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Structural Engineering

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PhD in Civil Engineering with Concentration in Structural Engineering and Structural Mechanics

The Graduate Handbook for the Department describes official degree requirements, residency, rules on transfer of courses, etc. In addition to the general information provided here, please refer to sections of the Graduate Handbook for the Structures Program available in PDF format at the CEE Handbooks web page.

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  • Growing Demand Over Next 10 Years for Professors
  • 25-50% of Domestic PhD Students Enter Academia
  • Substantial Salary Increase Compared to MS Degree
  • Typically Requires 3 Years Additional Study Beyond MS Degree

PhD Road Map

  • 8 graded courses total beyond MS
  • Only 2 of the 8 units may be taken from the MS core of CEE (470, 462, 463, 472, 471, 570)
  • 4 of the 8 units must be at the 500 level
  • Students often enroll in a variety of courses in other departments (CS, MATH, MATSE, MIE, STAT)
  • Students must enroll in CEE 595S (seminar) every semester
  • Start working on dissertation research
  • Take Qualifying Exam (see details below)
  • Complete remainder of coursework
  • Preliminary Exam to approve dissertation plan
  • Continue research full-time, attend conferences, write technical papers, complete dissertation
  • Take Final Examination on dissertation research

Qualifying Examination

  • Students must pass a written Qualifying Exam for admission to PhD Candidacy in the structures program
  • Analysis of truss and frame structures
  • Structural dynamics
  • Structural mechanics
  • Concrete structures
  • Steel Structures
  • A password protected archive of prior QE sample problems may be downloaded  here  (the password may be obtained from the faculty member who is administering the QE examination)
  • Structural engineering PhD students must pass an offering of the Structures Qualifying Exam taken within 16 months of starting their post-MS graduate work
  • The Qualifying Exam is offered in the Fall semester and the Spring semester each academic year
  • Details of the Exam are given at the start of each semester

Structural Engineering

Aerospace ∙ Biological ∙ Civil ∙ Geotechnical ∙ Mechanical

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Doctoral Studies SE75

Se ph.d. degree overview:.

The Ph.D. program is intended to prepare students for a variety of careers in research, teaching and advanced professional practice in the broad sense of structural engineering, encompassing civil and aerospace structures, earthquake and geotechnical engineering, composites, and engineering mechanics. Depending on the student's background and ability, research is initiated as soon as possible.

All students, in consultation with their Faculty Advisors, develop course programs that will prepare them for the Departmental Qualifying Examination and for their dissertation research. However, these programs of study and research must be planned to meet the time limits established to advance to candidacy and to complete the requirements for the degree.

The department also offers a seminar course each quarter dealing with current research topics in Earthquake Engineering (SE 290). Ph.D. students must complete three quarters of SE 290 prior to the DQE to meet graduation requirements, and it is strongly recommended to take it for at least one quarter in every subsequent year.

Download Academic Planning Form

Doctoral Examinations:

A Structural Engineering Ph.D. student is required to pass three examinations.

Download the Department Qualifying Exam Guide

The Department Qualifying Examination (DQE) which should be taken within three to six quarters of full-time graduate study (1st year-2nd year), requires a 3.5 GPA. This examination is intended to determine the student’s ability to successfully pursue a research project at a level appropriate for the doctoral degree.

It is administered by one faculty member for each focus sequence, two of whom must be in Structural Engineering.

The student is responsible for material pertaining to four focus areas. One focus area can be satisfied by course work, provided that all courses in that area have been taken at UCSD, the grade in each course is B or better, and the overall GPA in that area is at least 3.5. It consists of 12 courses (48 units). 

In order to insure appropriate breadth, the focus areas should consist of the following:

(a) two focus areas within Structural Engineering which are closely related to the student's research interests (3 courses for each focus area)

(b) one focus area within Structural Engineering that is not directly related to the student’s area of research (3 courses)

(c) one minor focus area outside the Department of Structural Engineering. Minor areas too closely related to the major areas will not be approved by the SE Graduate Affairs Committee (3 courses). The Solid Mechanics Focus Sequence, which is jointly taught by the Department of Structural Engineering and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, cannot be used to satisfy the outside Structural Engineering requirement.

Sample courses: 

SE Focus Area 1: 3 courses

SE Focus Area 2: 3 courses 

Breadth Focus Area: 3 courses

Non-SE Focus Area: 3 courses

An update list of focus areas for Ph.D. students is available in the Structural Engineering Graduate Handbook . Students intending to specialize in the emerging areas of structural health monitoring, damage prognosis, and validated simulations are advised to take courses in the focus areas of Advanced Structural Behavior and elective courses MAE 283, MAE 261, ECE 251AN, ECE 251BN, ECE 254, and CSE 291 which can be used to satisfy the outside Structural Engineering requirement.

Since the examination areas must be approved by the Structural Engineering Graduate Affairs Committee, students are advised to seek such approval well before their expected examination date, preferably while planning their graduate studies. Although students are not required to take particular courses in preparation for the Departmental Qualifying Examination, the scope of the examination in each area is associated with a set of three graduate courses, generally in focus areas offered or approved by the department. A candidate can develop a sense of the level of knowledge expected to be demonstrated during the examination by studying the appropriate syllabi and/or discussing the course content with faculty experienced in teaching the courses involved. The Departmental Qualifying Examination may be a written or an oral examination, at the discretion of the committee.

Doctoral students who have passed the Departmental Qualifying Examination may take any course for an S/U grade, with the exception of any course that the student's Departmental Qualifying or Ph.D. Candidacy Examination Committee stipulates must be taken in order to remove a deficiency. It is strongly recommended that all Structural Engineering graduate students take a minimum of two courses (other than research) per academic year after passing the Departmental Qualifying Examination.

Download the Advancement to Candidacy Exam Guide

The Advancement to Candidacy Senate Examination is the second examination required of Structural Engineering doctoral students. In preparation for the Ph.D. Candidacy Examination, students must have completed the Departmental Qualifying Examination and the Departmental Teaching Experience requirement, obtained a faculty research advisor, have identified a topic for their dissertation research, and have made initial progress in that research.

Mentorship and Teaching Experience is required of all Structural Engineering Ph.D. students prior to the Dissertation Defense. The Mentorship and Teaching experience can be satisfied by lecturing one hour per week in either a problem-solving section or laboratory session, for one quarter in an undergraduate course, as designated by the Department. The requirement can be fulfilled by Teaching Assistant service or by undertaking a structured teaching training program for academic credit (through SE 501 and in consultation with the course instructor that quarter). This requirement can also be satisfied by serving as a research mentor to a team of undergraduate or graduate students in a structured, 10-week, environment. Students must contact the Graduate Student Affairs Office in the Department to plan and obtain approval for completion of this requirement.

The committee members should be selected by the student and their faculty advisor.

The committee must consist of 4 members composed of the following:                            

Example 1 SE Faculty Advisor (Committee Chair) SE Faculty Outside SE Faculty (within UCSD) Outside SE Faculty (within UCSD) (At least one of the committee members must be tenured or emeritus)

Example 2 SE Faculty Advisor (Committee Chair) SE Faculty SE Faculty Outside SE Faculty (within UCSD) (At least one of the committee members must be tenured or emeritus)

The committee must include at least one tenured or emeritus member and at least one member from outside the student's major department. For questions concerning the committee, email the Graduate Academic Advisor or see the Graduate Division website for  Appointment of the Doctoral Committee .

If the committee does not issue a unanimous report on the examination, the Dean of Graduate Division shall be called upon to review and present the case for resolution to the Graduate Council, which shall determine appropriate action.

