exercises will help you cultivate a sense of inner peace throughout your daily life and give you the tools to enhance the mindfulness of your clients, students, or employees.

This Article Contains:

What is guided meditation, how can guided meditation help your clients, 5 best guided meditation scripts, how-to guide for beginners: 5 ideas, a look at loving-kindness meditation, 5 telehealth tips for meditation through zoom, resources from positivepsychology.com, a take-home message.

Guided meditation involves a relationship between a teacher, who guides the meditation using oral instructions, and the student, who is listening to learn meditation (Suzuki, 1970).

Typically, guided meditation is necessary for beginners, but seasoned meditators may also benefit from refreshing their practice by relaxing into a guided session with a beginner’s mind (Suzuki, 1970).

Guided meditation vs silent meditation

Guided meditation can be very useful for keeping meditators on track during meditation.

Guided meditations can include oral instructions about meditation posture, attention to the breath, body scanning techniques , and guided imagery or visualization. They can also include reciting mantras, expressing aspirations aloud, or chanting. They may include specific types of movements or activities conducted in a meditative way.

Meanwhile, silent meditation is generally recommended for seasoned meditators who have internalized previous meditation instructions and can now practice the techniques above without guidance.

Silent meditation can be practiced in groups and alone; guided meditation is always offered in the context of a relationship, even if that relationship is with an app or online audio or video.

Guided Meditation

Mindfulness meditation has positive effects on health and wellbeing in several areas, including stress management (Davis & Hayes, 2012) and preventing relapse in those with depression and anxiety (Keng et al., 2011).

Other guided meditations such as loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and self-compassion meditation are effective methods of emotional regulation (Feliu-Soler et al., 2017) that can also enhance prosocial feelings (Bankard, 2015) and improve a sense of connectedness (Fredrickson et al., 2008).

LKM is effective at countering harsh inner criticism (Shahar et al., 2015) and high expectations of others (Feliu-Soler et al., 2017). It is also effective for those experiencing PTSD symptoms (Kearney et al., 2013) and loss of meaningful connection, such as the bereaved and those recovering from addictions (Graser & Stangier, 2018; Hofmann et al., 2011).

Guided kindness-based meditations in general, including loving-kindness and compassion meditation , enhance empathy, perspective taking, and self–other discrimination (Mascaro et al., 2015). These skills are crucial for maintaining and developing relationships of all kinds.

How can meditation ease anxiety?

Participants that completed an eight week guided mindfulness meditation course reported a reduction in some anxiety symptoms (Hoge et al., 2013). According to Blum et al. it could be a useful intervention in anxiety in adolescents (2019), and some research shows it can ease anxiety symptoms associated with depression (Edenfield & Saeed, 2012; Hofmann et al., 2010; Takahashi et al., 2019).

It can also alleviate the anxiety caused by stress (Corliss, 2014; Goyal et al., 2014; Ratanasiripong et al., 2015; Zeidan et al., 2014).

Below is a short 10-minute mindfulness meditation for anxiety that you can offer your clients. Additional short scripts are offered in the script section.

Other forms of guided meditation can soothe anxiety and provide a sense of containment by using mantras, visualization, and sound (Chen et al., 2012). For example, transcendental meditation (TM) uses Sanskrit mantra recitation, and a large body of research has documented TM’s success in alleviating mild-to-moderate anxiety (Orme-Johnson & Barnes, 2014).

Below is a 15-minute guided mantra-based meditation for anxiety by Deepak Chopra.

Can it induce relaxation and sleep?

Studies show that practising guided mindfulness meditation for eight weeks helped some participants relax and find relief from insomnia and other sleeping disorders (Neuendorf et al., 2015; Ong et al., 2014; Rusch et al., 2019), especially in older people (Perini et al., 2021).

Try this guided mindfulness meditation for relaxation and sleep offered by Mindful Peace.

Is guided meditation helpful for kids?

A recent systematic review of research conducted on the effects of guided mindfulness and affect-based meditations found that both types of guided meditation benefited kids (Filipe et al., 2021).

Mindfulness meditation improved cognitive and socio-emotional outcomes, whereas affect-based guided meditations like LKM improved social–emotional skills, including kindness, self-care, and perspective taking. Neither type of guided meditation impacted children’s academic outcomes.

You can read more about mindfulness for kids in our related article. Try playing this New Horizons 10-minute guided mindfulness meditation to your kids to see the results.

To share the benefits of guided meditation with your clients, try one of these meditation scripts in the links below.

1. Mindfulness of breathing meditations

Mindfulness meditation has a vast evidence base demonstrating its health benefits according to a recent meta-analysis of 55 years of research (Baminiwatta & Solangaarachchi, 2021).

Breath Awareness

Download our short, guided six-step mindfulness of the breath meditation.

Three Steps to Deep Breathing

Download our Three Steps to Deep Breathing meditation script.

Yogic Breathing

Access our Yogic Breathing mindfulness meditation script here.

2. Loving-kindness meditation

Below is a short script devised to deliver loving-kindness meditation in person and online. We suggest taking a three-second pause between each line if you use it with a client in a session. For an idea of pacing, play this guided 10-minute LKM video by Declutter the Mind.

Posture instructions:

Before beginning the practice, please find a comfortable posture that will help keep your spine straight, either seated or lying down, wherever is comfortable.

Next, notice where you place your hands. If seated, support them in your lap or by placing them gently palms down on your knees. If lying down, place them by your side in the yoga corpse pose .

Now, breathe naturally as we shall begin the meditation.

[bell/gong]

Practice script:

Imagine a dearly loved person sitting opposite you and that a white light connects you heart to heart. Connect with the feelings of affection and warmth you have for them.

Enjoy the feelings as they fill your body.

Next, slowly focus on the phrase, ‘May I be well, happy, and peaceful,’ feeling the warmth of loving-kindness filling your body…

And send these feelings to your friend. ‘May you be well, happy, and peaceful…’

Breathing naturally… As the light connects you, heart to heart.

‘May I be well, happy and peaceful…’

‘May you be well, happy, and peaceful…’

Feel yourselves bathed in the warmth and light of loving-kindness… while repeating these phrases, silently… ( mentally recite for two minutes).

Remember to breathe naturally, as the white light connects you both, heart to heart, and continue. ‘May I be well, happy, and peaceful… May you be well, happy, and peaceful…’

Next, remembering to breathe naturally, imagine the white light between you becoming a circle of light around you both.

The light is bathing you in the warmth and peace of loving-kindness that you radiate out to your surroundings…

Including all beings, from the smallest insect to the largest animal… and out into the universe.

See yourself and your friend radiating the light of loving-kindness out into infinity… ‘May we be well, happy, and peaceful. May all beings be well, happy, and peaceful…’

Breathing naturally, repeat these phrases, silently. ‘May we be well, happy. and peaceful… May all beings be well, happy, and peaceful…’ (mentally recite this for two minutes).

Now, enjoy the feelings of warmth and expansion in your body… Recognize the feelings that flow from your heart out into the universe… and the universal friendliness reflected in your own heart…

‘May we be well, happy, and peaceful. May all beings be well, happy, and peaceful…’ (mentally recite this for one minute).

As you continue to bathe in the warmth of loving-kindness… turn your attention to your body and notice your feelings and sensations… Notice ‘what’ is observing your body… and recognize that awareness… a peaceful, still part of you, that witnesses everything, without judgment…

Breathe naturally…

And slowly open your eyes.

3. Compassion meditation

This is a script devised for in-person and online delivery, starting with the same posture guidelines as the above LKM. In addition, it uses the same template based on the four Buddhist Brahma Viharas , which consist of loving-kindness, compassion, appreciative joy, and equanimity .

For an idea of how to pace this guided meditation, watch this 10-minute Growing Compassion Meditation by Dr. Elisha Goldstein.

Breathing naturally… Imagine a dear friend or loved one you know to be suffering right now, perhaps a sick family member or a friend with problems, and imagine a light at your heart that connects with the heart of your friend.

Breathing naturally, as the white light connects you, heart to heart, send compassion to them, saying, ‘May you be free of suffering and its causes…’

Feel yourselves bathed in the gentle light of compassion… while repeating these phrases, silently…

‘May I be free of suffering and its causes. May you be free of suffering and its causes…’ (recite mentally for two minutes)

Remember to breathe naturally, as the white light connects you both, heart to heart, and continue.

‘May I be free of suffering and its causes. May you be free of suffering and its causes…’

Next, remembering to breathe naturally, see the white light connecting your hearts becoming a circle of light around you both.

The light is bathing you in the gentle light of compassion that you radiate out to your surroundings…

See yourself and your friend radiating the light of compassion out into infinity… ‘May we be free of suffering and its causes. May all beings be free of suffering and its causes…’

Breathing naturally, repeat these phrases, silently. ‘May we be free of suffering and its causes. May all beings be free of suffering and its causes…’ (mentally recite this for two minutes).

Now, enjoy the soft gentle glow in your body… See compassion flowing from your heart out into the universe… and compassion reflected in your own heart…

‘May we be free of suffering and its causes. May all beings be free of suffering and its causes…’ (recite mentally for one minute).

As you continue to bathe in the soft glow of compassion… turn your attention to your body and notice your feelings and sensations… Notice the part of you that is observing your body… and recognize that awareness… a peaceful, still part of you, that witnesses everything, without judgment…

Meditation Postures

  • Familiarize yourself with meditation postures (Shah, 2020), typically lying down or sitting. It is important to keep the spine straight, the hands supported, and the body relaxed.
  • Ensure you know the practice yourself well before guiding others. Your degree of familiarity with the practice will be conveyed by the quiet confidence of your guidance.
  • Pace your guidance properly. Ensure your delivery gives your client enough time to digest and practice your instructions as they unfold without too much repetition or silence, as both can lead to drowsiness or restlessness depending on a client’s temperament. Open and close your meditation session after checking posture with a soft bell or gong.
  • Keep your tone of voice calm and measured. Some people are naturally endowed with a soothing voice, others can practice by recording themselves first.
  • Consider recording your guided meditation and practicing with your client together. This will give you more control initially and help you build confidence to guide your clients in person in the future. You can also share your client’s experience more directly if you practice together.

3 mindfulness exercises

Download 3 Free Mindfulness Exercises (PDF)

These detailed, science-based exercises will help you or your clients enjoy the benefits of mindfulness and create positive shifts in their mental, physical, and emotional health.

Download 3 Free Mindfulness Tools Pack (PDF)

By filling out your name and email address below.

LKM has roots in the ancient Buddhist practice of the Brahma Viharas (Frondsal, n.d.), also called the four immeasurables. Loving-kindness is the English translation of the Pali term metta, the first of the four practices.

The Buddha is said to have taught metta to the monks who were afraid of sprites (malevolent spirits) when meditating in the forest (Trafford, 2020). Their fear undermined their ability to concentrate and practice.

The Buddha taught that the cultivation of metta attracted the outward protection of the devas, or benevolent divinities (Access to Insight, 2013), who repel negative spirits that disturb and distract the mind, protecting an inward practice.

LKM has since developed into a popular guided meditation practice and become the subject of a growing body of scientific research. Some findings have supported the Buddha’s original claims about the power of metta to positively transform a meditator’s perceptions of reality (Vieten et al., 2018).

For further information on recent research and clinical applications, take a look at our dedicated Loving-Kindness Meditation article.

Zoom meditation

  • Ensure you can be fully viewed guiding and modeling a suitable meditation posture, rather than head and shoulders only. Try out the best position using your web camera or phone and the recording facility beforehand.
  • Ensure your surroundings are calm, well lit, and free of visual distractions. Wear appropriate clothing for meditation and yoga practice that is loose, roomy, and plain to prevent distractions.
  • Wear a Bluetooth wireless microphone clipped to your collar so that you can move freely without losing audio contact. Always ensure that you can be seen and heard properly before you begin.
  • After checking on posture, begin and end your guided meditation using a traditional bell or gong.
  • Ask for feedback about your videoconference session for ideas on how to improve the experience.

meditation speech

Top 17 Exercises for Mindfulness & Meditation

Use these 17 Mindfulness & Meditation Exercises [PDF] to help others build life-changing habits and enhance their wellbeing with the physical and psychological benefits of mindfulness.

Created by Experts. 100% Science-based.

Our site has many resources on mindfulness meditation based on the latest scientific research in the field, including this collection of 17 Mindfulness & Meditation Exercises for professionals.

Containing the highest rated tools taken from the Positive Psychology Toolkit© , the tools are rooted in science, drawn from the latest research and insights from the field of positive psychology, and include references, practical advice, and detailed descriptions of how to use them.

Interesting examples include the Cooking Mindfully exercise, which helps your clients develop mindfulness and savoring skills with cooking, eating, and beyond, as well as a selection of helpful audio scripts.

Another highly recommended resource is the Mindfulness X © bundle. It offers a complete eight-session training program in mindfulness-based interventions that include meditations and simple awareness exercises. It is the go-to tool if you are dedicated to improving the mindfulness of others.

Guided meditations of all kinds are rooted in ancient contemplative practices of increasing interest to researchers in the fields of medicine, psychology, and neuroscience.

Guided meditation includes a range of approaches, such as mindfulness, affect-based meditations like LKM, and mantra-based meditation like TM.

Short, guided meditations can provide useful support to clients between therapy and counseling sessions by helping them to manage stress, anxiety, sleeping problems, and difficult emotions.

We hope you enjoyed reading this article. Don’t forget to download our three Mindfulness Exercises for free .

  • Access to Insight. (2013, November 2) Karaniya Metta Sutta: The Buddha’s words on loving-kindness (Sn. 1.8) . Translated from the Pali by The Amaravati Sangha. Retrieved January 4, 2022, from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/snp/snp.1.08.amar.html
  • Baminiwatta, A., & Solangaarachchi, I. (2021). Trends and developments in mindfulness research over 55 years: A bibliometric analysis of publications indexed in Web of Science. Mindfulness 12 , 2099–2116.
  • Bankard, J. (2015). Training emotion cultivates morality: How loving-kindness meditation hones compassion and increases prosocial behavior. Journal of Religion and Health 54 (6), 2324–2343.
  • Blum, H., Rutt, C., Nash, C., Joyce, V., & Buonopane, R. (2019). Mindfulness meditation and anxiety in adolescents on an inpatient psychiatric unit. Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy , 27 (2), 65–83.
  • Chen, K. W., Berger, C. C., Manheimer, E., Forde, D., Magidson, J., Dachman, L., & Lejuez, C. W. (2012). Meditative therapies for reducing anxiety: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Depression and Anxiety,   29 (7), 545–562.
  • Corliss, J. (2014, January 8). Mindfulness meditation may ease anxiety, mental stress . Harvard Health Blog, Harvard Health Publishing. Retrieved January 4, 2022, from https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/mindfulness-meditation-may-ease-anxiety-mental-stress-201401086967
  • Davis, D. M., & Hayes, J. A. (2012). What are the benefits of mindfulness? Monitor on Psychology , 43 (7), 64.
  • Edenfield T. M., & Saeed, S. A., (2012). An update on mindfulness meditation as a self-help treatment for anxiety and depression. Psychology Research and Behavior Management , 5 , 131–141.
  • Feliu-Soler, A., Pascual, J. C., Elices, M., Martín-Blanco, A., Carmona, C., Cebolla, A., Simón, V., & Soler, J. (2017). Fostering self-compassion and loving-kindness in patients with borderline personality disorder: A randomized pilot study. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy , 24 , 278–286.
  • Filipe, M. G., Magalhães, S., Veloso, A. S., Costa, A. F., Ribeiro, L., Araújo, P., Castro, S. L., & Limpo, T. (2021). Exploring the effects of meditation techniques used by mindfulness-based programs on the cognitive, social-emotional, and academic skills of children: A systematic review. Frontiers in Psychology , 12 .
  • Fredrickson, B. L., Cohn, M. A., Coffey, K. A., Pek, J., & Finkel, S. M. (2008). Open hearts build lives: Positive emotions, induced through loving-kindness meditation, build consequential personal resources. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology ,  95 (5), 1045–1062.
  • Frondsal, G. (n.d.). The four faces of love: The Brahma Viharas. Insight Meditation Center. Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://www.insightmeditationcenter.org/books-articles/the-four-faces-of-love-the-brahma-viharas/
  • Goyal, M., Singh, S., Sibinga, E. M., Gould, N. F., Rowland-Seymour, A., Sharma, R., Berger, Z., Sleicher, D., Maron, D. D., Shihab, H. M., Ranasinghe, P. D., Linn, S., Saha, S., Bass, E. B., & Haythornthwaite, J. A. (2014). Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: A systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Internal Medicine , 174 (3), 357–368.
  • Graser, J., & Stangier, U. (2018). Compassion and loving-kindness meditation: An overview and prospects for the application in clinical samples. Harvard Review of Psychiatry , 26 (4), 201–215.
  • Hofmann, S. G., Sawyer, A. T., Witt A. A., & Oh, D. (2010). The effect of mindfulness-based therapy on anxiety and depression: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology , 78 (2), 169–183.
  • Hofmann, S. G., Grossman, P., & Hinton, D. E. (2011). Loving-kindness and compassion meditation: Potential for psychological interventions, Clinical Psychology Review , 31 (7), 1126–1132.
  • Hoge, E. A., Bui, E., Marques, L. Metcalf, C. A., Morris, L. K., Robinaugh, D. J., Worthington, J. J., Pollack, M. H., & Simon, N. M. (2013). Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for generalized anxiety disorder: Effects on anxiety and stress reactivity. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , 74 (8),786–792.
  • Kearney, D. J., Malte, C. A., McManus, C., Martinez, M. E., Felleman, B., & Simpson, T. L. (2013). Loving-kindness meditation for posttraumatic stress disorder: A pilot study. Journal of Traumatic Stress , 26 , 426–434.
  • Keng, S. L., Smoski, M. J., & Robins, C. J. (2011). Effects of mindfulness on psychological health: A review of empirical studies. Clinical Psychology Review , 31 (6), 1041–1056.
  • Mascaro, J. S., Darcher, A., Negi, L. T., & Raison, C. L. (2015). The neural mediators of kindness-based meditation: A theoretical model. Frontiers in Psychology 12 (6), 109.
  • Neuendorf, R., Wahbeh, H., Chamine, I., Yu, J., Hutchison, K., & Oken, B. S. (2015). The effects of mind-body interventions on sleep quality: A systematic review. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 902708.
  • Ong, J. C., Manber, R., Segal, Z., Xia, Y., Shapiro, S., & Wyatt, J. K. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for chronic insomnia, Sleep , 37 (9), 1553–1563.
  • Orme-Johnson, D. W., & Barnes, V. A. (2014). Effects of the transcendental meditation technique on trait anxiety: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine , 20 (5), 330–341.
  • Perini, F., Wong, K. F., Lin, J., Hassirim, Z., Ong, J. L., Lo, J., Ong, J. C., Doshi, K., & Lim, J. (2021). Mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia for older adults with sleep difficulties: A randomized clinical trial. Psychological Medicine , 1–11.
  • Ratanasiripong, P., Park, J. F., Ratanasiripong, N., & Kathalae, D. (2015). Stress and anxiety management in nursing students: Biofeedback and mindfulness meditation. Journal of Nurse Education , 54 (9), 520–524.
  • Rusch, H. L., Rosario, M., Levison, L. M., Olivera, A., Livingston, W. S., Wu, T., & Gill, J. M. (2019). The effect of mindfulness meditation on sleep quality: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences , 1445 (1), 5–16.
  • Shah, S. (2020). The 4 best meditation positions — and why your posture is important . Insider. Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://www.insider.com/best-posture-for-meditation
  • Shahar, B., Szepsenwol, O., Zilcha-Mano, S., Haim, N., Zamir, O., Levi-Yeshuvi, S., & Levit-Binnun, N. (2015). A wait-list randomized controlled trial of loving-kindness meditation programme for self-criticism. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy , 22 , 346–356.
  • Suzuki, S. (1970). Zen mind, beginner’s mind . Informal talks on Zen meditation and practice . Weatherhill.
  • Takahashi, T., Sugiyama, F., Kikai, T., Kawashima, I., Guan, S., Oguchi, M., Uchida, T., & Kumano, H. (2019). Changes in depression and anxiety through mindfulness group therapy in Japan: The role of mindfulness and self-compassion as possible mediators. BioPsychoSocial Medicine ,  13 , 4.
  • Trafford, P. (2020, April 12). Commentarial illumination on the Karaṇīya Mettā Sutta. Paul Trafford’s blog . Retrieved January 4, 2022, from https://paultrafford.blogspot.com/2020/04/commentarial-illumination-on-karaniya.html
  • Vieten, C., Wahbeh, H., Cahn, B. R., MacLean, K., Estrada, M., Mills, P., Murphy, M., Shapiro, S., Radin, D., Josipovic, Z., Presti, D. E., Sapiro, M., Bays, J. C., Russell, P., Vago, D., Travis, F., Walsh, R., & Delorme, A. (2018). Future directions in meditation research: Recommendations for expanding the field of contemplative science. PLoS One , 13 (11), e0205740.
  • Zeidan, F., Martucci, K. T., Kraft, R. A., McHaffie, J. G., & Coghill, R. C. (2014). Neural correlates of mindfulness meditation-related anxiety relief. Social, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience , 9(6), 751–759.

meditation speech

Share this article:

Article feedback

What our readers think.

Robert Iclef

This article will let me help people optimize their vision, where they can not see.

Jamie Perez-Galvan

Jo this was such an inspirational post! Really helped me understand the importance of mediation. Thank you!

Let us know your thoughts Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Related articles

Stress relief meditation

13 Ways Meditation Can Help You Relieve Stress (+ 3 Scripts)

Feeling stressed? Take a few moments to focus on your breath rising and falling while sitting comfortably with a straight back in a quiet place. [...]

Visualization Meditation

How to Practice Visualization Meditation: 3 Best Scripts

Visualization is a component of many meditation practices, including loving-kindness meditation (or metta) and the other three Brahma Viharas of compassion, appreciative joy, and equanimity [...]

Body scan meditation

How to Perform Body Scan Meditation: 3 Best Scripts

A body scan meditation is a specific form of mindfulness meditation that requires the practitioner to focus all of their attention on the body. The [...]

Read other articles by their category

  • Body & Brain (47)
  • Coaching & Application (56)
  • Compassion (26)
  • Counseling (51)
  • Emotional Intelligence (24)
  • Gratitude (18)
  • Grief & Bereavement (21)
  • Happiness & SWB (40)
  • Meaning & Values (26)
  • Meditation (20)
  • Mindfulness (45)
  • Motivation & Goals (45)
  • Optimism & Mindset (33)
  • Positive CBT (26)
  • Positive Communication (20)
  • Positive Education (46)
  • Positive Emotions (31)
  • Positive Leadership (16)
  • Positive Psychology (33)
  • Positive Workplace (35)
  • Productivity (16)
  • Relationships (46)
  • Resilience & Coping (34)
  • Self Awareness (20)
  • Self Esteem (37)
  • Strengths & Virtues (30)
  • Stress & Burnout Prevention (34)
  • Theory & Books (46)
  • Therapy Exercises (37)
  • Types of Therapy (64)

3 Mindfulness Exercises Pack (PDF)

Mindfulness Methods

The 5 Minute Mindfulness Meditation Script

The intention of the 5-minute meditation will help you relax and find inner peace. As you probably already know, there are many benefits to meditation, including reducing stress, alleviating negative emotions, reducing health reducing worries, and depression.

Mindfulness meditation helps you obtain a peaceful feeling within your physical body; and who doesn’t want that? The simple 5 minute mindfulness meditation improves focus and concentration, and increases self-awareness and increases your positive emotional response to daily living.

This meditation I have provided—actually two of them—is a simple one to practice, one that anyone can do, and it doesn’t require any special equipment or training.

These two meditation scripts are both great options for meditating in just five minutes, and are easy to add to your daily life and your daily meditation practice. You can use the one that best suits your fancy or use them both, as you build on your mindfulness meditation journey. 

Just find a comfortable spot, close your eyes, and follow along with either of the scripts. It can be done any time you need to slow down and relax and feel a sense of ease.

The health benefits and use of stress management through mindfulness exercises like meditation have been proven many times over. Using meditative relaxation techniques should be included in every person’s day.

It’s not only a great way to feel better and feel more aligned and stress free, but it aids in obtaining a healthy relationship with yourself and others that you interact with everyday.

You can use these guided meditations at home, in the office, or even while traveling for quick five minute meditation sessions. It’s a simple way to stay calm and deal with stressful situations, or when you just need some quiet time to yourself and want to feel peace and harmony.

You can use them as a morning meditation to strengthen your morning energy, or use them anytime during the day you want to work in a quick and short meditation.

Steps to meditate in 5 minutes:

Find a spot, your happy place, preferably in a quiet place to sit or lie down so your body is in a comfortable position. Sit with your shoulders up, thighs straight, stretched and grounded.

1) Close your eyes and inhale by taking a deep breath in through your nose feeling the air flow into your belly area. As you will feel your stomach rise, hold that breath for a 3 second pause, then exhale slowly through your mouth.

2) Repeat step 2 of inhaling through your nose and holding it and exhaling twice more.

3) As you let your breath out by exhaling for the third time, let go of all thoughts and feel them leaving your body.

3) Focus on your breathing and feel yourself relaxing.

4) Take a moment to direct all your undivided attention to your body and notice where you feel tension or discomfort.

5) Release any and all tension by making slow, easy movements like stretching your arms or rolling your neck around.

6) Continue breathing and relaxing until you feel calm and like you are ready to rejoin the world. Put your attention back on your breaths if at anytime your mind wanders.

7) Gently and softly open your eyes. Now you will feel yourself in a state of deep peace and harmony. Congratulations dear friend!

I wanted to add a bonus for you, so another option to get in a few minutes of meditation during the day is below.

Five Minute Guided Meditation Script for Relaxation and Tension Release

1) I’d like you to pause, take a deep breath and place your feet flat on the floor or ground. Really FEEL your feet in contact with the surface underneath you.

2) Now place your hands on your stomach and take 2-3 deep breaths, inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth, noticing your stomach rising and falling with each in and out breath. Take these breaths into the part of your lungs that are the stomach area instead of your upper chest.

3) When you feel comfortable, close your eyes.

4) Now, as you keep breathing deeply into your stomach, I’d like you to breathe in for a count of 5, then hold your breath for a count of 5, and breathe out slowly for a count of 5. And keep breathing, in for 5, hold for 5, out for 5. After that you should pause for about 1 minute.

5) Now I would like you to slowly bring your attention back to the room or area you’re at, noticing the sounds around you, and begin to open your eyes.

6) As you open your eyes notice how you are feeling. You should feel peace about yourself. This will help your whole day, and even promote more restful sleep. You can repeat this anytime during your day that you see fit from your vantage point.

*Important note: when you do this meditation let go of expectations and just relax your body and thinking.

This simple 5 minute guided meditation script helps revitalize and relax anyone who performs a mindful meditation.

Deep breathing helps to oxygenate your blood while the simple focus on the breath calms and brings you into the present moment, while creating a peaceful feeling through your whole body.

The benefits of meditation make it a very beneficial activity that can be practiced by anyone and is an integral part of mindfulness training. The 5 minute mindfulness meditation has many benefits for both the mind and body, including eliminating negative emotions, getting you into a relaxed state, and can be done anywhere and at almost any time you can find the right place.

It can also be a great starting point if you’ve not done meditating before, and with regular practice, it helps you acknowledge your inner thoughts, improves your thinking, reduces stress and anxiety levels, and promotes relaxation and reduces stress levels. Find a place of calm clarity with this guided meditation session. 

Conclusion:

Find some time during your day to use the practice of meditation and feel a wave of peace in every part of your body. It’s certain you will find profound effects with this simple practice using these relaxation scripts for a simple meditation. Keep in mind these 5 minute meditation scripts are for informational purposes only, and not intended to replace the recommendations of your doctor or other medical professional’s advice.

Martin Hamilton

Martin enjoys writing and blogging. Martin has a background in Psychology, Mindfulness Practices, and Organizational Development. Martin believes the true teacher never controls anyone's life in any way—instead, they merely explain how to advance consciousness, and that results in true personal freedom.

Recent Posts

Mindfulness Techniques to Stop Ruminating and Overthinking

Overthinking and ruminating can take a toll on one's mental health and well-being. Fortunately, mindfulness has been proven to be an effective tool for breaking free from these negative habits....

Psychology of Mindfulness: Unlocking the Power of Present Moment Awareness

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the fast-paced world we live in? Do you find yourself constantly worrying about the future or dwelling on the past? The practice of mindfulness may be just what you...

Deep Dharma

Right Speech

Only speak when it will improve the silence.