The committee conducts the Ph.D. Candidacy Examination in an oral examination, during which students must demonstrate the ability to engage in dissertation research. This involves the presentation of a plan for the dissertation research project. A short written document, such as an abstract, describing the research plan must be submitted to each member of the committee at least two weeks before the Ph.D. Candidacy Examination. This requirement can also be met by meeting with the doctoral committee members to discuss the nature of the student’s dissertation research. The committee may ask questions directly or indirectly related to the research project and general questions that it determines to be relevant. Upon successful completion of this examination, students are advanced to candidacy and are awarded the Candidate in the Doctor of Philosophy designation.  

The preferred means to conduct the qualifying exam is when all committee members are physically present. Graduate Council, however, has determined that a doctoral committee member can participate in one of three ways: 1) physically present (meaning they are in the room), 2) telepresent (meaning they participate by live video teleconference), or 3) in advance (if they must be absent on the exam date, it is permissible to examine the candidate in advance of the exam date).

More than half of the doctoral committee must be physically present. No more than two members may be telepresent. The committee chair, or one co-chair, must be physically present. The outside tenured member must be physically present or telepresent. If an emergency situation arises that affects the number of committee members present, the committee chair (or co-chairs) may decide how to proceed. There must be sufficient expertise among present members (either physically or telepresent) to examine the student.

Download the PhD Final Defense Exam Guide

phd topics in structural engineering

The Dissertation Final Defense is the final Ph.D. examination.  Please visit the Preparing to Graduate website. Upon completion of the dissertation research project, the student writes a dissertation that must then be successfully defended in an oral examination and public presentation conducted by the doctoral committee. A complete copy of the student's dissertation must be submitted to each member of the doctoral committee at least three weeks before the defense. While the copy of the dissertation handed to the committee is expected to be complete and in final form, it should be noted that students are expected to make changes in the text per direction of the committee as a result of the defense. The form of the final draft must conform to procedures outlined in the publication. Instructions for the  Preparation and Submission of the Doctoral Dissertation  are located at the provided link. 

Note: There should be  3 quarters between the Advancement to Senate Exam and the Final Defense.  

3 quarters total, which includes the quarter the student officially advances and the quarter they file for graduation. Summer is not included, just the regular academic year.  Just for clarification, if you defend in Winter 2022 then the soonest you would be able to defend is Fall 2022. Again, the earliest would be Fall 2022, as long as you are registered in all three quarters.

The final defense/degree paperwork must be signed by ALL Committee members with a "wet signature." It cannot be scanned. 

The student must make an  appointment  with the Graduate Division Office. The appointment will need to be scheduled prior to defending and will cover formatting of the dissertation and forms required to graduate. 

More information about the Exam Policies can be found on the  Graduate Division Website .

Upon approval by the Dean of Graduate Division, file the dissertation with the university archivist, who accepts it on behalf of the Graduate Council. Acceptance of the dissertation by the archivist, with a subsequent second approval by the Dean of Graduate Division, represents the final step in the completion by the candidate of all requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree. 

Ph.D. Time Limit Policy:

Time limits are set at the end of a Ph.D. student's first year. 

Pre-Candidacy Time Limit  (PCTL) :  Maximum registered time in which a student must advance to doctoral candidacy.  SE Pre-candidacy status is limited to four years. Support Time Limit  (SUTL) : Maximum time during which a doctoral student is eligible for financial support. SE Doctoral students are eligible for university support for six years. Total Registered Time Limit  (TRTL) : Maximum registered time in which a student must complete all doctoral requirements. The defense and submission of the SE doctoral dissertation must be within seven years.​​​​​

More information regarding Time Limits can be found here .

Spring Evaluations:

In the Spring quarter of each year, department faculty members are required to evaluate their doctoral student's overall performance in coursework, research, and prospects for financial support for future years. A written assessment is given to the student after the evaluation. If a student's work is found to be inadequate, the Faculty Advisor may determine that the student cannot continue in the graduate program. 

Faculty Advisor:

Ph.D. students are placed with a Faculty Advisor (also known as research advisor/faculty advisor/PI) when they are admitted into the Ph.D. program. A Faculty Advisor is the academic, research, and program guide for Ph.D. students. Additionally, the Faculty Advisor is the funding PI for their assigned PhD students. The student’s research and academic performance are evaluated on a quarterly basis via an S/U grade in SE 299. Students who receive an ‘U’ in SE 299 will be placed in Probationary Status in the following quarter. The student must communicate with the Faculty Advisor to address any deficiencies and formulate a plan to address issues and deficiencies. Receiving two or more ‘U’s in SE 299 are grounds for dismissal from the student’s research group and/or termination of the Ph.D. program. If Ph.D. students need to change their Faculty Advisor at any time, they have 1 quarter to find a new Faculty Advisor. Upon finding a Faculty Advisor, the Ph.D. students must fill out the Change of Advisor form provided by the Graduate Academic Advisor. There is a Guaranteed Transition Support Program for Ph.D. students in the Jacobs School of Engineering.  The goal of the Guaranteed Transitional Support Program is to support Ph.D. students who find themselves needing a new advisor.  This tool will help Ph.D. students transition to a new advisor in order to successfully continue and complete their degree.

phd topics in structural engineering

  • Research Areas
  • Structural Engineering and Mechanics

Doctoral Programs

Structural Engineering Ph.D.

The Structures PhD Field contains subject matter for dissertation research in the areas of structures, structural engineering, and structural mechanics. The student is responsible for the knowledge contained in required core material and additional subject matter approved by the PhD Structures Field Committee.

Prerequisite Preparation for the Major Field

The following topics, normally completed at the undergraduate level, are considered prerequisite material for this field of study; principles of equilibrium, compatibility and force-displacement relationships for structural elements and systems; work and energy principles, mechanical properties of materials, constitutive equations, elementary theories of vibration and stability, basic concepts of design of steel and reinforced concrete structures. (Courses C&EE 130, 135B, 137, 141 or 142. References: P.1, P.2, P.3, P.4,P.5, P.6, P.7)

Topical Outline of the Structures Major Field

I.   static analysis.

A. (Required) Application to One-Dimensional Structures. Rods, beams, trusses and frames. Fundamental principles: equilibrium, compatibility, force-deflection properties, virtual work, strain energy and complementary strain energy. Matrix methods of analysis. (Course C&EE 235A. References: I.6)

B. Finite Element Analysis of Structures. Systematic formulation of element properties using variational principles. Displacement method, force method and hybrid methods. Interpolation functions and computation aspects. Application of one, two and three dimensional finite elements to beams, membranes, plates and solids. (Course C&EE 235B. References: I.1, I.3, I.5, I.13)

C. Elastic Theory and Two-Dimensional Structures (Plates and Shells). Equations of l linear isotropic elastostatics; two- and three-dimensional problems; torsion and bending. Fundamental principles of plate theory; Kirchoff-Love hypothesis; constitutive equations, equilibrium, compatibility, boundary conditions, boundary value problems; approximate methods, membrane theory of shells, thermoelastic problems; bending theory of cylinders. (Courses: C&EEM 230, 232. References: I.2, I.4, I.7, I.8, I.9, I.10, I.11, I.12)

II.   Dynamic Analysis

A. (Required) Dynamics of Structures. Hamilton’s principle, variational methods. Lagrange;s equations. Free vibration problem, normal modes in discrete and continuous systems. The structural dynamics eigenvalue problem and its solution. application of beam finite elements in structural dynamics. Approximate methods, Rayleight-Ritz, Galerkin and collocation methods. Proportional damping. Normal mode and frequency response methods, response spectra. (Course: C&EE 237A. References: II.2, II.4, II.5, II.7, II.8)