These lists are from The Gradual Sayings, the earliest scriptures of Buddhism, and seem as relevant for practice today as they were 2500 years ago! All twenty elements from the lists should, ideally, be practiced in our daily interactions with ourselves, our families, our colleagues and communities, and everyone with whom we interact. Right speech is one of the most important practices in the Buddhist tradition.

6 Elements of Right Speech

  • Only speak when conditions suggest you should speak
  • Only speak truthfully
  • Only speak when you have something to say that will be of benefit
  • Always speak in ways that can be understood
  • Only say it once (if you said it truthfully, when conditions suggest is appropriate, and if it is beneficial, then saying it more than once is being argumentative)
  • Never go on the battlefield (arguing is not right speech); being of benefit isn’t about winning

4 Elements of Wrong Speech

  • Harsh, mean-spirited, threatening or angry words
  • Falsehoods and slander
  • Gossip and small talk
  • Belittling others and especially belittling others to raise your own status

5 Qualities of Wrong Speech

  • Flattery [complimenting a benefactor in hope of getting something in return]
  • Hinting [at things you want to receive]
  • Being verbally passive aggressive or bullying
  • Using words to exert pressure [in order to get something from someone]
  • Being on “one’s best” verbal behavior to deceive another [inauthentic speech]

5 Points To Be Borne in Mind When Wishing To Rebuke Another

  • I will speak at the proper time, internally and externally
  • I will state the truth
  • I will speak gently
  • I will speak for the other’s good
  • I will speak from patience and compassion, not with enmity

Some Practices with Right Speech

Never go on the battlefield. If you have said it when conditions suggest it can be understood, and said it in a way that can be perceived as beneficial, then saying it once is enough. There is nothing to protect and defend if right speech is used.

For a week, commit not to speak about anyone who is not in the room . In other words, no gossip, small talk, or belittling of others.

For a week, commit not to flatter anyone . Note how all flattery has a wrong speech aspect, if not obviously, then covertly.

When in meetings or groups, remain the smallest person in the room . This encourages genuine modesty and reduces the possibility of wrong speech.

LOTS OF TALK ABOUT RIGHT SPEECH

  Thanissaro Bhikkhu:

As my teacher once said, “If you can’t control your mouth, there’s no way you can hope to control your mind.’ This is why right speech is so important in day-to-day practice.

Right speech, explained in negative terms, means avoiding four types of harmful speech: lies (words spoken with the intent of misrepresenting the truth); divisive speech (spoken with the intent of creating rifts between people); harsh speech (spoken with the intent of hurting another person’s feelings); and idle chatter (spoken with no purposeful intent at all).

Notice the focus on intent: this is where the practice of right speech intersects with the training of the mind. Before you speak, you focus on why you want to speak. This helps get you in touch with all the machinations taking place in the committee of voices running your mind. If you see any unskillful motives lurking behind the committee’s decisions, you veto them. As a result, you become more aware of yourself, more honest with yourself, more firm with yourself. You also save yourself from saying things that you’ll later regret. In this way you strengthen qualities of mind that will be helpful in meditation, at the same time avoiding any potentially painful memories that would get in the way of being attentive to the present moment when the time comes to meditate.

In positive terms, right speech means speaking in ways that are trustworthy, harmonious, comforting, and worth taking to heart. When you make a practice of these positive forms of right speech, your words become a gift to others. In response, other people will start listening more to what you say, and will be more likely to respond in kind. This gives you a sense of the power of your actions: the way you act in the present moment does shape the world of your experience. You don’t need to be a victim of past events.

Master Yin Shun:

There are three kinds of right speech:

  • Comforting speech : We should communicate in a warm manner when seeing one another. When we meet people who are sick, or suffering or who live in fear, we should encourage and provide them with psychological support. Even though we might not give them great help, if we have gentle speech and a compassionate attitude, they will appreciate our efforts.
  • Rejoicing speech : Every individual has his or her own strengths. Even a bad person has good qualities. Whenever we see good, we should rejoice, encourage and inspire them with our speech to do more good. If we want to teach others, we should start praising them in order to give them confidence in their strengths and virtues. They will not only be appreciative towards us but will soon be walking on the path of goodness.
  • Inspiring speech : This helps others to progress. For example, for a person who is practicing giving, we should guide him to observe the precepts. We should not restrict the usage of our speech to those of pleasant and gentle words. Sometimes we may have to use firm 
and angry words to urge someone to progress. When we do, if it is to be accepted, we must do it with sincerity and selflessness.

Master Ji Ru:

What would happen if you changed “Right” to “Pure”?

Patricia Phelan:

In Returning to Silence Katagiri Roshi discusses Dogen’s teaching on Right Speech saying, “Kind speech is not merely speaking with an ingratiating voice, like a cat purring…[this] very naturally, consciously or unconsciously, is trying to get a favor by fawning or flattering. This is not kind speech. Kind speech is not the usual sense of kindness. It can appear in various ways, but …we should remember that it must constantly be based on compassion…. Under all circumstances that compassion is always giving somebody support or help or a chance to grow.” Here he expands the scope of kind speech to include that which gives a person a “chance to grow”.

I would like to focus on speech as practice and its relationship to concentration. The “Right” of Right Speech has the meaning of completed or perfected. Through Right Speech, by not indulging in or listening to such things as lying, back-biting, harsh speech or gossip, we can establish a link between our mental activity and our conduct or between Right Thought and Right Action, two other aspects of the Eight-Fold Path.

When Buddhism was established, communication was almost exclusively through the spoken word. But, in our culture Right Speech really means “Right Communication” and it includes all forms of communication such as television, movies, radio, newspapers, magazines, advertising and, of course, the internet. So, Right Speech means using communication as a way to further our understanding of ourselves and others and as a way to develop insight.

In addition to speech being linked to discriminative consciousness, speech is also an outflow. The Sanskrit word is ásrava , and Thich Nhat Hanh translates it as energy leak. When we begin to develop concentration during a longer sitting, our concentrative energy will leak through speech. Not that we should be clinging to our concentration, but you can watch it and feel it dissipate with chatter. This is also true in our daily activity. Speech requires energy.

Conscious speech is a rich practice, where we not only practice awareness of what we say and how we say it; but at a deeper level we can begin to notice the impulse, the driving force that propels us into speech and how our state of mind and our energy are affected before, during, and after speaking. This practice shifts the precepts from being a standard used to modify our behavior to a way of working with our state of mind, the source of all speech.

Norman Fischer:

Right Speech, as it is commonly interpreted, includes the obvious abstention against lies, slander, rude or harsh language, careless speech, useless speech, and gossip.

A more subtle aspect of Right Speech, an action resulting from incorrect thought, is the lie that refuses to accept reality as it is, was, or will be.  Buddhist scholar Archie Bahm writes:  “…any, assertion, or willingness to assert, that things are, or should be, other than they are, or are going to be other than they are, is a lie. Unwillingness to accept things as they are is the basis of lying, and any expression of that unwillingness is wrong speech….”

The direct result from Right Speech is meaningful communication that is naturally friendly and amiable towards others.  “If one cannot say something useful, one should keep `noble silence’.”  An example of “noble silence” is a story about a roshi (zen master) and his student enjoying a beautiful morning. The student says: “What a beautiful morning.”  The Roshi responds: “Yes, but what a pity to say so.”

The first three members of the eightfold path are right view, right intention, and right speech. These make right conduct possible and when there is right conduct there can be meditation practice and mindfulness, which leads to wisdom, reinforcing right view. So from the first, the Buddha saw that our language conditions our spirituality through our views, intentions, and uttered words, and that training in an increased awareness of this process had to be the starting point for spiritual practice.

—–

In his discussion of right speech the Buddha similarly evidenced the subtle and nuanced understanding that words do not have fixed meanings and ought never to be taken at face value. The meanings of words depend on context: who is speaking and listening, the tone of voice employed, the underlying attitude evidenced, and the situation in which the words are spoken. The very fact that the Buddha did not recommend that his words be written down, that he allowed others to explain the teachings in their own words, and did not designate a special holy language for religious discourse, but insisted that ordinary common language be used, shows that he understood language to be a process, essentially a dialog, a dynamic experience, rather than a tool of exact description or explanation. Far from being a neutral conduit for the conveying of preexisting meanings, the Buddha saw that language is an ever-shifting vehicle for the self, and that the way to clarify the self, and the world, is to hold language in an accurate and sensitive way.

Bhikkhu Bodhi:

Right speech, right action, and right livelihood­ may be treated together, as collectively they make up the first of the three divisions of the path, the division of moral discipline. Though the principles laid down in this section restrain immoral actions and promote good conduct, their ultimate purpose is not so much ethical as spiritual. They are not prescribed merely as guides to action, but primarily as aids to mental purification. As a necessary measure for human well-being, ethics has its own justification in the Buddha’s teaching and its importance cannot be underrated. But in the special context of the noble eightfold path ethical principles are subordinate to the path’s governing goal, final deliverance from suffering. Thus for the moral training to become a proper part of the path, it has to be taken up under the tutelage of the first two factors, right view and right intention, and to lead beyond to the trainings in concentration and wisdom.

Sharon Salzberg:

The key to Right Speech is to know our intentions before we speak, and to know our intentions we need mindfulness. Right speech can be very subtle, it’s a ground we cultivate in meditation.

There are three aspects to every action or speech. There is the intention behind it, there is the skillfulness of the action, and there is the immediate response to the action. We tend to ground our identities only in the third aspect, and to ignore the first two.

Alan Senauke:

I try to ask myself, Are my words true, useful, and timely ? All three conditions must be met when we speak to another. Our words represent karmic activity. They are action of a kind, and so generate a complexity of responses and effect. Considering what is true, useful, and timely, means recognizing what our own self-centered views might be. Then we try to sense if our words will help another person become free from their own self-centered views, or will they just help the self dig a deeper rut.

We welcome your thoughts, ideas, comments and contributions. Just email them to us via our Contact Form.

Mindful Speaking

By Gil Fronsdal

There’s a Buddhist saying that states: “When meditating, watch your mind. When in the world, watch your words.” Being mindful of what we say is as important as being aware of what goes on in the mind. In fact, some aspects of the mind do not reveal themselves until we talk. By becoming aware of what motivates our speaking we can discover aspects of our inner life that may be “off- line” when meditating or when we are alone.

Some people find speaking to be one of the most challenging areas in which to be mindful. The interpersonal concerns, wishes, and feelings that come into play when speaking can be so compelling it is easy to lose ourselves in conversations.

By being attentive while speaking it is possible to grow in self-understanding. One way to do this is to simply ask yourself why you say what you do. What motivations prompt you to speak? What emotions and feelings influence what you say? What are you trying to accomplish in speaking? What are you thinking just before speaking?

Often there is not just one answer to these questions. Continued reflection can reveal how complex and varied the motivations are for what we say. Even something as simple as providing information someone has asked for can have multiple motivations or influences. Most obviously we may want to be helpful. In addition we may wish to make a good impression or, at least, avoid a bad impression of ourselves. We may hope for something in return, even if it is just a bit of appreciation or admiration. We may desire to keep the conversation going or we may be trying to end it. We might speak out of a generous impulse or it may be out of a sense of duty. Because there can be so many simultaneous motivations or concerns operating in even the simplest act of speaking, it is useful to keep inquiring so we can recognize as many intentions as possible.

Being mindful as we speak can reduce tension we may have while speaking. This is especially the case when mindfulness includes “bodyfulness”, i.e., awareness of our body as we speak. When we recognize the physical tensions or strains that build as we speak, we can relax, or at least not continue letting the tension build. We might notice that our physical posture and gestures reinforce psychological tensions as much as express them. The more we are aware of these physical aspects of speaking, the wiser we can be about how we use our body.

The rewards of mindful speaking are great. We are less likely to say things we later regret and more likely to speak wisely and thoughtfully. Remaining mindful while speaking gives us more choice in what we say. By recognizing these choices, speaking can become more deliberate and considered. For those on a path of compassion and liberation it becomes possible to choose. The Buddha provided five criteria for deciding when to speak. These are to speak what is true, kind, useful, timely, and conducive to concord. For the Buddha, all five of these criteria must be met before speaking.

Liberation and compassion depend on being honest. Mindfulness itself is a practice of honest recognition of what is happening. When we speak what is not true we are going “against the grain” of the Buddhist path; we are heading north when we are trying to go south. By speaking only what is true we are also speaking in ways that support the clear seeing that mindfulness fosters. As the saying goes, Lies hide, truth reveals .

Just because something is true doesn’t mean that speaking it is kind. In fact it can sometimes be so unkind that speaking the truth is likened to a stick with which to club people. The greater good for everyone, including the person who speaks, is better attained by speaking with genuine interest in the welfare of others. How we speak has a powerful effect on the way we affect each other. While speaking harshly with hostility may accomplish what we want in the short term, it is counterproductive in the long term. By speaking in ways that are kind, friendly and respectful, we are better able to foster ongoing considerate regard for each other. By speaking with kindness people are also better able to hear the important things we have to say. Or even better, we can aspire to speak so people are uplifted more than depressed by what we say. The saying associated with this is, Kind speech are words from the heart .

Speaking the truth is not always useful or beneficial. It is not useful if whom you are speaking to is unable to hear it or take it into account. It is counterproductive if the person ends the conversation or becomes excessively defensive or offensive. Considering how to speak the truth is an aspect of considering what is useful. Speaking respectfully is helpful, as is being careful with the words we use or the tone of voice in which it is spoken. The saying is, If not beneficial, why say it?

Sometimes it is only useful to speak if the timing is right. By including ‘timeliness’ as one of the criteria for speaking, the Buddha is encouraging us to be mindful of the context of the situation and of the person to whom we are talking. Someone may not be in the mood for the conversation, or they may not have the time or energy to attentively listen. They may be too preoccupied or defensive. Or perhaps it is not useful or kind to speak about some things if third parties are listening. Even though something is true doesn’t mean it is appropriate or helpful for the conversation to be public. It can therefore be useful to wait, sometimes a long time, until the time is right for speaking. The saying is, Only when the time is right does truth take flight .

The final criterion for mindful speech is to consider whether what we are going to say and how we are going to say it is conducive for social concord. Does what we say create more division and separation between others and ourselves or does it support mutual understanding, healthier relationships, and social harmony? Stated more simply, do we speak so it pushes people apart or brings them closer? This last criterion is an encouragement to avoid any rigid separation between self and others, between one’s own group and other groups of people, and between one’s own welfare and the welfare of others. Instead we search for ways to have mutual understanding and mutual support. This is related to the saying, Speak so you become each other’s companion on the journey .