B. Advanced Dynamics of Structures. Nonproportional damping. Structural dynamics of two- and three-dimensional structures using approximate and finite element methods. Computational aspects of the structural dynamics eigenvalue problem. Vibrations of Timoshenko beams. Numerical integration schemes for response calculations. Dynamic modelling using substructures and component mode synthesis. (Course: MAE 269B. References: II.5, II.6)

III.   Design

A. Design of steel structures in accord with AISC specifications. Design of reinforced concrete according to ACI requirements. Design for vertical and lateral loads. Load paths and modes of failure in structures. (Courses: C&EE 141, 142, 143, 144, 147, 241, 242, 244. References: III.3, III.4, III.5, III.7, III.8, III.10)

B. Optimum Structural Design. Formulation of structural optimization problems. Fundamentals of solution techniques: linear and nonlinear mathematical programming; numerical implementation. Application to design of components, trusses, frames. Plastic design. Supplementary or alternate methods of structural optimization: approximation concepts; dual methods and optimality criteria. (Courses: C&EEM 140, M240. References: III.1, III.2, III.6, III.9)

IV.   Earthquake Engineering

A. Response of Structures to Ground Motions. Single and multiple degree of freedom idealizations; numerical methods for solving problems; nonlinear response of singe and multi-degree of freedom systems; earthquake response spectra; reconciliation of measured spectra and building code spectra; combining modal responses with spectra inputs; earthquake response calculations with computer programs. (Courses (C&EE 221 and 246. References: IV.1, IV.3, IV.5, IV.6)

B. Engineering Seismology. Epicenter and fault plane location, source mechanics and fracture mechanics, attenuation, dispersion and diffraction, soil dynamics, and analysis of strong motion data. (Courses: MAE M257B, C&EE 222 and 245. References: IV.2, II.3, IV.4)

V.   Experimental Analysis

A. Experimental methods for determining position, displacement, velocity, stress and strain in structures. Analysis of the limit condition of structures, particularly emphases on fracture mechanics and plasticity. Modal analysis of the structural response of systems to deterministic and nondeterministic loading histories. Computer based testing techniques and analysis, including computer control and computer interactive experiments. (Courses: C&EE 130F, 130L, 137L. 238. References: V.1, V.2, V.3, V.4)

VI.   Stability and Nonlinear Analysis

A. Stability of Structures. Bucking of bars, frames, and trusses. Fundamental concept of buckling, beam-column effects. Buckling as an eigenvalue problem. Energy concepts in stability analysis. The Rayleigh-Ritz method, geometric stiffness matrix. Coupled lateral and torsional buckling effects. Inelastic buckling. Introduction to plate buckling. (Course: C&EE 236. References: VI.4, VI.5)

B. Nonlinear Structural Analysis. Large strain-displacement relations, elasto-plastic behavior of metals and geologic materials, finite element representation of nonlinear solid and structural systems. Numerical solution of nonlinear algebraic equations, implicit and explicit time integration techniques, stability and accuracy of nonlinear solution algorithms. Discrete element systems.(Courses: C&EE 231, 235C. References: VI.1, I.1, VI.2, VI.3)

VII.   Mechanics of Structural Materials

A. Mechanical Behavior of Metals and Polymers. Constitutive relation, deformation maps. Failure criteria, fatigue, corrosion. Fracture mechanics. Viscoelasticity, temperature-time-moisture equivalence. (Courses: C&EE 234 and MAE 256F. References: V.1, V.3)

B. Mechanical Behavior of Frictional materials. Stress-strain and strength behavior of frictional materials such as soils, rock, concrete, and ceramics; effective stress principle; volume change and pore pressure developments as functions of void ratio and confining pressure; compositional and environmental factors affecting the behavior of frictional materials; critical state concepts; three-dimensional behavior. Constitutive modeling, elasto-plastic material models, nonassociated flow, work-hardening plasticity theory, failure criteria, stability and instability of frictional materials. (Courses: C&EE 220 and 229. References: miscellaneous technical reports and papers)

Major Field Requirements

Each student who selected Structures as his or her major field is expected to have a background equivalent to the material contained in the courses listed under prerequisite preparation for the major field. The student is also required to acquire proficiency in the subject matter listed in paragraphs IA and IIA, and in elective subject matter covered in at least xix additional graduate courses listed in this syllabus. The student is expected to acquire this knowledge in at least four of the seven topics contained in the syllabus. Each student must submit to the Departmental Graduate Advisor, a Proposal of Fields of Study for the Ph.D. Degree containing a list of the required subject matter.

Each student in this major field will be required to pass a closed book written examination based on the subject matter contained in the prerequisite courses, C&EE 235A, C&EE 237A, and any three elective graduate courses from her os his major field. The format of the examination is contained in the Appendix. Additional detail are available from the Chair of the Structures Ph.D. Field Committee.

Breadth Requirements

Each student selecting Structures as his/her major field will be held responsible for the body of knowledge contained in two independent PH.D. Minor Fields which complement the Structures Ph.D. Major Field. Each Minor Field is defined by a body of knowledge contained in three courses, at least two of which are at the graduate level. (Fields other than established Minor Fields in the School of Engineering and Applied Science are subject to the approval of the Structures Ph.D. Field Committee.) One of these Minor Fields may be selected from one of the seven topics contained in this Syllabus, provided the selected topical area is clearly distinct from the subject matter specified in the major field. The breadth requirement is satisfied by earning a 3.25 GPA in the courses listed in each of the Minor Fields. The student may petition the Structures Ph.D. Field Committee for permission to show proficiency in a body of knowledge which differs from the above recommended norm.

Minor Field Requirements

A student selecting Structures as his/her Minor Field will be held responsible for the body of knowledge contained in C&EE 235A and C&EE 237A and any other course listed in this Syllabus (including prerequisite courses). Students who select any of the courses listed in the Syllabus to satisfy requirements of a field other than Structures may not use that course as part of the Structures Minor Field. Students who wish to satisfy the Minor Field written examination requirement by grades in courses must achieve at least a 3.25 GPS in the courses used to satisfy Minor Field requirements. Students may petition the Structures PhD Field Committee for permission to show proficiency in a body of knowledge which differs from the above recommended norm.

List of References

Prerequisites.

P.1 Beer, F.P., and Johnston, E.R., Vector Mechanics for Engineers Statics and Dynamics, McGraw-Hill, 1972. P.2 Popov, E.P., Engineering Mechanics of Solids, McGraw-Hill, 1990. P.3 Ferguson, P., Breen, J., and Jirsa, J., Reinforced Concrete Fundamentals,5th Ed, Wiley, 1988. P.4 Norris, C.H., Wilbur, J.B., and Utku, S., Elementary Structural Analysis, McGraw-Hill, 1976. P.5 Salmon, C.G. and Johnson, J.E., Steel Structures: Design and Behavior, Intext Education Publisher, Current Edition. P.6 Timoshenko, S.P., Young, D.H., and Weaver, W., Jr., Vibration Problems in Engineering, Wiley, 1974. P.7 Ugural, A.C. and Fenster, S.K., Advanced Strength and Applied Elasticity, Elsevier, 1981.

I.1 Bathe, K-J. and Wilson, E.L., Numerical Methods in Finite Element Analysis, Prentice Hall, 1976. I.2 Boley, B.O. and Weiner, J.G., Theory of Thermal Stresses, R. E. Krieger, 1985. I.3 Cook, R., Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, 1974. I.4 Flugge, W., Stresses in Shells, Springer Verlag, 1960. I.5 Gallagher, R., Finite Element Analysis, Prentice Hall, 1975. I.6 Ghali, A. and Neville, A.M., Structural Analysis, Third Edition, Chapmand and Hall, 1980. I.7 Gladwell, G.M.L., Contact Problems in Classical Theory of Elasticity, 1981. I.8 Kraus, W., Thin Elastic Shells, 1967. I.9 Mura, T., Micromechanics of Defects in Solids, 2nd Ed. 1987. I.10 Szilard, R., Theory and Analysis of Plates, Prentice Hall, 1974. I.11 Timoshenko, S.P. and Woinowsky-Krieger, S., Theory of Plates & Shells, McGraw-Hill, 1959 I.12 Zienkiewicz, OC., The Finite Element Method, Third Edition, McGraw-Hills, 1977.