These five criteria are particularly important when we are having difficult conversations. At those times strong mindfulness can help us avoid saying that which makes things worse, not better. Not only can we stay rooted in the present moment so we can track our feelings, thoughts and impulses before we speak, it is also a time to consider if what we are about to say is true, kind, useful, timely, and conducive to concord. If it’s not, then it is time to consider other options for how and when to speak.

Speech is an expression of one’s inner life. Through mindfulness we can better care for the quality, well-being and development of our inner life. Prior to speaking ask: Is it true? Is it kind? Is it useful? Is it timely? Is it conducive to concord?

Recent Posts

  • Mindfulness Meditation and Practice Half-Day with Tanya Wiser — Saturday, March 9
  • 7:00 a.m. YouTube Community Meeting with Metta
  • Farewell to our friend Lolly Font
  • Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation Daylong Retreat with bruni dávila — Saturday, March 2
  • Earth Care Meeting: A Biologist’s Take on Climate Change and CO2 Removal with Barry Rothman — Saturday February 24

Mindworks logo

  • All Meditation Courses
  • Journey to Well-Being
  • Life Navigation Courses
  • Journey to Liberation
  • Journey to Compassion
  • Mind Trainers
  • Why Mindworks
  • 501c3 Nonprofit
  • Get Your Free Meditation Ebook
  • Membership & Pricing
  • Meditation Course Gift Certificates
  • Events & Webinars

Home Blog The Benefits of Practicing Mindfulness of Speech

The Benefits of Practicing Mindfulness of Speech

Category: How to Meditate | Mindfulness and Awareness | Recent Meditation Posts

An artistic image of a flower arrangement - symbolizing mindfulness of speech

The Benefits of Mindful Speech (The Power of Words in Communication)

Buddhist teachings, including the foundational teaching of the Four Noble Truths , remind us that our own personal behavior dictates our experience of the world. Behavior includes what we do, say, and think. Practicing mindfulness of body, speech, and mind helps guide us to act in ways that reduce suffering. Mindfulness of speech is a particularly consequential practice, as speech, sandwiched between body and mind, brings our thoughts to life.

To practice mindful speech is to be aware of what you say out loud and how you say it. We are practicing mindful speaking when we’re present in our conversations, choose our words with care, and maintain an awareness regarding not just what we want to communicate, but how it may be received.

Mindfulness of speech is a means of reducing harm, thus avoiding negative karma . We can also use mindful speech to generate merit by intentionally speaking well of others and sharing words of lovingkindness. Even if we are unsure of concepts like karma and merit , we can understand how purposefully selecting our words is a means of protecting the mind.

When we tell lies or speak in ways that harm or divide others, we find it hard to experience peace. In fact, we’re actively contributing to dis-ease and agitation in the mind. One way to help reduce negative or harmful thoughts is by becoming more selective regarding the thoughts we give voice to. Stop gossiping, for example, and you may find yourself judging others less often.

Speaking mindfully can transform our outer experience as well. When what we say is hurtful or untrustworthy, people stop listening to us. If you feel unheard or ignored, get curious about what you’ve been giving voice to. This includes what we say in conversation with others, but also, the content of our emails, social media posts, and online comments.

Speak honestly, kindly, and meaningfully and you’ll begin to hear more of the same. Your voice will become more beautiful and people will want to listen to you. In this way, mindfulness of speech has the power to change your reality.

Mindful Speaking Exercises

Mindfulness of speech is such an important practice for Buddhists that it has made its way to several top-10 lists. You’ll find mindful speaking practices prescribed in the following teachings:

  • The 8-Fold Path

The Buddha prescribed the 8-fold path as a means to the cessation of suffering. Right Speech occupies a spot here alongside Right View, Right Intention, and Right Action. In this case, ‘right’ is defined as wholesome, skillful, and wise.

  • The 5 Precepts

Precepts are commitments made as part of taking refuge in the Buddhist path . This foundational code of ethics includes a vow not to lie. Being honest isn’t merely about avoiding bold falsehoods, it includes communicating clearly regarding what you hold to be true.

  • The 10 Misdeeds

Avoiding the 10 non-virtuous actions helps us live with greater stability of mind. Four of the ten refer to speaking more skillfully. By speaking honestly, gently, and meaningfully in ways that bring people together, we contribute peaceful and positive energy to the world, for our own benefit and for the benefit of everyone, everywhere.

Practicing points of mindful speech include staying silent as necessary. The old adage to remain quiet if you can’t find anything nice to say is the practice of mindful responsiveness. To improve mindfulness of speech, meditation is helpful. A stable, more spacious mind helps us to slow down and observe what is arising. In the gap between stimulus and response , the most wise and compassionate action may be to bite our to

Share this Post

About the Author: Sara-Mai Conway

Sara-Mai Conway writes articles about Buddhist meditation based on her practice and experience

Find an Article

Sign up for our newsletter and get our e-book free.

Opt out at any time

Download Mindworks on the App Store

Recent Posts

An image of a beautiful sunset over a Buddhist monastery - symbolizing view, meditation and action

View, Meditation, Action: Synergy on the Buddhist Path

an image of a wrathful Buddhist deity or protector, but Buddhism is not pessimistic

Is Buddhism Pessimistic?

An image of a Buddha statue with his hand touching the earth, symbol of enlightenment. Buddha taught dependent origination

What Is Dependent Origination?

Popular Categories

  • Mind Trainer Articles
  • How to Meditate
  • Buddhist Path
  • Health and Meditation
  • Meditation and the Brain

Begin your journey and take our most popular course for free!

Mindworks goal is simple—we want to help you discover the transformative power of meditation so that you can live your best life. As a 501c3 nonprofit, your support enables us to bring accessible, authentic meditation guidance to a worldwide community.

  • Live Events and Webinars

Quick-Links

  • About Mindworks
  • Membership and Pricing
  • Privacy Policy

© 2024 Mindworks Inc | All Rights Reserved | 501c3 Nonprofit | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

Inner Health Studio

Guided Meditation Scripts

Use these guided meditation scripts to calm the mind and relax the body. Meditation is the act of focusing the mind to relax, improve inner awareness, and make positive mental or physical changes.

Are you looking for guided meditation audio? Listen to audio for free on the meditation downloads page.

Meditating often has a number of health benefits such as better pain tolerance . In addition, meditation will help you improve your memory, cope with stress more effectively (physical, mental, and emotional), sleep better, and have an improved immune system.

You may notice that many of the relaxation exercises here fit into more than one category. Some of the meditation scripts could also be classified as guided imagery scripts , anxiety relief relaxation, sleep relaxation, relaxation guided meditation scripts , or other types of relaxation technique. Some of the meditation scripts on this page can also be found on these other pages, but they are organized here according to the purpose and type of meditation involved. If you’re looking for scripts that help focus on and image or scene, you’ll want to check out the guided visualization scripts page.

If you are looking for a basic introduction to meditation, start with the basic meditation scripts below for an introduction to how to meditate. As you become familiar with meditating and start to develop the skill to focus the mind, you will easily be able to use meditation techniques to make positive changes and to learn new skills (check out the scripts below for learning and growth – for example, learning to play a musical instrument).

Basic Meditation Scripts

Breathing Awareness Meditation This breathing awareness relaxation script will guide you to focus on each stage of a breath as you breathe slowly and gently.

Beginner’s Breathing Meditation This breathing meditation script will guide you to relax by focusing on your breathing.

Counting Meditation This counting meditation script will guide you to relax with meditation, using counting. Counting will allow you to focus your mind, which will lead to deep relaxation.

Cue Words Relaxation This cue words relaxation script will guide you to relax your body, and then further calm the mind by repeating cues to relax.

Spiritual Meditation Meditation is effective in reducing blood pressure, decreasing anxiety, improving pain tolerance, raising mood, and counteracting the harmful effects of stress. Spiritual is defined here as whatever gives YOU meaning.

Meditations for Healing

Relaxation for Pain Relief Relaxation of any type is effective for pain management. People who do relaxation exercises are better able to tolerate pain, AND they actually feel less pain.

Healing Relaxation This healing relaxation begins with passive progressive muscle relaxation, and then guides you to imagine your body healing itself.

Dealing with Grief This guided relaxation will help to normalize the grief experience and explain the stages of grief.

Active Meditation Exercises

Morning Relaxation: Guided Energy Starter This quick morning relaxation is a guided energy starter that will help you to become wide awake, energetic, and ready for the day ahead. Listen to this audio any time of day to get your energy going.

A Relaxing Walk This relaxation script will guide you to take a relaxing walk – not just in your mind, but actually physically walking to relax.

Martial Arts Training Guided Imagery for Kickboxing or Muay Thai Guided mental rehearsal of various punching and kicking techniques for martial arts training to help prepare for Kickboxing or Muay Thai martial arts competition.

Martial Arts Competition Guided Imagery for Kickboxing or Muay Thai This guided imagery script involves mental rehearsal to prepare for martial arts competition in kickboxing or Muay Thai, become comfortable with combinations, and increase confidence.

Meditations for Learning and Growth

Meditation for Acting This guided meditation for acting helps you, as an actor, to focus on getting into the character’s state of mind, understand the character you are playing, and act effectively.

Water Meditation: Trusting the People Who Do Medical Procedures Written by Diana. This story is an imagination journey about a main character who helps you relax and overcome fear of medical procedures. Specifically this story is about the fear of needles.

Learn an Instrument Meditation Feeling relaxed and confident can help you learn an instrument or other new skill more easily. This meditation aims to help increase confidence and motivation when learning to play an instrument.

Learn a Language Meditation This meditation script will help with learning a language by guiding you to relax and improve your concentration.

Relaxation for Homework Anxiety Using Relaxation Paint (by Diana) This relaxation for overcoming homework anxiety, written by Diana, uses the example of homework when learning a language, specifically when learning how a language works.

When Relaxation Causes Anxiety: Relaxation for Homework Anxiety Application Written by Diana, with a script by Patti Teel. If you find that relaxation causes anxiety, this script can help you learn to become calm, relaxed, and comfortable with relaxation techniques.

Relaxation to Deal with Anger This guided relaxation script describes how to deal with anger quickly and effectively in the moment. Guides you in controlling anger in a healthy, productive way.

Becoming More Playful This relaxation script begins by guiding you to relax your mind, and then use visualization, meditation, and imagery to get in touch with your inner playfulness.

Overcoming procrastination This relaxation script is for overcoming procrastination by dealing with some of the causes of this behavior and increasing motivation to deal with the things on your to do list.

Decreasing Self Harm Behavior This relaxation script is for teens or adults with self harm behavior or nervous rituals and aims to create a feeling of calm and then explore more positive coping alternatives.

Relaxation to Deal with Loneliness This relaxation script is to deal with loneliness by increasing confidence, developing a strong sense of self, and getting ready to take action to decrease loneliness.

Meditations for Improved Self Esteem

Self-Esteem Relaxation Relax with affirmations, meditation, visualization and deep breathing. This self-esteem relaxation can be used to promote positive self-image and help you fall asleep in a positive frame of mind.

Relaxation for Positive Self-Image This relaxation for positive self image helps to increase positive thinking, healthy self-concept, confidence, and self-esteem.

Affirmations for Self-Esteem This affirmations for self-esteem relaxation script includes affirmations to increase self-esteem and confidence and promote a general feeling of calm.

Finding Your Authentic Self Explore your values and connect with your authentic self. Use this relaxation technique to get in touch with your true self, live up to your full potential, and live according to your true identity.

Body Image Relaxation This body image relaxation script is a guided meditation focused on self-acceptance and self-image.

Dealing with Rejection or Failure Our own self-talk can contribute to the pain and low self-esteem that is sometimes associated with rejection or failure. This relaxation script will help you to identify and change upsetting thoughts.

A Variety of Relaxation Exercises with Meditation Components

Anchoring Relaxation “Anchoring” is an effective way to train your body to quickly relax by making an association in your brain between a state of relaxation and touching a specific spot on your hand or wrist.

Body Scan Sleep Relaxation This body scan sleep relaxation uses a variety of relaxation techiques to help calm the mind and body and drift off to sleep.

Calming Down from Good News This relaxation script is for calming down from good news. It will help you achieve a state of calm so you can focus or sleep as needed.

Relaxation During Pregnancy Relaxation during pregnancy is safe and effective for reducing stress, feeling calm, and increasing physical and mental comfort. Use relaxation techniques to get rid of nausea, headaches, and minor pain without taking medications.

Overcoming Freeze Response Freeze is a common response to fear, especially in life-threatening situations that are difficult to escape. This relaxation script uses grounding techniques to help you decrease panic symptoms.

Relax Under Pressure Learn to relax under pressure with this guided relaxation that will help you to remain calm, focused, and not nervous in a high pressure environment, such as a job interview, presentation, or test.

Stop Guilt When Not Busy Many people find it difficult to relax because they feel guilty when they are not busy. Overcome the constant pressure to be busy and the guilt and restlessness interfere with relaxing.

The Guided Meditation Site Are you yearning for complete relaxation and inner peace? Then visit the world’s most comprehensive guided meditation website where you can learn how to meditate for free, enjoy meditation music, and experience the bliss of guided meditations.

Appointments at Mayo Clinic

Meditation: a simple, fast way to reduce stress.

Meditation can wipe away the day's stress, bringing with it inner peace. See how you can easily learn to practice meditation whenever you need it most.

If stress has you anxious, tense and worried, you might try meditation. Spending even a few minutes in meditation can help restore your calm and inner peace.

Anyone can practice meditation. It's simple and doesn't cost much. And you don't need any special equipment.

You can practice meditation wherever you are. You can meditate when you're out for a walk, riding the bus, waiting at the doctor's office or even in the middle of a business meeting.

Understanding meditation

Meditation has been around for thousands of years. Early meditation was meant to help deepen understanding of the sacred and mystical forces of life. These days, meditation is most often used to relax and lower stress.

Meditation is a type of mind-body complementary medicine. Meditation can help you relax deeply and calm your mind.

During meditation, you focus on one thing. You get rid of the stream of thoughts that may be crowding your mind and causing stress. This process can lead to better physical and emotional well-being.

Benefits of meditation

Meditation can give you a sense of calm, peace and balance that can benefit your emotional well-being and your overall health. You also can use it to relax and cope with stress by focusing on something that calms you. Meditation can help you learn to stay centered and keep inner peace.

These benefits don't end when your meditation session ends. Meditation can help take you more calmly through your day. And meditation may help you manage symptoms of some medical conditions.

Meditation and emotional and physical well-being

When you meditate, you may clear away the information overload that builds up every day and contributes to your stress.

The emotional and physical benefits of meditation can include:

  • Giving you a new way to look at things that cause stress.
  • Building skills to manage your stress.
  • Making you more self-aware.
  • Focusing on the present.
  • Reducing negative feelings.
  • Helping you be more creative.
  • Helping you be more patient.
  • Lowering resting heart rate.
  • Lowering resting blood pressure.
  • Helping you sleep better.

Meditation and illness

Meditation also might help if you have a medical condition. This is most often true if you have a condition that stress makes worse.

A lot of research shows that meditation is good for health. But some experts believe there's not enough research to prove that meditation helps.

With that in mind, some research suggests that meditation may help people manage symptoms of conditions such as:

  • Chronic pain.
  • Depression.
  • Heart disease.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Sleep problems.
  • Tension headaches.

Be sure to talk to your healthcare professional about the pros and cons of using meditation if you have any of these or other health conditions. Sometimes, meditation might worsen symptoms linked to some mental health conditions.

Meditation doesn't replace medical treatment. But it may help to add it to other treatments.

Types of meditation

Meditation is an umbrella term for the many ways to get to a relaxed state. There are many types of meditation and ways to relax that use parts of meditation. All share the same goal of gaining inner peace.

Ways to meditate can include:

Guided meditation. This is sometimes called guided imagery or visualization. With this method of meditation, you form mental images of places or things that help you relax.

You try to use as many senses as you can. These include things you can smell, see, hear and feel. You may be led through this process by a guide or teacher.

  • Mantra meditation. In this type of meditation, you repeat a calming word, thought or phrase to keep out unwanted thoughts.

Mindfulness meditation. This type of meditation is based on being mindful. This means being more aware of the present.

In mindfulness meditation, you focus on one thing, such as the flow of your breath. You can notice your thoughts and feelings. But let them pass without judging them.

  • Qigong. This practice most often combines meditation, relaxation, movement and breathing exercises to restore and maintain balance. Qigong (CHEE-gung) is part of Chinese medicine.
  • Tai chi. This is a form of gentle Chinese martial arts training. In tai chi (TIE-CHEE), you do a series of postures or movements in a slow, graceful way. And you do deep breathing with the movements.
  • Yoga. You do a series of postures with controlled breathing. This helps give you a more flexible body and a calm mind. To do the poses, you need to balance and focus. That helps you to focus less on your busy day and more on the moment.

Parts of meditation

Each type of meditation may include certain features to help you meditate. These may vary depending on whose guidance you follow or who's teaching a class. Some of the most common features in meditation include:

Focused attention. Focusing your attention is one of the most important elements of meditation.

Focusing your attention is what helps free your mind from the many things that cause stress and worry. You can focus your attention on things such as a certain object, an image, a mantra or even your breathing.

  • Relaxed breathing. This technique involves deep, even-paced breathing using the muscle between your chest and your belly, called the diaphragm muscle, to expand your lungs. The purpose is to slow your breathing, take in more oxygen, and reduce the use of shoulder, neck and upper chest muscles while breathing so that you breathe better.

A quiet setting. If you're a beginner, meditation may be easier if you're in a quiet spot. Aim to have fewer things that can distract you, including no television, computers or cellphones.

As you get more skilled at meditation, you may be able to do it anywhere. This includes high-stress places, such as a traffic jam, a stressful work meeting or a long line at the grocery store. This is when you can get the most out of meditation.

  • A comfortable position. You can practice meditation whether you're sitting, lying down, walking, or in other positions or activities. Just try to be comfortable so that you can get the most out of your meditation. Aim to keep good posture during meditation.
  • Open attitude. Let thoughts pass through your mind without judging them.

Everyday ways to practice meditation

Don't let the thought of meditating the "right" way add to your stress. If you choose to, you can attend special meditation centers or group classes led by trained instructors. But you also can practice meditation easily on your own. There are apps to use too.

And you can make meditation as formal or informal as you like. Some people build meditation into their daily routine. For example, they may start and end each day with an hour of meditation. But all you really need is a few minutes a day for meditation.

Here are some ways you can practice meditation on your own, whenever you choose:

Breathe deeply. This is good for beginners because breathing is a natural function.

Focus all your attention on your breathing. Feel your breath and listen to it as you inhale and exhale through your nostrils. Breathe deeply and slowly. When your mind wanders, gently return your focus to your breathing.

Scan your body. When using this technique, focus attention on each part of your body. Become aware of how your body feels. That might be pain, tension, warmth or relaxation.

Mix body scanning with breathing exercises and think about breathing heat or relaxation into and out of the parts of your body.

  • Repeat a mantra. You can create your own mantra. It can be religious or not. Examples of religious mantras include the Jesus Prayer in the Christian tradition, the holy name of God in Judaism, or the om mantra of Hinduism, Buddhism and other Eastern religions.

Walk and meditate. Meditating while walking is a good and healthy way to relax. You can use this technique anywhere you're walking, such as in a forest, on a city sidewalk or at the mall.

When you use this method, slow your walking pace so that you can focus on each movement of your legs or feet. Don't focus on where you're going. Focus on your legs and feet. Repeat action words in your mind such as "lifting," "moving" and "placing" as you lift each foot, move your leg forward and place your foot on the ground. Focus on the sights, sounds and smells around you.

Pray. Prayer is the best known and most widely used type of meditation. Spoken and written prayers are found in most faith traditions.

You can pray using your own words or read prayers written by others. Check the self-help section of your local bookstore for examples. Talk with your rabbi, priest, pastor or other spiritual leader about possible resources.

Read and reflect. Many people report that they benefit from reading poems or sacred texts and taking a few moments to think about their meaning.

You also can listen to sacred music, spoken words, or any music that relaxes or inspires you. You may want to write your thoughts in a journal or discuss them with a friend or spiritual leader.

  • Focus your love and kindness. In this type of meditation, you think of others with feelings of love, compassion and kindness. This can help increase how connected you feel to others.

Building your meditation skills

Don't judge how you meditate. That can increase your stress. Meditation takes practice.

It's common for your mind to wander during meditation, no matter how long you've been practicing meditation. If you're meditating to calm your mind and your mind wanders, slowly return to what you're focusing on.

Try out ways to meditate to find out what types of meditation work best for you and what you enjoy doing. Adapt meditation to your needs as you go. Remember, there's no right way or wrong way to meditate. What matters is that meditation helps you reduce your stress and feel better overall.

Related information

  • Relaxation techniques: Try these steps to lower stress - Related information Relaxation techniques: Try these steps to lower stress
  • Stress relievers: Tips to tame stress - Related information Stress relievers: Tips to tame stress
  • Video: Need to relax? Take a break for meditation - Related information Video: Need to relax? Take a break for meditation

There is a problem with information submitted for this request. Review/update the information highlighted below and resubmit the form.

From Mayo Clinic to your inbox

Sign up for free and stay up to date on research advancements, health tips, current health topics, and expertise on managing health. Click here for an email preview.

Error Email field is required

Error Include a valid email address

To provide you with the most relevant and helpful information, and understand which information is beneficial, we may combine your email and website usage information with other information we have about you. If you are a Mayo Clinic patient, this could include protected health information. If we combine this information with your protected health information, we will treat all of that information as protected health information and will only use or disclose that information as set forth in our notice of privacy practices. You may opt-out of email communications at any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link in the e-mail.

Thank you for subscribing!

You'll soon start receiving the latest Mayo Clinic health information you requested in your inbox.

Sorry something went wrong with your subscription

Please, try again in a couple of minutes

  • Meditation: In depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/meditation/overview.htm. Accessed Dec. 23, 2021.
  • Mindfulness meditation: A research-proven way to reduce stress. American Psychological Association. https://www.apa.org/topics/mindfulness/meditation. Accessed Dec. 23, 2021.
  • AskMayoExpert. Meditation. Mayo Clinic. 2021.
  • Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Meditation. In: Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2022. 61st ed. McGraw Hill; 2022. https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed Dec. 23, 2021.
  • Hilton L, et al. Mindfulness meditation for chronic pain: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2017; doi:10.1007/s12160-016-9844-2.
  • Seaward BL. Meditation. In: Essentials of Managing Stress. 5th ed. Jones & Bartlett Learning; 2021.
  • Seaward BL. Managing Stress: Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-Being. 9th ed. Burlington, Mass.: Jones & Bartlett Learning; 2018.

Products and Services

  • A Book: Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness
  • A very happy brain
  • Alternative cancer treatments: 11 options to consider
  • Brain tumor
  • What is a brain tumor? A Mayo Clinic expert explains
  • Brain tumor FAQs
  • Living with Brain Tumors
  • Long Term Brain Cancer Survivor
  • Meditation 2.0: A new way to meditate
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Punk Guitarist Survives Brain Tumor
  • Guided meditation video

Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission.

  • Opportunities

Mayo Clinic Press

Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic Press .

  • Mayo Clinic on Incontinence - Mayo Clinic Press Mayo Clinic on Incontinence
  • The Essential Diabetes Book - Mayo Clinic Press The Essential Diabetes Book
  • Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance - Mayo Clinic Press Mayo Clinic on Hearing and Balance
  • FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment - Mayo Clinic Press FREE Mayo Clinic Diet Assessment
  • Mayo Clinic Health Letter - FREE book - Mayo Clinic Press Mayo Clinic Health Letter - FREE book
  • Meditation A simple fast way to reduce stress

Show the heart some love!

Help us advance cardiovascular medicine.

  • LAW & CRIME
  • PUBLIC SAFETY
  • ENTERTAINMENT
  • ALL STORIES

ROMAN CHIARELLO

To Persuade Speech: How Meditation Improves Health

Transcribed from a speech originally delivered on April 11, 2018.

In 2004, ABC News anchor Dan Harris suffered a panic attack on live TV. His worst nightmare had just come true.

The inner voice he’d lived with for so long, the voice telling him he wasn’t good enough, had just shown itself in front of millions of people.

Just like Dan, many of us battle stressors that prevent us from living successful, wholesome lives. Today I will talk to you about the impacts of stressors on health and well-being, as well as introduce a possible solution to lessen these impacts.

What is the problem? The problem is stressful situations have consequences on our physical, mental, and behavioral well-being.

Stressors cause and worsen the development of many physical conditions. According to the Mayo Clinic, stress that’s left unchecked can contribute to many health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. The Mayo Clinic also highlights many other physical ailments that could be caused by stressors. These include headache, muscle tension, chest pain, fatigue, upset stomach, and sleep problems.

Beyond this, stressors also negatively affect mental health. A 2014 study conducted by USA Today asked teenagers how they’re feeling because of the stressors in their lives. They found that 40% of teens reported feeling irritable or angry, 36% reported feeling nervous or anxious, and also a third of respondents said that stress makes them overwhelmed, depressed, or sad.

And these effects are not just limited to teenagers. Brian Simmons, who was selected for an ABC News interview in 2014, spoke about his inabilities to control his outbursts of anger. He said “I would react very reactively.”

Brian and many other adults reach a boiling point after repeatedly facing stressors. And if these emotions are too much to bear, the stressors increase the likelihood that a person behaves in irrational and unsafe ways.

Their quality of sleep could be diminished by stress, which often keeps people awake at night. Stress also disrupts regular eating patterns, causing overeating, undereating, or even binge eating.

Becky Schmits, another person interviewed for the ABC News piece, remarked that she was emotionally eating, and that that became a way of life for her. She said, “Eating was like my security blanket.”

Those who are stressed also turn to cigarettes, alcohol, or other drugs as a means of coping. And all of these could have potentially dangerous consequences.

Its clear to see that the dangers posed by stress have profound effects on our well-being. However, understanding this is only half the battle.

The American Psychological Association reports that, although 56% of adults surveyed are able to effectively or be very good at identifying the stressors in their lives and when they’re feeling stressed, only 29% say they are doing an excellent or good job managing the stressors.

Many adults benefit from learning to manage or reduce stress through meditation. The solution is that meditation helps reduce the impacts of stressors on our physical, mental, and behavioral well-being.

By lessening the impacts of stressors, meditation can reduce the chances of developing physical conditions. One study, cited by the Huffington Post, showed that meditation training reduced concentrations of a protein linked to cardiovascular disease.

Another study, conducted by the Benson-Henry institute for mind-body medicine, showed that 66% of participants had naturally lower blood pressure levels after just three months of meditation.

Meditation also, beyond this, can have positive effects on our mental health. Surgeon and TV personality Dr. Mehmet Oz spoke with ABC’s Dan Harris about how meditation helped him overcome his own struggles in his life. Oz said, “Going inside my mind is no longer going behind enemy lines.”

Being better able to control emotions is something that is experienced by many people who practice meditation. Chris Nee, who created the Disney Channel series Doc McStuffins, told ABC News, “I was in a place where I was ready to fight every single little point on the show. I think it’s very mentally exhausting to be in that place.”

Nee also said that meditation “allows me to take a moment when negative responses come in, and not take it so personally.”

Meditation guided Nee and countless others to emotional stability in their lives. What’s more, as a result of these physical and mental improvements, those who practice meditation are less likely to behave in irrational and unsafe ways.

Chris Eckstedt, a father and recovering addict who was also interviewed by ABC News, spoke about his experiences with meditation. Discussing his addiction, he said, “When I was high or drunk, I all of a sudden felt like I fit in.” His desire for acceptance and normalcy was fueled by his dependence on drugs and alcohol.

However, meditation changed his outlook on life for the better. Later in the interview, he said, “I could have killed myself, and I would have missed out on so much. Who knows what the future will bring? I’m good right now. I’m so grateful for this idea of meditation.”

Today I talked to you about the impacts that stressors have on our physical, mental, and behavioral health. I also introduced meditation as a possible solution to lessen the impacts of these stressors in each of these areas.

Fourteen years after his panic attack, Dan Harris now lives a healthy, stable life. Meditation helped him achieve this inner peace, and it can help you overcome your stressors as well. Thank you.