II.1 Achenbach, J.D., Wave Propagation in Elastic Solids, North Holland, Amsterdam, 1973. II.2 Clough, R. and Penzien, J., Dynamics of Structures, McGraw-Hills, 1975. II.3 Ewing, W.M., Jardetzky, W.S., and Press, F., Elastic Waves in Layered Media, McGraw-Hills, 1957. II.4 Hurty, W.C. and Rubinstein, M.F., Dynamics of Structures, Prentice Hall, 1964. II.5 Meirovitch, L., Analytical Methods in Vibrations, MacMillan Co., 1967 II.6 Meirovitch, L., Computational Methods in Structural Dynamics, Sijhoff & Noordhoff, 1980. II.7 Thompson, W.T., Vibration Theory and Applications, Prentice Hall, 1975. II.8 Berg, G.V., Elements of Structural Dynamics, Prentice Hall, 1989.

III.1 Atrek, E., Gallagher, R.H., Ragsdell, K.M., and Zienkiewicz, O.C., (Editors), New Directions in Optimum Structural Design, John Wiley, NY, 1984 III.2 Haftka, R.T., Gurdal, Z., and Kamat, M.P., Elements of Structural Optimization, Second Edition, Kluwar Academic Publishers, Boston, 1990. III.3 Lin, T.Y., Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures, Wiley, 1963. III.4 MacGregor, J.G., Reinforced Concrete, Prentice Hall, 1988 III.5 McCormac, J.C., Structural Steel Design (LRFD Method, Harper & Row, 1989 III.6 Morris, A.J., (Ed.), Foundations of Structural Optimization: A Unified Approach, John Wiley, NY, 1982. III.7 Park, R. and Paulay, T., Reinforced Concrete Structures, Wiley, 1974. III.8 Seismological Committee of the Structural Engineers Association of California, Recommended Lateral Force Requirements and Commentary, Current Edition. III.9 Vanderplaats, G.N.,Numerical Optimization Techniques for Engineering Design with Applications, MacGraw-Hills, NY, 1984. III.10 Wang, C.K. and Salmon, C.G., Reinforced Concrete Design, 4th Edition, Harper & Row, 1979.

IV.1 Englekirk, R.E. and Hart, G.C., Earthquake Response of Structures, Prentice Hall 1982. IV.2 Dobrin, M.B., Introduction to Geophysical Prespecting, McGraw-Hill, 1974. IV.3 Hart, G.C., Uncertainty Analysis, Loads, and Safety in Structural Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1982. IV.4 Jacobs, J.A., Russell, R.D., and Wilson, J. T., Physics and Geology, McGraw-Hill, 1974 IV.5 Newmark, N.M. and Rosenbleuth,E., Fundamentals of Earthquake Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1971.

V.1 Barsom, J.M. and Rolfe, S.T., Fracture and Fatigue Control in Structures: Applications of Fracture Mechanics 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1977. V.2 Dally, J.W. and Riley, W.F.,Experimental Stress Analysis, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1971. V.3 Hellan, K., Introduction to Fracture Mechanics, McGraw-Hill, 1984 V.4 Holman, J.P., Experimental Methods for Engineers, McGraw-Hills, 1971.

VI.1 Bathe, K.J., Ozdemir, H., and Wilson, E.L., Static and Dynamic Geometric and Material Nonlinear Analysis, University of California, Berkeley, Structural Engineering Lab, Report No. UCSESM 74-4, 1974. VI.2 Kachanov, L.M., Foundations of the Theory of Plasticity, MIR Publishers, 1974. VI.3 Lin, T.H., Theory of Inelastic Structures, Wiley, 1968. VI.4 Simiteses, G.J., An Introduction to the Elastic Stability of Structures, Prentice Hall, 1976. VI.5 Timoshenko, S.P. and Gere, T., Theory of Elastic Stability, McGraw-Hill, 1976. VI.6 Bazant, Z.P. and Cedolin, L., Stability of Structures, Oxford University Press, 1991.

Professional Journals:

ASCE Journal of Structures ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics Bulletin of the Seismological Society of American EERI Monograph Series Journal of Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics Journal of Geophysics Proceedings of World Conferences on Earthquake Engineering Earthquake Spectra International Journal of Solids and Structures Journal of Applied Mechanics AIAA Journal Journal of The Masonry Society International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering

Example Programs

Major Field

C&EE 235 (I. Static Analysis), C&EE 237A (II. Dynamic Analysis) and six (6) courses C&EE 235B (I. Static Analysis) C&EE 235C (VI. Stability and Nonlinear Analysis) C&EE M240 (III. Design) C&EE 241 (III. Design) C&EE 242 (III. Design) C&EE 244 (III. Design) Note: The four specialized areas are I, II, III, and IV.

(1) Geotechnical Engineering C&EE 220 C&EE 221 C&EE 223 (2) Earthquake Engineering (Specialized Area IV) C&EE 222 C&EE 245 C&EE 246

C&EE 235 (I. Static Analysis) C&EE 237A (II. Dynamic Analysis) and six (6) courses C&EE 232 (I. Static Analysis) C&EE 235B (I. Static Analysis) C&EE 235C (VI. Stability and Nonlinear Analysis) C&EE 236 (VI. Stability and Nonlinear Analysis) C&EE 240 (III. Design) MAE 269B (II. Dynamic Analysis Note: The fours areas of specialization are I, II, III, and VI.

(1) Mechanics of StructuralMaterials (Specialized Area VII) C&EE 233 C&EE 234 MSE 250A (2) Any Appropriate Established Ph.D.Minor Field; e.g., Operations Research Applied Dynamic Systems Dynamics

Format for Written Preliminary Ph.D. Major Field Examination in the Field of Structures. The written Preliminary Ph.D. Exam in the field of Structures is a closed-book exam, given in two parts on separate days.

Part I is a five hour exam consisting of at least five questions covering the prerequisite subject matter contained in courses C&EE 130, C&EE 135B, C&EE 137, and C&EE 141 or C&EE 142.

Part II is a five hour examination covering the subject matter contained in courses C&EE 235A and C&EE 237A plus subject matter contained in at least three additional courses from each student’s study llist.

Prior to the examination, each student will be asked to specify three elective courses from his/her study list for inclusion of related subject matter on the examination; the Sstructures Ph.D. Field Committee will prepare an examination covering subject matter in the specified subject areas.

Each student will submit answers to a total of five questions from Part I and five questions from Part II. Two of the five questions answered in Part II must be those related to the subject matter in courses C&EE 235A and C&EE 237A.

In order to pass the examination a student must receive a passing grade on a total of seven questions, with not less than three passing grads in each Part.

Students may elect to take the Written Preliminary Ph.D. Major Field Examination to satisfy the comprehensive examination requirement in the program leading to the Master of Science in Civil Engineering (Plan II).

Studentsare permitted only two (2) attempts at passing the Written Preliminary Ph.D. Major Field Examination, including any attempts made to satisfy the M.S. comprehensive examination requirements using this examination.