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

meditation speech

These 6 Personality Types Will Never (Ever!) Hook Up Just For Fun

meditation speech

The Dark Side Of Each Personality Type

meditation speech

The ‘Dark Web Challenge’ Has YouTubers Ordering ‘Mystery Boxes’ From The Darkest Part Of The Internet

meditation speech

Is Momo Real? New Details About The Mysterious Account Terrifying Everyone On WhatsApp That May Have Encouraged A 12-Year-Old Girl To Commit Suicide (REPUBLISHED ON YAHOO)

meditation speech

Is Momo Real? New Details About The Mysterious Account Terrifying Everyone On WhatsApp That May Have Encouraged A 12-Year-Old Girl To Commit Suicide

ROMAN CHIARELLO

Logo

Speech on Importance Of Yoga And Meditation

Yoga and meditation hold vital roles in maintaining your well-being. They can help you handle stress, improve focus, and feel more relaxed. It’s not just about physical fitness, but also about nurturing your mind and soul.

Incorporating yoga and meditation in your daily routine can bring positive changes. It’s like a tool kit for achieving harmony and balance in your life. Such practices make you more aware, enabling you to lead a healthier and happier life.

1-minute Speech on Importance Of Yoga And Meditation

Good day, friends. Let’s talk about two great treasures in our lives – yoga and meditation. They are like two best friends who help us stay healthy and happy.

Yoga is not just about bending or twisting our bodies in different shapes. It’s a way to make our bodies strong, flexible, and energetic. Just think of it as food for your body. When you eat healthy, you feel good, right? Yoga works the same way. It helps to keep our bodies fit and fine.

Meditation, on the other hand, is food for our mind. Our minds are like monkeys, always jumping from one thought to another, making us feel restless and tired. Meditation is like a magical power that calms this monkey mind. It helps us think clearly, focus better, and feel peaceful.

Together, yoga and meditation work like magic. They help us balance our body and mind. Imagine you are riding a bicycle. If one wheel is bigger than the other, will you be able to ride properly? No, right? Similarly, if our body is fit but our mind is restless, or if our mind is calm but our body is weak, we cannot enjoy life fully. Yoga and meditation help us make both wheels of our life bicycle equal and strong.

In conclusion, yoga and meditation are like sun and moon. Both are important for a healthy and happy life. So, let’s make them our best friends. Let’s do yoga to keep our bodies strong and flexible. Let’s meditate to keep our minds calm and clear. Remember, a healthy body and a peaceful mind are the keys to a happy life. Thank you.

2-minute Speech on Importance Of Yoga And Meditation

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Today, we are going to talk about something that is as old as time, yet as relevant as the air we breathe – Yoga and Meditation. They are not just about touching your toes or sitting with your eyes closed. It’s about learning to be healthier and happier.

Let’s start with Yoga. It’s like a magic tool that helps us stay fit. When we do yoga, we bend, stretch, and twist our bodies in ways that are good for us. It’s like giving our body a good massage from the inside. Yoga helps our bones and muscles to be strong and flexible. It also helps our heart and lungs to work better. So, for those who want to run faster, jump higher, or just play longer, yoga is your secret weapon.

Then we have Meditation. It’s like giving a holiday to your mind. Our minds are always busy, thinking about homework, friends, games, and sometimes worries too. When we meditate, we give our mind a break from all these thoughts. We learn to focus and concentrate. This is very helpful when we need to study for a test or solve a difficult problem. Meditation also helps us to feel calm and happy. So, if you sometimes feel upset or angry, try meditation. It’s like a cool breeze on a hot day.

Yoga and Meditation also help us to understand ourselves better. When we do yoga, we pay attention to our body and how it moves. When we meditate, we pay attention to our thoughts and feelings. This makes us more aware and understanding. It makes us better at dealing with problems and emotions. So, if you want to become a better friend or a better student, try yoga and meditation.

Lastly, Yoga and Meditation are activities that anyone can do. You don’t need to be strong or flexible or quiet to start. You just need to be willing to try and to learn. You can do it at home or in a park. You can do it alone or with friends. You can do it for a few minutes or a few hours. It’s like a game that you can play in many ways.

So, to sum it up, Yoga and Meditation are not just exercises. They are ways to become healthier, happier, and better at what we do. They are like friends who are always there to help us. So, let’s make them a part of our lives. Let’s bend, stretch, breathe, and smile more. Let’s make every day a Yoga and Meditation day!

  • Speech on Importance Of Wildlife
  • Speech on Importance Of Voting
  • Speech on Importance Of Value

We also have speeches on more interesting topics that you may want to explore.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Morning Motivational Speech for Positive Energy | Positive Mindset Wake Up Wake Me Up: Morning Meditation and Motivation

  • Mental Health

Listen on Apple Podcasts Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

This morning, fuel your passion for life with this motivational speech for positive energy. Clear your mind for the day and set a positive intention to do your best. Check out my new show Look In: Guided Meditation On Apple: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/guided-meditation/id1720303338⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ On Spotify: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://open.spotify.com/show/0Hhw7FYYArvpoq5GEkM3b3?si=85e2899708fd458c⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Listen on Youtube: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.youtube.com/@LookInMeditation⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Listen to my Spotify playlists to keep the good vibes going this morning: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6nSXshDBPub8iigdyQJlWN?si=207f42f85dbc4b97⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Want to be more focused? Wish distractions would just melt away? Sign up for the WMU Focus Course! If you're interested in joining, all you need to do is sign up for the course here: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://wakemeuppod.gumroad.com/l/focus⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠. Get ad-free access to the entire WMU catalog + bonus content + 25% discount on WMU courses by joining the WMU Premium Feed. Sign up and start your 7-day free trial at ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://wakemeup.supercast.com/⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠. Follow the show on ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Youtube⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ -  ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Spotify⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ - ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Apple Podcasts⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ - ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Amazon⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ - ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Podchaser⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Listen on Podurama - ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://podurama.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Say hi or request an episode at ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.wakemeuppodcast.com/contact⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠. See visual guides for the yoga and stretches in WMU episodes at ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.wakemeuppodcast.com/stretches⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠. Follow our network on Instagram @ _heychamp **Only partake in the physical movements suggested in Wake Me Up episodes if you are physically able and in safe surroundings. All movements are done at the individual's own risk. Be safe, and always consult a doctor if you have any questions or concerns.** Have a wonderful day 😃

  • More Episodes
  • Tyler Brown

meditation speech

  • Online ASHA CEUs
  • Therapy Materials
  • Online Courses

Group Rates

Online course group options:, buy codes for your group.  purchase codes, register your group now.  enroll now , get a group quote.  request quote , submit a purchase order.  purchase order .

Online Course Groups

How To Register Your Group:

Large groups: 11+ save 25% - 35%, this option is for groups of 11+ individuals and/or if purchasing multiple courses. , buy codes for your group. purchase codes, visa, mastercard, discover, and american express are accepted on our website., purchase orders are accepted here: submit po, click here for more information, group rate applies to regular-priced courses only and cannot be combined with other sales, add-ons, bundles, or discount codes. offer excludes courses: #e01, #e95, #e128, & #e273., this option is for registering each of your small group members for the same course using a credit card through our website., first, gather each individual's first and last name and nss account number. all information must match exactly with their account at northernspeech.com., then, click here to register each group member*:   enroll & pay now  , *credit card payments are accepted individually or with one (1) card., group rate applies to regular-priced courses only and cannot be combined with other sales, add-ons, bundles, or discount codes. offer excludes courses: #e95, #e128, & #e273..

|  Contact Us | Online Course FAQ  |

0.15  ASHA CEUs

Rationale for meditation techniques in speech-language pathology practice #e186.

Presenters: Jennifer Llado, MS, CCC-SLP & Brenda Lovette, MS, CCC-SLP

Rationale For Meditation Techniques In Speech-Language Pathology Practice

Description

Learn to incorporate mindfulness practices into your speech, language, voice and cognitive therapy..

There is increasing scientific evidence that meditation and breath work practices have the potential to improve the structure and function of the brain. This course will review the literature and discuss evidence-based ways to incorporate mindfulness practices into your speech, language, cognitive and voice therapy with the adult population. This course will also discuss practical applications including documentation.

Offered for 0.15 ASHA CEUs – 1.5 contact hours.

Course Overview & Run Time

Course Overview – Run Time: 1:51:47

  • Introduction
  • Guided Meditation & Discussion
  • SLP Scope of Practice
  • Impact on the Body, Mind & Brain
  • Cognitive Rehab
  • Neuroprotection / Cognitive Maintenance
  • Language Therapy
  • Speech & Fluency
  • Guided Practice
  • Resources & Referrals
  • Closing Remarks

“Mindfulness as a therapy practice is a new concept to me but one that I think will be hugely beneficial in my practice."

– T.W., prior course participant

Read more comments about this course!

"I loved how the presenters used so many learning methods and intertwining real practice with how you would state goals and treatments. They also provided notes for presenting with real EBP to back up everything."

– D.F., prior course participant

Content Disclosures

The content of this online CE course does not focus exclusively on any specific proprietary product or service. Presenter financial and non-financial disclosures may be found in the Presenter & Disclosures area.

Course Format

Video PowerPoint presentation with author narration & downloadable handout. Stop and re-start the course at any point. Learners retain access to course content after completion for ongoing reference and review.

Comments From Prior Course Participants

"I enjoyed the research info and the practice." C.M. (Feb. 2024)

"I LOVED the examples and case studies. SO powerful. Examples of guided practice, and uses of mediation techniques for guiding progress for a variety of patients." M.C. (Jan. 2024)

"Incorporation of yoga was a beneficial topic. I liked the evidence from studies." K.C. (Dec. 2023)

"The effects of meditation on stress and anxiety were helpful to discuss. I enjoyed the interactive portions." S.F. (Nov. 2023)

"I found the mindfulness and stuttering topic to be most beneficial. I liked that the presenters were very knowledgeable and experienced in the mindful practices presented." J.B. (Nov. 2023)

"The goals, objectives, and the research were beneficial. I liked the clinical practice application with a recognition that the patient is more than just the speech, language, and cognitive disorder." C.S. (Nov. 2023)

"Evidence-based ways to use mindfulness in therapy." C.O. (Nov. 2023)

"I really enjoyed this class in finding the benefits of meditation. I will definitely educate my patients about the benefits of meditation and guide them and/or incorporate meditation in my therapy. I also have learned the benefits of mental health and will recommend it to family members. The goal writing was very helpful." L.D. (Nov. 2023)

"Incorporated basic principles of meditation into different types of therapy. I liked the new information in this course." E.N. (Oct. 2023)

"Learning how helpful and important our breath can be. I liked the mindfulness check ins." A.M. (Oct. 2023)

"Easy and manageable course. Learning that meditation could be helpful with dysfluency and decrease stuttering events was beneficial." A.V. (Sep. 2023)

"I liked all the research dedicated to meditation practice and examples of goal writing. Guided meditation and unilateral nostril breathing were helpful topics." K.K. (Sep. 2023)

"Learning the advantages of using meditation in practically all areas of speech pathology. Good handouts and explanations." V.G. (Sep. 2023)

"Application to cognitive rehab. I liked the examples of documentation and clinical applications." N.M. (Aug. 2023)

"I liked the use of mindfulness techniques for my patients with TBI." A.Z. (Jul. 2023)

"Learning how to write goals was beneficial. I liked how clear this course was." Y.K. (Jun. 2023)

"I liked the research. I am a MBSR instructor and am pleased to see more people are understanding it." W.N. (May 2023)

"Discussing the importance of meditation was beneficial." B.J. (May 2023)

"Good content. Convenient course. I liked the review of research on the benefits of meditation and mindfulness." K.L. (Mar. 2023)

"Learning how Mindfulness can be used with the geriatric population." N.H. (Feb. 2023)

"I liked the techniques used in therapy and the research studies showing the benefits of meditation for different diagnoses. I liked that there is a course that links meditation to success in therapy." A.B. (Dec. 2022)

"The presenters had great knowledge of the subject matter." A.W. (Dec. 2022)

"Clear information." Q.X. (Dec. 2022)

"I liked the meditative techniques to help reduce anxiety and stress during tx sessions. The way to write goals and measurements utilizing meditative techniques was beneficial." D.P. (Nov. 2022)

"Real practical information. Love the holistic approaches to help therapy outcomes." L.W. (Nov. 2022)

"Mindfulness techniques to calm the body and increase focus were good. I liked all the articles reviewed." B.M. (Oct. 2022)

"I liked the meditation techniques for specific disorders and how to write goals for using these techniques." L.H. (Oct. 2022)

"I liked the evidence for benefits of meditation and experiencing the sample practices." R.W. (Sept. 2022)

"Sharing research from a variety of populations and the benefits of mindfulness was good. I liked the 4,7,8 breathing technique." M.K. (Aug. 2022)

"I liked everything about the course. The use of meditation with Voice and Fluency patients was beneficial for my practice." A.S. (July 2022)

"Learning that meditation has many benefits for Speech and Language Therapy applications. And learning meditation techniques for my patients and myself." B.D. (July 2022)

"I liked that the presenters provided sample documentation goals for language, dysfluency, and voice. They explained that there are possible applications to dysarthria. They provided research, websites, apps, and a Speech-Language Pathology Facebook group for further information." B.D. (July 2022)

"Learning specific research relating to benefits of meditation on cognitive domains, and how to actually write goals and notes for these domains. Learning ways to incorporate these ideas into existing goal frameworks. And learning that meditation can be the goal, or the modality for the goal." K.R. (June 2022)

"I liked the ways to address specific goals while using meditation techniques." Q.F. (June 2022)

"I treat mostly voice and pvfm, so application to techniques in this population was helpful. I liked the comprehensive review of research in areas discussed." M.J. (June 2022)

"I liked the evidence and research for application of mindfulness, and how to write appropriate goals." K.C. (Apr. 2022)

"The presenters provided actual goals and defined areas to apply the techniques. The resources and evidence-based information was also critical to be able to use the techniques without fear of being denied payment." K.C. (Apr. 2022)

"Learning to use breathing to re-focus attention." I.K. (Mar. 2022)

"Liked the application of practice to different areas of speech and language, as well as demonstrations of how to do some during therapy. Good list of resources." T.S. (Feb. 2022)

"I liked the research that provided evidence that meditation and breathing has a statistically significant positive impact on those studied. And learning how to write goals to incorporate meditation and breathing practices." S.M. (Jan. 2022)

"The speech and fluency topic as well as the therapeutic presence topics were most helpful to me." L.L. (Jan. 2022)

"Across the board relevance to multiple speech and language disorders." J.R. (Dec. 2021)

"I liked the application of mindfulness to therapy goals – loved the examples." K.L. (Dec. 2021)

“Good presenters and documented research to back up claims.” R.P. (Dec. 2021)

“I'm a huge fan of meditation, so I loved hearing all the research about how beneficial it is.” A.B. (Nov. 2021)

“I loved how the presenters used so many learning methods and intertwining real practice with how you would state goals and treatments. They also provided notes for presenting with real EBP to back up everything.” D.F. (Oct. 2021)

"The Effects of Meditation on the Body and the Effects of Meditation on the Brain is good information for my daily practice. I liked the application of MBSR to various speech-language and cognitive therapies as well as the resources provided at the end for ongoing meditation practice." L.T. (Oct. 2021)

" Examples of treatments and how to utilize them in treatments with patients of varied diagnoses was helpful for my daily practice.  Examples of many meditation treatments and studies to support it were good." P.M. (Aug. 2021)

“Mindfulness as a therapy practice is a new concept to me but one that I think will be hugely beneficial in my practice. I liked the instruction was clear and concise.” T.W. (Aug. 2021)

“I found it very interesting the types of practices found useful for various issues of speech, language, and cognition. I liked how meditation techniques could be utilized to address a variety of speech and language goals.” H.W. (Jul. 2021)

"The research on meditation and executive function, stuttering and language therapy were great for my daily practice.  I liked how the presenters gave practical mindfulness activities to weave into therapy sessions." M.D. (Jul. 2021)

" This course helped me with a client who has been avoiding tasks. I want to try to see if Meditation will help.  It reminded me of voice therapy and a technique to decrease tension in the larynx." T.E. (Jun. 2021)

"All of it was beneficial. I found the information on previous research and the recommendations for general application to be very helpful. It was a topic I was unfamiliar with, and now I feel confident in starting to integrate it in my sessions. I really found it to be a great course overall." C.P. (May 2021)

"I very much appreciated the practical applications in tx along with the goal/documentation examples. More than anything, walking me through the breathing techniques helps me understand and teach more effectively. I liked the functional examples of walking me through it and the evidence based research to support them!" E.B. (Apr. 2021)

"It is nice to hear about alternative strategies to help patients. The speakers were very knowledgeable." A.M. (Mar. 2021)

“The information on how to incorporate mindfulness into goals within the context of our practice was excellent!” E.B. (Mar. 2021)

“I have been meditating for a long time and have used some basic strategies with patients and appreciated the research backing this.” J.C. (Jan. 2021)

"Finally, a course that cites work relating meditation/yoga/pranayama to what we do as SLPs and explains the importance of use to manage anxiety, etc."  L.J. (Jan. 2021)

"I now have a better understanding of how I can use meditation to assist my practice. I liked the demonstration and documentation examples. Everything was great!" A.S. (Jan. 2021)

Course Objectives

  • Review the science suggesting that meditation and breath work can result in positive effects on the brain, body and mind.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge to apply evidence-based mindfulness techniques to the treatment of speech, language, cognitive and voice therapy in the adult population.
  • Learn how to incorporate these techniques into goal writing and documentation across each domain of treatment.

Northern Speech Services is an AOTA Approved Provider of professional development. Course approval #30635. This eCourse is offered at 0.15 CEUs, educational level Intermediate, 1. Domain of OT: Areas of Occupation: Social Participation; Performance Skills: Emotional Regulation, Cognition 2. OT Process: Intervention: Develop & Implement intervention plan; Outcomes: Occupational performance, QoL, Health & Wellness. The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

Presenter & Disclosures

Jennifer llado, ms, ccc-slp.

meditation speech

Jennifer Llado, MS, CCC-SLP, is a Director of Rehabilitation in a long-term acute care hospital in the Boston area.  She is also the founder of Bright Side Therapy, LLC, which produces innovative speech therapy materials for adults.  Jennifer is the co-author of Mindful Healthcare:  20 Brief Exercises To Get in the Zone with Your Patients .  She holds an MS in both Speech-Language Pathology and Leadership specializing in Health Management. She is a graduate of the first ASHA Leadership Development program in 2012.   Jennifer is passionate about alternative health care practices and is certified in Reiki and clinical aromatherapy.  She is dedicated to bringing consciousness to healthcare and leadership.  

Speaker Disclosures:

Financial  — Jennifer Llado is a presenter of online CE courses sponsored by Northern Speech Services; receives royalties.

Financial  — Jennifer Llado is the founder of Bright Side Therapy, LLC; receives a salary.

Financial  — Jennifer Llado is the co-author of Mindful Healthcare:  20 Brief Exercises To Get In The Zone With Your Patients; receives royalties.

Nonfinancial  — Jennifer Llado has no relevant nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Brenda Lovette, MS, CCC-SLP

meditation speech

Brenda Lovette, MS, CCC-SLP, delivers holistic patient-centered treatment in a variety of settings including the Concussion Clinic at Emerson Hospital in Concord Massachusetts, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, and through her private practice, Healthy Expression: Holistic Speech-Language Pathology. She holds an MS in Speech-Language Pathology from UNC Chapel Hill. She is a certified holistic health coach, Reiki practitioner, and registered yoga instructor.

Financial  — Brenda Lovette is a presenter of online CE courses sponsored by Northern Speech Services; receives royalties.

Nonfinancial  — Brenda Lovette has no relevant nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

Intended Audience/Accreditation

asha ce approved provider

This program is offered for 0.15 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level; Professional Area).

meditation speech

Intended Audience

ASHA CEUs: NSS online courses are registered with ASHA and are offered for ASHA CEUs. The number of ASHA CEUs is noted above. Note that 0.1 ASHA CEU = 1 contact hour = equals 1 CEE.

ASHA CE Registry: During the enrollment process, if you select to receive ASHA credit for this course and if you provide your ASHA number, NSS will automatically submit your CEU information to the ASHA CE Registry after successful course completion (80% on post test). This submission happens once per month, during the first week of the month. For example, if you complete your course on November 7th, NSS will submit all November online course CEUs to ASHA during the first week of December. When ASHA inputs the information into their database, they will mark the course as completed on the last day of the month in which it was completed, so November 30th using this example. The certificate of completion available for you to print immediately, however, will reflect the actual completion date, November 7th in this example. Due to ASHA processing procedures please allow 2-3 weeks, from the submission date, for the course to appear on your ASHA transcript.

  • Current ASHA Member
  • ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) Holder
  • Licensed by a state or provincial regulatory agency to practice speech-language pathology (SLP) or audiology
  • Credentialed by a state regulatory agency to practice SLP or audiology
  • Credentialed by a national regulatory agency to practice SLP or audiology
  • Engaged in a Clinical Fellowship under the supervision of an individual with their ASHA CCC
  • Currently enrolled in a masters or doctoral program in SLP or audiology

If an attendee is not an ASHA member or CCC holder but meets any of the above criteria, they may inform the ASHA CE Registry of their eligibility by visiting this site .

Additional accrediting agencies by which Northern Speech is an approved CE provider:

  • California: NSS is approved as a provider of continuing education by the California Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology Board. Provider #PDP4. Online CEU limits may apply; please contact SLPAHADB for current online CEU acceptance policies.
  • Iowa: NSS is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Iowa Board of Speech Pathology and Audiology Examiners. Provider #169.
  • Kansas: NSS is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Provider #LTS-S0005.
  • Florida: NSS is approved as a provider of continuing education by the Florida Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Board. Provider #SPA-026.

Frequently Asked Questions

Online course faq — click here, customer support: please phone 888.337.3866 or email [email protected] ..

Course Completion Timeframe:

You have unlimited time to complete our online courses. You may log off and log on as often as you’d like to in order to complete all sections of a course.

However, completion dates are based on Eastern Standard Time. Therefore, if you need your CEUs by a certain date, be sure to complete the course test before 11:59pm EST on that date. For example, if you need CEUs before January 1st, you will need to complete the course test before 11:59pm EST on December 31st.

Content Access:

Access to course materials and content does not expire, even after completing the post test. You may continue to review course material by logging into your NSS account, clicking the My Online Courses tab, and then viewing your desired course.

Certificate of Completion:

On successful completion of the post test (80%), a certificate will be immediately available for download and/or printing. This certificate will include your name, date of completion (based on Eastern Time Zone, USA/Canada), and number of contact hours (CEUs / CEEs). Please note that CEUs are awarded on the date of successful test completion, not the date of course enrollment. Please ensure that you successfully complete the post test prior to any licensure renewal dates.

ASHA CE Registry Submission:

During the enrollment process, if you select to receive ASHA credit for this course and if you provide your ASHA number, NSS will automatically submit your CEU information to the ASHA CE Registry after successful course completion (80% on post test). This submission happens once per month, during the first week of the month. For example, if you complete your course on November 7th, NSS will submit all November online course CEUs to ASHA during the first week of December. When ASHA inputs the information into their database, they will mark the course as completed on the last day of the month in which it was completed, so November 30th using this example. The certificate of completion available for you to print immediately, however, will reflect the actual completion date, November 7th in this example. Due to ASHA processing procedures please allow 2-3 weeks, from the submission date, for the course to appear on your ASHA transcript.

Purchase Orders:

Purchase orders are currently not accepted for online orders, if you wish to submit a purchase order please do so at [email protected]  or fax to 888-696-9655.

What is an Online Course?

Our Online Courses consist of video, audio, and/or text content and are offered for ASHA CEUs. Unlike a webinar, which requires participants to be logged on and at a computer at specific times, our Online Courses are available to you at any time, from any device, via your NorthernSpeech.com online account. You may work at your own pace and start and stop your course as you wish. Your course will conclude with a short post test. On successful completion of the post test (>80%), a printable certificate of completion is presented to you.

Receiving CEUs:

Northern Speech is an ASHA CE Provider and our online courses are registered with ASHA and offered for ASHA CEUs. Please note that successful completion of the online post test is required prior to the awarding of CEUs. Please contact your state licensing board for acceptance policies related to CEUs earned online. Please note that courses offered for university students are not applicable for CEUs.

Registering for an online course:

You may browse all online courses by clicking the Continuing Education tab above, then Online Courses. Once you find a course, click Enroll Now, and you will be asked to either log into your existing Northern Speech account or create a new online account. Once you’ve entered your account information and provided your credit card payment, your course will be immediately available to you.

Accessing your purchased course or returning to a purchased course:

You will be able to access your online course by logging into your Northern Speech account and then clicking the My Online Courses tab on your profile screen. Click the course you would like to start or to resume. From there, proceed through the course sections until you are ready to complete the post test. You do not have to complete your course all at once. You may log on and off as you wish.

Testing requirements:

Each online course concludes with a post test consisting of multiple choice or true & false questions. Scores of 80% or greater are required for successful course completion and awarding of CEUs. You may revisit course materials and retest as needed to achieve a passing score.

Number of CEUs offered:

We offer courses from 1 to 21 contact hours. Each course will note the number of CEUs offered. Please note that 0.1 CEU = 1 contact hour = 1 CEE.

State licensing boards and online CEUs:

NSS is an ASHA CE Provider and most state licensing boards DO accept ASHA CEUs earned online (usually classified as home-study credits). Some boards do, however, place a limit to the number of CEUs that can be earned via home study/online courses. For the most current information, we suggest that you contact your licensing board or agency to verify acceptance policies and/or any CEU limits related to home-study courses prior to enrolling in an online course.

Course formats:

Our course formats include: text, audio, video, and PowerPoint with author narration. Each course will note the format on the course description page. Most courses include closed captioning.

Course handouts:

Most of our online courses provide a link to download the accompanying handout as a PDF file. 

Group discounts:

Groups of 3 or more are eligible for a 20% discount on each registration on most of our online courses. To receive this discount, registrations need to be processed together via the "Group Rates" tab on the Online Course of your choice.

Computer requirements:

For our online courses to function best, we recommend that you update your computer to include the newest version of your Internet browser (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Edge, Internet Explorer, etc.) and newest version of your computer's operating system. Also a high-speed Internet connection is recommended (cable or DSL). Speakers or headphones will be required for many of our courses as many contain audio components.

Course Cancellation Policy:

A purchased online course can be exchanged, refunded, or transferred to another individual if contact is made with NSS (via phone or email) within 30 days of purchase and the course materials have not been viewed or downloaded. 

Special Needs:

Please click here for any special needs requests, and we will do our best to accommodate them. 

|  Contact Us  |

More Offerings by: Jennifer Llado

#e249 integrating mindfulness techniques into pediatric speech-language pathology.

This course will explore the use of meditation and mindfulness practices for the direct application to pediatric speech-language pathology. Specific techniques will be discussed and demonstrated for integration into clinical practice. 

Add to Cart --> More Info

More Offerings by: Brenda Lovette

Become a peer reviewer to take courses for free, nss email alerts.

Northern Speech Services 325 Meecher Rd. Gaylord, MI 49735

888-337-3866 or 989-732-3866 888-696-9655 or 989-732-6164 Our Office Hours: Mon–Fri 9am - 5pm Eastern Time USA

English Summary

2 Minute Speech On Meditation In English

Good morning to everyone in this room. I would like to thank the principal, the teachers, and my dear friends for allowing me to speak to you today about meditation. The deliberate, methodical practice of relaxing and concentrating one’s attention is called meditation.

Since ancient times, meditation has been a part of many different religious practices and ideologies. A common aspect of meditation is an interior focus, such as on one item (such as one’s breathing), a sound, or a mantra.

There are many different ways to meditate. Meditation practices that emphasize relaxation, concentration, awareness, imagery, attention, or mantra can target many areas of the mind and body (silently repeated words or sounds). It is possible to create an emotional state during meditation and then analyze it, such as rage, hatred, or sadness, or you may focus it on something specific, like light.

A mantra repetition and closure of the eyelids are further meditation techniques. The mantra is chosen according to how well it suits the practitioner, like in Japa yoga, which centers meditation on a certain syllable, concept, breathing technique, or visualization.

The practice of meditation has been linked to several advantageous outcomes. Studies have proven that meditation helps people focus and concentrate better, control their anger, lose weight, etc. 

It has been demonstrated that meditation reduces stress, anxiety, fear, and other negative emotions. When someone has high levels of stress and anxiety, it can be very helpful. People with low empathy levels have reported higher levels of empathy after practicing meditation. This is because it makes individuals more self-aware and less inclined to harshly condemn others. Thank you.

Related Posts:

  • Of Friendship Essay | Summary by Francis Bacon
  • The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Poem By Thomas Stearns Eliot Summary, Notes And Line By Line Analysis In English
  • Lady Of Shalott Poem By Alfred Lord Tennyson Summary, Notes And Line By Line Analysis In English
  • Common Conversational Phrases in English [List of 939]
  • Howl Poem By Allen Ginsberg Summary, Notes and Line by Line Explanation in English
  • Random Phrase Generator [English]

Jeremy Gutsche Innovation Keynote Speaker

The Power of Meditation

Storytelling in Social Justice

meditation speech

Get inspired by 4,000+ keynote speaker videos & our founder, a top keynote speaker on innovation .