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Structural Engineering (Ph.D. only)

The Structures group is focusing its efforts at the frontiers of structural engineering; across all application domains including civil, aerospace, biological, and mechanical. Specifically, the Structures group is now concentrating its considerable expertise in materials, computational and probabilistic mechanics, structural health monitoring, and high performance computing to model, analyze, simulate, and design complex systems that are characterized by multi-physics processes that transcend several time and length scales: from picoseconds to decades; from the atomic to the scale of an aircraft carrier. The group also seeks to establish a reciprocal relationship between experimentation and computing by utilizing physical experiments to observe behavior phenomena, to measure properties and mechanisms, and to validate computational models, and computational simulations to inform experimentation.

Learn more by viewing the  Ph.D. in Structural Engineering brochure  (pdf). If you need an accessible copy of this document contact [email protected]

Faculty in the structural engineering concentration include:

Christopher Earls

Mircea Grigoriu

Kenneth Hover

Greg McLaskey

Sriramya Nair

Derek Warner

Photo of student waving Cal flag

Civil & Environmental Engineering PhD

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at Berkeley is a place of intellectual vitality. This vitality is evident in its creative and forward-looking curricula and classroom teaching, its attentive academic mentoring, and the innovative research conducted by students and faculty.

CEE focuses on developing future leaders for the engineering profession, for academia, and for applying engineering methods in the broader societal context. CEE conducts cutting-edge research, defining what constitutes the evolving domain of civil and environmental engineering.

We offer both Master's (the Master of Science and the Master of Engineering ) and Doctoral degree programs. We support seven programs of study for the MS and the PhD, each of which has its own prerequisites for admission and degree requirements. CEE offers two programs of study for the MEng. CEE also offers three concurrent degree programs and two certificate programs.

Master of Engineering (MEng)

This professional degree emphasizes solving technical, sociological, environmental, and economic problems involved in the design, construction, and operation of engineering structures, processes, and equipment. Studies include courses in the engineering sciences necessary to the engineering interpretation of the latest scientific developments. Courses in design, operation, humanities, and economics provide a basis for the analysis and solution of problems in professional engineering.

Students in this degree program select either a concentration in Systems (Civil Systems) or Transportation Engineering (see above descriptions). There are options for either full-time or part-time enrollment.

CEEs MEng program is offered in conjunction with the Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership .

Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

These degrees emphasize the application of the natural sciences to the analysis and solution of engineering problems. Advanced courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and the life sciences are normally included in a program that incorporates the engineering systems approach for analysis of problems.

Students in these degree programs select one of the following seven concentrations:

1. Construction Systems: Construction is a large, vital, and exciting field now disrupted by deep technology like AI, robotics, embedded sensors and nano-materials. The industry is reshaping itself for example by increased use of modular and off-site production with radically new supply chains, virtualization and development of digital twins, and innovative management thinking such as Lean Construction.This program will educate you to lead tomorrows automation of the construction industry.

You will learn to leverage these disruptions to realize the next generation of adaptable, resilient, sustainable smart buildings and infrastructure. We teach construction systems as a computational and management science, integrating technology with applications for example to realize state-of-the-art structural and geotechnical designs, to launch you as a technologist, entrepreneur, researcher, academic, or management professional geared to drive construction industry transformation.

Our curriculum includes:

Construction viewed as a socio-technical system including its data science, optimization, and simulation aspects,

Construction viewed as a project-based production system including its organizational, financial, planning, control, legal, and contractual aspects,

Integration with structural and geotechnical design,

Technology including the use of robots, cloud computing, machine learning, sensing, scanning, and information modeling such as BIM and VDC,

Large-scale systems thinking including societal-scale mobility, energy flows, and urban forms,

The freedom to take courses in other disciplines.

Our graduates find a wide range of employment opportunities in private industry and in the public sector, for example in tech companies, consulting, design, building, transportation, and industrial construction firms, as well as in public- and private owner organizations, both domestically as well as internationally.

As we are located in the San Francisco Bay Area the center of major local, national, and international construction activity our Program is strongly interlinked with industry. Our class projects and research leverage the ability to go observe as well as study specific local and international projects. We draw on examples from residential-, commercial building-, industrial-, and heavy/civil construction throughout our curriculum. We also invite industry practitioners to present guest lectures describing industry challenges and solutions.

2. Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate: Energy, climate, and infrastructure systems are closely tied together, and these connections manifest in many forms. Our society cannot function without energy and infrastructure systems. Energy systems with the lowest possible greenhouse gas footprint are a key to mitigating climate change. Civil infrastructure systems are a backbone of society, and they are also major users of energy that needs to be reduced for a more sustainable development.

The objective of the Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate (ECIC) Program is to educate a cadre of professionals who will be able to analyze from engineering, environmental, economic, and management perspectives complex problems such as energy efficiency of buildings, environmentally informed design of transportation systems, embodied energy of construction materials, electricity from renewable sources, and biofuels, and address such overarching societal problems as mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation of infrastructure to a changing climate. ECIC also promotes research at the intersection of energy, infrastructure and climate science.

3. Engineering and Project Management: The Engineering and Project Management (E&PM) Program educates professionals to become leaders in managing projects and companies in Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) and in other industries. E&PM graduates find a wide range of employment opportunities in private industry and in the public sector, for example in engneering consulting-, building-, transportation-, and industrial construction firms, as well as in public- and private owner organizations, both domestically as well as internationally.

As infrastructure systems become more complex, tomorrow's industry leaders must add innovative management thinking to a solid foundation in design and construction. The E&PM Program is uniquely specialized in teaching and researching such new management concepts as Lean Construction, Cost and Schedule Forensics, and Sustainability Engineering. Our teaching and research emphasizes new concepts, technologies, developments, and techniques applicable to both domestic and international project and corporate management. The Program emphasizes the interrelationships of all life-cycle components: planning, design, manufacturing, construction, operation, maintenance, and re-purposing/decommissioning.

As we are located in the San Francisco Bay Area-the center of major local, national, and international project management and construction activity-our Program is strongly interlinked with industry. Our class projects and research leverage the ability to go observe as well as study specific local and international projects. We draw on examples from commercial building-, industrial-, and heavy/civil construction throughout our curriculum. We also invite industry practitioners to present guest lectures describing industry challenges and solutions.

4. Environmental Engineering: Management of environmental resources to protect human health and the systems that support life is one of the biggest challenges facing modern society. In recognition of the interdisciplinary nature of these challenges, Berkeley's Environmental Engineering Program provides you with the education needed to address current and future environmental issues. Graduate coursework and research is focused in three Areas of Emphasis :

  • Air Quality Engineering (AQE)
  • Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology (EFMH)
  • Water Quality Engineering (WQE)

You are encouraged to develop a broad set of problem-solving skills through courses and research in related fields such as:

  • Berkeley Atmospheric Sciences Center
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • Energy & Resources Group
  • Environmental Science, Policy & Management
  • Integrative Biology
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Plant & Microbial Biology
  • School of Public Health

5. GeoSystems : The GeoSystems Program encompasses a broad area of teaching and research in geotechnical and geological engineering, environmental geotechnics, and applied geophysics. The focus is on the evaluation of engineering properties of geologic materials and on providing engineering solutions for dealing with geologic environment and processes, and natural hazards.

To this end we pursue studies of the mechanical behavior of soil and rock masses, laboratory and field characterization of material properties, development and application of geophysical techniques for site and subsurface characterization, development of advanced analysis methods, and evaluation of static and dynamic (seismic) performance of soil deposits, earth structures, and underground space.

The GeoSystems graduate program has a long tradition of excellence and its graduates are leaders in the industry and academia. The strength and breadth of Berkeley's GeoSystems is enhanced by close ties with faculty in other areas of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences. Close interaction of the faculty with consulting companies and practitioners also provides opportunity for exposure to the state-of-the-art practice through invited lectures and site visits to ongoing engineering projects in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Due to the broad interdisciplinary nature of the field we welcome students with a wide range of backgrounds in Engineering and Earth Sciences.

6. Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials: CEE's Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials (SEMM) Program has an international reputation for excellence. Many of the fundamental developments underlying the state-of-the-art in structural engineering, mechanics, and materials were pioneered by SEMM faculty and students. This tradition of excellence continues today through vigorous programs of basic and applied research, and careful attention to instruction.

The active involvement of SEMM faculty in the forefront of research projects and in the solution of challenging real world engineering problems results in an instructional program that is up-to-date and relevant. SEMM offers excellent opportunities for study and research leading to advanced degrees in the areas of structural analysis and design, mechanics of structures and solids, and materials in structures and construction.

The curriculum provides a strong basis for advanced professional practice, research, or teaching. Programs of study can be tailored easily to fit individual needs and interests, whether broad-based and multidisciplinary, or narrowly focused and highly technical. Graduates from the SEMM Program have gone on to become world leaders in private practice, government service, education, and research.

7. Systems (Civil Systems): The focus of the Systems Engineering Program (Systems) is understanding complex large-scale systems and developing tools for their design and operation. Such systems encompass built elements in the broad sense (infrastructures transportation, structures, etc.), societal systems (social networks, populations enterprises), and natural systems (land water, air). These systems are at the core of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the 21st Century.

The understanding of how such systems work requires knowledge about the constitutive laws that govern them, such as traffic flow, fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, and smart networks. It also requires an understanding of the theoretical paradigms that are used to model, control and optimize such systems. These include the theories of computation, control theory, optimization, behavioral economics, sensor networks, statistics, and signal processing.

In response to these challenges, the Systems Program provides courses that cover both field knowledge and technical/theoretical tools. This is reflected in the curriculum. We offer masters and doctoral degree programs providing the key skills, e.g., technological, mathematical, or social scientific, as well as the knowledge for a broad range of engineering domains. Our graduates lead the next generation of research, start-ups, industrial corporations, and public-sector organizations.

8. Transportation Engineering: Graduate studyin transportation at the University of California, Berkeley prepares you for a professional, teaching, and research career. Emphasis is on the acquisition of advanced knowledge concerning planning, design, operations, maintenance, rehabilitation, performance, and evaluation of transportation systems, including their economic and public policy aspects. The program stresses development of analytic, problem-solving, design, and management skills suitable for public and private sector professional work.

Transportation Engineering faculty with diverse backgrounds and research interests, including emeriti professors, teach transportation courses. In addition, faculty from City and Regional Planning , Economics , Industrial Engineering and Operations Research , Business Administration , Political Science , and other departments offer courses related to transportation.

Students also have the opportunity to work and interact with research staff at the Institute of Transportation Studies .

Students in the PhD program have the option of pursuing a designated emphasis (DE) to supplement their study.

Concurrent Degrees

The concurrent degree program is a formal arrangement of two existing, but separate, master's degree programs, which result in the students earning two masters degrees. CEE offers the following concurrent degree programs:

  • Program in Structural Engineering and Architecture (MArch/MS)
  • Program in Transportation Engineering and City and Regional Planning (MCP/MS)
  • Any CEE graduate program and Public Policy (MPP/MS)

For further information regarding these programs, please see the department's website .

Certificates

Certificate in Engineering and Business for Sustainability: The Engineering and Business for Sustainability (EBS) Certificate Program trains UC Berkeley graduate students to understand the complexity and urgency of their role in engineering, business, and environmental management, and to work across boundaries to achieve sustainable solutions to pressing societal problems. This program allows students to tap into multidisciplinary educational resources from the College of Engineering , Haas School of Business , Energy and Resources Group , Goldman School of Public Policy , College of Natural Resources , and the School of Public Health , to learn how to have a lasting beneficial impact on the global environment. This program is open to all Berkeley graduate students who meet the EBS Certificate course requirements. For further information regarding this program, see the department's website .

Certificate in Intelligent Transportation Systems: Jointly sponsored by CEE, the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering, this program is designed to assist students in studying ITS in a systematic and focused way. Faculty advisers help students design a personalized study program to meet their goals. For more information regarding this program, see the department's website .

Designated Emphasis

Berkeley Ph.D. students are eligible to pursue a Designated Emphasis as part of their doctoral studies. Common Designated Emphases for CEE doctoral students include:

  • Computational and Data Science and Engineering
  • Global Metropolitan Studies
  • Development Engineering

A designated emphasis is a specialization, such as a new method of inquiry or an important field of application, which is relevant to two or more existing doctoral degree programs. You are required to complete the academic work in the area of specialization and all the requirements of the doctoral program. You must be admitted to the DE before taking the qualifying examination. A complete list of Designated Emphases is here .

Contact Info

[email protected]

760 Davis Hall

Berkeley, CA 94720

At a Glance

Department(s)

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Admit Term(s)

Application Deadline

December 11, 2023

Degree Type(s)

Doctoral / PhD

Degree Awarded

GRE Requirements

SEM Banner

The Structural Engineering and Materials program offers graduate studies and research opportunities focused on the broad advancement of structural engineering and the built environment. Click on the links to the right to learn more about specific topics.

Bridge Engineering Center

The Virginia Cooperative Center for Bridge Engineering seeks to advance the state of Bridge Engineering in the U. S. with a strategic emphasis on the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Center is jointly administered by Virginia Tech and the Virginia Transportation Council with the following objectives:

  • Increase the number of multidisciplinary graduates at BS, MS, and PhD levels entering the practice of bridge engineering
  • Advance the practical technology base for bridge engineering and design
  • Transfer new and relevant bridge engineering technologies to the US and Commonwealth of Virginia transportation officials
  • Work cooperatively with VTRC and VDOT to address bridge engineering issues of immediate importance to the Commonwealth.
  • Provide continuing education opportunities for US and Commonwealth bridge engineering officials (via distance learning and strategic short courses)

Computation Modeling, Materials, and Mechanics

Faculty Member: Dr.  Ioannis Koutromanos

CONCRETE AND MASONRY STRUCTURES – Constitutive models, performance assessment, retrofit techniques

Constitutive modeling of quasibrittle materials.

The behavior of concrete and masonry structures under cyclic loading is complicated, because a number of different mechanisms can affect the structural response. The occurrence of large cracks is common for older concrete and masonry construction, due to the possibility for shear cracking. Additionally, localized mode-I crack opening and shear (mode-II) slip is expected to occur along the masonry mortar bed joints. Numerical simulation is a powerful tool for the performance assessment of such systems, allowing the determination of the response for a variety of structural configurations, material properties and loading scenarios. To this end, constitutive models must be developed to account for the inelastic behavior of quasibrittle materials (materials whose behavior is affected by cracking processes) under multi-axial stress states.

The finite element simulation of strongly localized damage (large strains concentrated over very narrow bands) with continuum elements leads to an overestimation of the strength and ductility. To avoid such overestimations, discrete cohesive crack interface elements must be introduced in a finite element model to obtain the correct deformation patterns and the strength degradation associated with strongly localized damage.

Specific research topics include:

  • Formulation and numerical implementation of constitutive models to describe the stress-strain behavior of materials characterized by cracking processes.
  • Numerical analyses of inhomogeneous quasibrittle materials at the meso- or micro-scale to elucidate the effect of the constituent interaction on the observed macroscopic behavior.
  • Formulation and implementation of discrete crack interface elements to accurately simulate the effect of strongly localized damage.

Constitutive modeling of quasibrittle materials.

Seismic Performance Assessment of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings Using Computational Models

Reinforced concrete and masonry structures constitute a significant portion of the building inventory in various earthquake-prone areas around the world. The determination of the seismic performance of such systems is of uttermost importance for the hazard assessment of the built environment.