Jennifer Hartman's Speech About Meditation Aims to Enhance Self-Control

Finding Self-Acceptance

Home

  • Website Inauguration Function.
  • Vocational Placement Cell Inauguration
  • Media Coverage.
  • Certificate & Recommendations
  • Privacy Policy
  • Science Project Metric
  • Social Studies 8 Class
  • Computer Fundamentals
  • Introduction to C++
  • Programming Methodology
  • Programming in C++
  • Data structures
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Object Oriented Concepts
  • Database Management Systems
  • Open Source Software
  • Operating System
  • PHP Tutorials
  • Earth Science
  • Physical Science
  • Sets & Functions
  • Coordinate Geometry
  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Statics and Probability
  • Accountancy
  • Business Studies
  • Political Science
  • English (Sr. Secondary)

Hindi (Sr. Secondary)

  • Punjab (Sr. Secondary)
  • Accountancy and Auditing
  • Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology
  • Automobile Technology
  • Electrical Technology
  • Electronics Technology
  • Hotel Management and Catering Technology
  • IT Application
  • Marketing and Salesmanship
  • Office Secretaryship
  • Stenography
  • Hindi Essays
  • English Essays

Letter Writing

  • Shorthand Dictation

Essay, Paragraph or Speech on “Meditation” Complete English Essay, Speech for Class 10, Class 12 and Graduation and other classes.

Meditation 

Meditation is the practice of thinking deeply in silence, in order to make the mind calm. Through regular mediation, levels of stress can be reduced as well as managed. Meditation is a relaxation technique like yoga and deep breathing that activates the body’s relaxation response. When meditation is practiced regularly, it leads to decrease in our stress levels in everyday life. Meditation gives a boost in our feelings of happiness and calmness. It increases our ability to stay cool, calm and composed under pressure.

Effective meditation is free from any kind of other distraction. Research has shown that meditation has benefits on mental health, including decrease in depression, increase in positive emotional state and increases in the ability to deal with unavoidable stressful conditions in life. Meditation not only involves relaxation but also the active growth of positive mental states such as affection, kindness, sympathy, tolerance and energy.

The benefits of meditation are many. Meditation also helps in increasing creative levels of mind. While practicing meditation, our heart rate and breathing slows down, blood pressure becomes normal, sweating becomes less and oxygen can be used more efficiently. Moreover, our immune system functions well. In short, meditation is magnificent and effective in temporary stress reduction and long-term health. A clear and peaceful state of mind can be achieved through this practice. Meditation increases positive thinking, attention levels and awareness to reduce stress. Thus, meditation should be suggested as a treatment for the prevention of many stress-related conditions.

A study carded out by the Professor of medicine at Harvard University, arrived to the conclusion that meditation alters the chemistry of the brain and increases positive emotions. Statistics have shown that meditation has improved lifestyles of people suffering from stress-related conditions. People living in a big city suffering from continuous pain, hypertension, anxiety and depression can be trained to do meditation. Positive effects can be seen soon among them.

To conclude, meditation should be recommended to patients suffering from conditions caused by stress. Doctors and scientists are working to observe the effects of meditation practiced by people who are undergoing stressful situations. It should be noted that many prestigious Universities such as Harvard have made their best efforts in carrying out their researches on meditation and without a doubt, the results are positive. Meditation is an important tool to cope up with stress-related situations. Moreover, through meditation, one can turn to the internal peace to calm down the discomforts caused by stressful experiences of life.

About evirtualguru_ajaygour

meditation speech

commentscomments

' src=

Hello everyone hope you all are fine if you want to ask a question please ask to call me on this number 9582160779

' src=

What are the importance of the meditation

' src=

I Just Started Meditated It Helps Me Alot Ima Start Doing It Alot More Now.

' src=

Oh; i also think it

' src=

A lovely, inspiring article. I could read it again and again.

' src=

I am helpful to this

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Quick Links

meditation speech

Popular Tags

Visitors question & answer.

  • Pooja Jain on CBSE ASL “Listening Test Worksheet” (ASL) 2017 for Class 10, Listening Test Audio Script 1
  • Suraj yadav on Write a letter to your brother advising him to avoid bad company and study well. English Letter for Class 9, 10 and 12 Students.
  • Siya on Download “Beauty And Wellness – Code 807” Previous Year Question Paper with Answers of Class 12 NSQF Vocational, CBSE Session 2021-2022.
  • Sanvi sharma on Hindi Essay on “Vidya dhan sabse bada dhan he” , ”विद्या-धन सबसे बड़ा धन है” Complete Hindi Essay for Class 10, Class 12 and Graduation and other classes.

Download Our Educational Android Apps

Get it on Google Play

Latest Desk

  • Reservation Policy a Potential Danger – Social Issue Essay, Article for Class 12, Graduation and Competitive Examination.
  • Privatisation of Public Sector in India – Social Issue Essay, Article for Class 12, Graduation and Competitive Examination.
  • New Trend in India’s Foreign Trade – Social Issue Essay, Article for Class 12, Graduation and Competitive Examination.
  • Information Technology for Education – Social Issue Essay, Article for Class 12, Graduation and Competitive Examination.
  • Sanskrit Diwas “संस्कृत दिवस” Hindi Nibandh, Essay for Class 9, 10 and 12 Students.
  • Nagrik Suraksha Diwas – 6 December “नागरिक सुरक्षा दिवस – 6 दिसम्बर” Hindi Nibandh, Essay for Class 9, 10 and 12 Students.
  • Jhanda Diwas – 25 November “झण्डा दिवस – 25 नवम्बर” Hindi Nibandh, Essay for Class 9, 10 and 12 Students.
  • NCC Diwas – 28 November “एन.सी.सी. दिवस – 28 नवम्बर” Hindi Nibandh, Essay for Class 9, 10 and 12 Students.
  • Example Letter regarding election victory.
  • Example Letter regarding the award of a Ph.D.
  • Example Letter regarding the birth of a child.
  • Example Letter regarding going abroad.
  • Letter regarding the publishing of a Novel.

Vocational Edu.

  • English Shorthand Dictation “East and Dwellings” 80 and 100 wpm Legal Matters Dictation 500 Words with Outlines.
  • English Shorthand Dictation “Haryana General Sales Tax Act” 80 and 100 wpm Legal Matters Dictation 500 Words with Outlines meaning.
  • English Shorthand Dictation “Deal with Export of Goods” 80 and 100 wpm Legal Matters Dictation 500 Words with Outlines meaning.
  • English Shorthand Dictation “Interpreting a State Law” 80 and 100 wpm Legal Matters Dictation 500 Words with Outlines meaning.

IMAGES

  1. Best Motivational Meditation Speech For Healing

    meditation speech

  2. 65+ Meditation Quotes And Sayings

    meditation speech

  3. meditation speech listen this video improve your life

    meditation speech

  4. Subliminal Speech Meditation

    meditation speech

  5. Outline Meditation speech

    meditation speech

  6. Free Guided Meditation Scripts Pdf

    meditation speech

COMMENTS

  1. Mindful Speech

    Here's a Sample of the " Mindful Speech " Guided Meditation Script: One of the most important ways to free ourselves from suffering is to be mindful in how we speak. Yes, this means not criticizing unnecessarily, gossiping, or being unkind. But taking a step back, it can also be viewed as how we communicate with other beings.

  2. A Guided Meditation On Right Speech

    Practicing right speech reduces harm, and creates the karma for us to be listened to, trusted and heard. In this intermediate-level guided meditation, we bring awareness to the tenets of right speech, contemplating what each feels like in our body, especially at the throat chakra. Practice Time: < 10 minutes. Purpose: Speak Meaningfully Without ...

  3. What 7000 HOURS of MEDITATION Looks Like

    Stream, discover, and download the most popular motivational speeches on Mindset app:iOS: http://bit.ly/UnlockMindsetAndroid: http://bit.ly/MindsetAndroidSub...

  4. Learn How to Meditate: A Mindful Guide to Transform Your Life

    1) Take a seat Find place to sit that feels calm and quiet to you. 2) Set a time limit If you're just beginning, it can help to choose a short time, such as five or 10 minutes. 3) Notice your body You can sit in a chair with your feet on the floor, you can sit loosely cross-legged, you can kneel—all are fine.

  5. 3 Simple Guided Meditation Scripts for Improving Wellbeing

    3. Compassion meditation. This is a script devised for in-person and online delivery, starting with the same posture guidelines as the above LKM. In addition, it uses the same template based on the four Buddhist Brahma Viharas, which consist of loving-kindness, compassion, appreciative joy, and equanimity.

  6. The 5 Minute Mindfulness Meditation Script

    Five Minute Guided Meditation Script for Relaxation and Tension Release. 1) I'd like you to pause, take a deep breath and place your feet flat on the floor or ground. Really FEEL your feet in contact with the surface underneath you. 2) Now place your hands on your stomach and take 2-3 deep breaths, inhaling through your nose and exhaling ...

  7. Free Audio Resources for Mindfulness Meditation

    Guided audio files for practicing Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) from the UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. Basic meditation with Tara Brach. Free meditations that you can stream or download. Contemplative Mind in Society. Guided practices from Mirabai Bush, the center's director, Diana Winston from UCLA's Mindfulness ...

  8. Right Speech

    Right speech can be very subtle, it's a ground we cultivate in meditation. There are three aspects to every action or speech. There is the intention behind it, there is the skillfulness of the action, and there is the immediate response to the action.

  9. Mindful Speaking

    There's a Buddhist saying that states: "When meditating, watch your mind. When in the world, watch your words.". Being mindful of what we say is as important as being aware of what goes on in the mind. In fact, some aspects of the mind do not reveal themselves until we talk. By becoming aware of what motivates our speaking we can discover ...

  10. Benefits of Practicing Mindfulness of Speech (Teachings)

    Practicing points of mindful speech include staying silent as necessary. The old adage to remain quiet if you can't find anything nice to say is the practice of mindful responsiveness. To improve mindfulness of speech, meditation is helpful. A stable, more spacious mind helps us to slow down and observe what is arising.

  11. Guided Meditation Scripts

    This body image relaxation script is a guided meditation focused on self-acceptance and self-image. Our own self-talk can contribute to the pain and low self-esteem that is sometimes associated with rejection or failure. This relaxation script will help you to identify and change upsetting thoughts.

  12. Meditation: Take a stress-reduction break wherever you are

    Meditation is a type of mind-body complementary medicine. Meditation can help you relax deeply and calm your mind. During meditation, you focus on one thing. You get rid of the stream of thoughts that may be crowding your mind and causing stress. This process can lead to better physical and emotional well-being.

  13. LISTEN EVERY DAY! Guided Meditation for Success, Wealth and ...

    Listen to his before you start your day and before you go to bed! Guided meditation for success, wealth and happiness! Subscribe to Pete's YouTube channel: h...

  14. How to Use Meditation to Improve Your Public Speaking

    World-class public speakers generally have a few traits in common. They're relaxed on stage. They're spontaneous and often interact with the audience during their speech. They're expressive and bright; the audience often feels uplifted, inspired or moved after the speech. They know how to flow on stage. While much of this comes with practice, meditation…

  15. To Persuade Speech: How Meditation Improves Health

    Transcribed from a speech originally delivered on April 11, 2018. In 2004, ABC News anchor Dan Harris suffered a panic attack on live TV. ... Many adults benefit from learning to manage or reduce stress through meditation. The solution is that meditation helps reduce the impacts of stressors on our physical, mental, and behavioral well-being.

  16. Mindfulness of Speech by Donald Rothberg

    A talk on mindfulness of speech by Donald Rothberg: This evening is a theme that really continues from last night. And the theme for this evening is speech practice and mindfulness looking at a number of different forms of mindfulness practice that really are part of, or contribute, to our speech practice. And I'll invite us all, just like I ...

  17. Speech on Importance Of Yoga And Meditation

    1-minute Speech on Importance Of Yoga And Meditation. Good day, friends. Let's talk about two great treasures in our lives - yoga and meditation. They are like two best friends who help us stay healthy and happy. Yoga is not just about bending or twisting our bodies in different shapes. It's a way to make our bodies strong, flexible, and ...

  18. What meditation can do for your mind, mood, and health

    Walking meditation turns your focus to both body and mind as you breathe in time with your footsteps. Lennihan suggests trying different types of meditation classes to see which technique best suits you. "Meditating with a group of people is a much more powerful experience, and having a teacher talk you through the technique will make it much ...

  19. ‎Wake Me Up: Morning Meditation and Motivation: Morning Motivational

    This morning, fuel your passion for life with this motivational speech for positive energy. Clear your mind for the day and set a positive intention to do your best.

  20. 1 Minute Speech on Meditation In English

    Wikipedia defines the term 'meditation' to be "a practice in which an individual uses a technique - such as mindfulness, or focusing the mind on a particular object, thought, or activity - to train attention and awareness, and achieve a mentally clear and emotionally calm and stable state.". There are several benefits that accompany ...

  21. Meditation Techniques For Speech Therapy

    There is increasing scientific evidence that meditation and breath work practices have the potential to improve the structure and function of the brain. This course will review the literature and discuss evidence-based ways to incorporate mindfulness practices into your speech, language, cognitive and voice therapy with the adult population.

  22. 2 Minute Speech On Meditation In English

    2 Minute Speech On Meditation In English. Good morning to everyone in this room. I would like to thank the principal, the teachers, and my dear friends for allowing me to speak to you today about meditation. The deliberate, methodical practice of relaxing and concentrating one's attention is called meditation.

  23. The Power of Meditation : speech about meditation

    Jennifer Hartman's Speech About Meditation Aims to Enhance Self-Control. Dr. Jennifer Hartman gave an informative speech about meditation, and how it is able to improve people's moods, habits, and ability to approach conflict and emotion in a way that is reasoned and constructive. In the speech, Dr. Hartman talks about the 2016 news cycle and ...

  24. Essay, Paragraph or Speech on "Meditation" Complete English Essay

    Essay, Paragraph or Speech on "Meditation" Complete English Essay, Speech for Class 10, Class 12 and Graduation and other classes. Meditation Meditation is the practice of thinking deeply in silence, in order to make the mind calm. Through regular mediation, levels of stress can be reduced as well as managed. Meditation is a relaxation ...