Detailed nonlinear finite element models can capture the cyclic load-displacement response and failure mechanisms of concrete and masonry buildings for any earthquake loading scenario. Finite element modeling can also determine the improvement in performance of older construction due to the application of retrofit techniques.

Research topics include:

  • Validation of detailed analytical models using the results of experimental tests.
  • Performance assessment for archetype structural configurations, subjected to collections of ground motions scaled to various intensity levels.
  • Investigation of the effect of retrofit techniques on the seismic performance of old construction.

Seismic Performance Assessment of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings Using Computational Models

Earthquake Engineering

Faculty Member: Dr.  Roberto Leon

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING-  conducting computational simulations and experiments to better understand seismic behavior and improve design provisions for steel and composite structural systems.

Composite Structural Systems

Composite steel-concrete structures offer significant benefits in terms of strength, stiffness and ductility for design in seismic areas.  This form of construction is popular in Japan, China, and the rest of Southeast Asia for tall buildings, and is recognized by USA codes. However, it is not commonly used because of the perceived lack of design provisions, particularly with respect to connections.

Specific research experimental topics include:

  • Shear transfer between steel and concrete under large cyclic deformation reversals.
  • the appropriate values of stiffness and strength to be used in analysis,
  • the presence of openings in the floor slab, any preexisting slab cracking, and the modeling of connections to chord and collectors,the interactions between in-plane and out-of-plane forces at the local level, and
  • the degree of ductility and load path redundancy that can be obtained from diaphragms and their connections.
  • Behavior and design of circular and rectangular concrete-filled tube columns with high strength concrete and slender tube sections under large cyclic load reversals.
  • Behavior and design of composite connections between composite steel-concrete beams and concrete filled tubes with emphasis on local force transfer between steel and concrete.

Specific research modeling and simulation topics include:

  • Shear and bearing force transfer between steel and concrete under large cyclic deformation reversals.
  • Local buckling of composite sections.
  • Plastic hinge length and rotational capacity.
  • Advanced analytical models of connection behavior and performance, including combinations of shape-memory alloys and similar advanced materials to re-center connections and improve energy dissipation capacity.
  • Incremental dynamic analysis of archetypes structures in support of development of structural system factors (R, Cd,and W0).

Composite Structural Systems

Innovative Braces

In conventional seismic systems, the primary lateral resisting structural elements deform inelastically to dissipate energy during a large seismic event.  This inelastic deformation, a direct consequence of the use of ductility concepts in design, often leads to a large residual interstory drift, severe damage to structural and nonstructural elements, costly repairs, and large indirect economic losses after a major earthquake. The main thrust of this research is the development of a brace in which (1) the need for energy dissipation does not lead to residual deformations, and (2) the reuse of the re-centering component and easy replacement of the energy dissipating components damaged in an event are easily achievable. This device uses conventional buckling restrained struts to dissipate energy and superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires to recenter the structure. These innovative robust hybrid braces considerably reduce permanent drift and are assembled from easily replaceable damageable elements – (Joint work with Drs. Walter Yang and Reginald Desroches – Georgia Tech)

Innovative Braces

Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Joints

Evaluation of older reinforced concrete frames has focused on weaknesses related primarily to shear capacity of beams and columns as well as insufficient anchorage of reinforcement.  In general little has been done to model large levels of joint shear strength and deformation for older frames where joint shear failure and pullout of the bottom bars is a possibility.  Analytical studies are underway to develop an OpenSEES joint model capable of tracking this type of phenomenon.

Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Joints

Retrofit of Older Reinforced Concrete Moment Frames

This experimental work is  will evaluate the efficacy of a new class of innovative systems with recentering and/or high damping capabilities, and will develop a framework for their design and implementation to retrofit reinforced concrete (RC) buildings. Five retrofit measures will be investigated to achieve this goal, consisting of novel bracing systems, beam-column connection elements, or columns wraps. Common advantageous characteristics of the systems include the ease of application (requiring little-to-no heavy machinery), scalability and adaptability, passive nature, and need for little-to-no maintenance through the life-cycle. Tests will be carried out on unretroffitted and retrofitted slices of a building using a large shaker (Joint work with Drs. Yang Wang and Reginald DesRoches – Georgia Tech)

Retrofit of Older Reinforced Concrete Moment Frames

Modern Sensors for Crack Detection in Steel Bridges

A wireless strain sensing system is under development to exploit the operation principle of a passive (batteryless) radio frequency identification (RFID) system.  The system consists of an RFID reader and an RFID tag, where the tag includes an antenna and an integrated circuit (IC) chip.  The reader emits interrogation electromagnetic signal to the tag (at power level P1), so that the tag is activated and reflects signal back to the reader (with power level P1′).  This reflection is also called backscattering.  The system is classified as passive because the RFID tag does not require its own power supply, i.e. the tag receives its operation power entirely through the electromagnetic emission from the reader (Joint work with Drs. Yang Wang and Manos Tentzeris – Georgia Tech).

Modern Sensors for Crack Detection in Steel Bridges

Field Testing of Structures and Post-Earthquake Performance Assessment

Full-scale testing of structures and assessment of their service performance throughout their life cycle is an integral part of the code improvement process.  This work is important for curved and skewed bridges and buildings with irregularities in strength and stiffness.  Only high quality field data should be used to calibrate and validate models that can then be used for larger parametric studies.

Similarly, post-earthquake investigations, particularly those aimed at comparing levels of performance between different detailing approaches, are an important tool to assess the real strength and deformation capacity of structural systems.  Work in this area in countries with construction practices similar to the USA (Chile and New Zealand, for example) is particularly valuable

Composite Structural Systems

Sustainable Infrastructure Materials

Faculty Member: Dr. Zack Grasley

Research in sustainable infrastructure materials incorporates the following aspects:

  • Quantification of durability through novel experimental techniques
  • Modeling of environmentally-induced deformation in cementitious materials
  • Development of novel cementitious materials using nanometric modifiers and inclusions
  • Coupling of thermodynamics, mechanics, and chemistry to uncover mechanisms linking environment, reactions, and deformation of reacting media
  • Development of high-damping materials for more resilient infrastructure
  • Computational materials science applications to material sustainability and behavior

Atomic force microscopy image of calcium silicate hydrate phase of portland cement paste

Thin-Walled Structures

Faculty Member: Dr. Cris Moen (with colleagues from the College of Engineering)

THIN-WALLED STRUCTURES –  interfacing structural mechanics, computational simulations, and experiments to better understand the physical behavior of thin-walled structural members

Cold-Formed Steel Framed Buildings

Cold-formed steel is a popular construction material in low and midrise commercial and residential building construction that gains it stiffness and strength through its shape. Recent advances in thin-walled structural analysis is motivating broad sweeping changes to design approaches and codes, especially for components (e.g., studs, joists) and systems (e.g., sheathed walls, pre-manufactured metal buildings) facing wind and seismic loads.

  • Buckling and capacity of cold-formed steel members with holes
  • Cold work of forming and plasticity
  • Initial imperfection characterization with non-contact measurements
  • Computational simulations to collapse of cold-formed steel members and systems
  • Mechanics-based design methods and tools
  • Seismic design of cold-formed steel framed buildings

Cold-formed steel framing is used to construct midrise buildings

Aluminum Structures

Aluminum is a popular material used in naval structures because of its light weight and corrosion resistance.  Most design methods for naval structures were developed in the WWII era and are currently being updated with modern thin-walled analysis and tools.

  • Buckling deformation and strength of L-stiffened aluminum ship wall and deck panels
  • Influence of friction stir welding on the structural behavior of thin-walled ship hulls
  • Multi-physics structural performance of thin-walled ship hulls at high temperatures

Multi-Functional Thin-Walled Structures

Multi-functional materials such as carbon fiber composites and those created with additive manufacturing (3D printing) can benefit many aspects of our society – from better bridge construction materials to more fuel efficient commercial aircraft to deep space vehicles that are resistant to space radiation.

  • Tow steered composite tailoring to maximize capacity of thin-walled cylindrical tubes for aerospace applications
  • Multi-functional material structures – for example, lightweight cellular structures with zero coefficient of thermal expansion constructed with additive manufacturing

Tailored tow steered carbon fiber composites can increase buckling capacity of thin-walled elliptical cylinders

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Doctor of Philosophy in Structural Engineering

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is a research-oriented degree requiring a minimum of 64 semester credit hours of approved courses and research beyond the Master of Science or Master of Engineering degree in an approved and related program [96 credit hours beyond the Bachelor of Science degree.

A complete discussion of all university requirements is found in the current Texas A&M University Graduate Catalog . For example, university requirements include a preliminary examination, a final examination and submission of a dissertation to the university.

Structural Engineering Faculty Members

  • Dr. Luciana Barroso
  • Dr. Anna Birely
  • Dr. Joseph Bracci
  • Dr. Mary Beth Hueste
  • Dr. Stefan Hurlebaus
  • Dr. Peter Keating
  • Dr. Maria Koliou
  • Dr. Lee Lowery
  • Dr. John Mander
  • Dr. John Niedzwecki
  • Dr. Arash Noshadravan
  • Dr. Stephanie Paal
  • Dr. Petros Sideris
  • Dr. Kinsey Skillen

Advising Committee

The student must select an Advisory Committee Chair, who will serve as their graduate advisor, from the department’s structural engineering graduate faculty. A student can have a co-chair from a faculty member that does not have an appointment with the department’s structural engineering group. A committee must have either one chair or one chair and one co-chair.

The chair and the student collaborate in selecting the remainder of the Advisory Committee. The advising committee for the Doctor of Philosophy in structural engineering must have a minimum of four members from the Texas A&M graduate faculty (the chair counts as a member). There must be at least one member from outside the civil and environmental engineering department and there must be a majority from within the department, with at least two members being from the structural engineering faculty (the chair counts as one of these members).

Departmental Requirements

In addition to fulfilling the University requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a student enrolled in the civil and environmental engineering graduate program in the area of Structural Engineering must satisfy the following department requirements.

  • For the 64 credit hours Doctor of Philosophy program beyond the S. degree, a minimum of 24 credit hours of graduate level coursework is required provided the student already has taken at least another 24 credit hours of graduate course work for the Master of Science or Master of Engineering degree.
  • For the 96 credit hours Doctor of Philosophy program beyond the S. degree, a minimum of 48 credit hours of graduate level coursework is required.
  • For both PhD programs, a maximum of 3 semester credit hours of CVEN 685 Directed Studies can be applied toward this

Structural Engineering Requirements

The student must also satisfy the following area requirements and/or recommendations described below:

  • Seminar: 0 or 1 semester credit hours
  • Qualifying Exam: A Qualifying Examination will be scheduled with members of the structural engineering The exam should be taken prior to the student’s second semester (fall or spring) of study.
  • Degree Plan: An advisory committee must be formed that includes at least two structural engineering faculty members, and a Degree Plan must be submitted and approved by the advisory committee after passing the Qualifying Exam and early during their second semester (fall or spring) of The degree plan must be filed before the course registration for the third semester of study.
  • Written Preliminary Exam: After completion of a majority of the coursework listed on the Degree Plan (with the exception of CVEN 691 Research), but ideally no later than the end of the fourth semester (fall or spring) of study, a Written Preliminary Examination will be scheduled with members of the advisory
  • Oral Preliminary Exam: After passing the Written Preliminary Exam, but ideally no later than the end of the fourth semester (fall or spring) of study, an Oral Preliminary Examination will be scheduled with members of the advisory
  • Research Proposal: As soon as the research project can be outlined in reasonable detail, but ideally no later than the end of the fifth semester (fall or spring) of study, the dissertation research proposal should be
  • Completion of Dissertation: Upon approval of the Dissertation by the advisory committee chair, the Dissertation will be submitted to the other members of the advisory
  • Final Defense: A Final Defense consisting of an oral examination will be scheduled with all of the advisory committee members.

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  • Structural Engineering (M.S. & Ph.D.)

Lehigh’s graduate program in structural engineering focuses on analytical and experimental studies of structural behavior. Students develop the technical knowledge and problem-solving capabilities needed to design and construct complex, large-scale structural systems.

A diversity of faculty research allows students to pursue projects that align with their interests and career goals. Students also have the opportunity to collaborate with other universities as well as world-class engineering firms.

Program research areas include:

  • advanced structural materials and systems;
  • earthquake resistant structures;
  • infrastructure hazard mitigation;
  • intelligent infrastructure systems;
  • simulation measurement and evaluation of new and in-service structures; and
  • infrastructure reliability, maintenance, and life-cycle performance.

Lehigh students work in structural testing facilities that are among the largest in North America, enabling research in earthquake engineering, fiber-reinforced composites, fatigue and fracture, development of smart structures, shipbuilding, and life-cycle engineering. Our Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems (ATLSS) Engineering Research Center is home to the largest three-dimensional test bed in the U.S. ATLSS also features a real-time, multi-dimensional earthquake testing facility and conducts seismic research as part of the George E. Brown, Jr. Network Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) Program. Other specialized facilities, such the 5-million-pound universal hydraulic testing machine in Fritz Laboratory, round out Lehigh’s unique research capabilities in structural engineering.

Affiliated Lehigh Research Centers, Laboratories and Institutes

  • Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology
  • Center for Photonics and Nanoelectronics
  • Energy Research Center
  • Advanced Technology and Large Structural Systems (ATLSS) Engineering Research Center
  • Real Time Multi-Directional (RTMD) National Facility – NSF Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES)  

[Note: see also Lehigh's innovative 10-month Professional Master's program in  Structural Engineering .]

  • Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng., Ph.D.)
  • Environmental Engineering (M.S, M.Eng. & Ph.D.)
  • Structural Engineering (M.Eng.)
  • Graduate Certificates
  • Free Info Session
  • Meet a CEE Student
  • Meet a CEE grad advisor

CEE: Meet a Student or Advisor

CONSIDERING GRAD SCHOOL? TALK TO US!

Questions about courses? Research experience? Life on campus? Let's set up some time to chat!

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phd topics in structural engineering

  • Doing a PhD in Civil Engineering

What Does a PhD in Civil Engineering Focus On?

If you wish to conduct research into something which has real impact and could directly benefit society on a daily basis, a PhD in Civil Engineering could be for you. Civil Engineering is a broad field that encompasses the design, construction and operation of the built environment which shapes our lives. From designing highways and building bridges to maintaining sewer systems and assessing flood risk, the work of civil engineers is fundamental to allowing cities to work the way they do.

A PhD in Civil Engineering provides you with the opportunity to work with emerging technology and industrial partners, and engage in research that has a direct impact on society. From assessing the accuracy of engineering codes and standards to developing novel approaches to the computational modelling of flood events, each Civil Engineering research project has a real-life application. Beyond this, doctoral study in Civil Engineering could allow you to operate in interdisciplinary research, work with a university’s industry partners, gain expertise and build a foundation for your career as an industry professional.

There are many branches of Civil Engineering, and graduates who wish to pursue doctorate study will have to choose a civil engineering specialization. Examples of popular civil engineering topics include:

  • Structural Engineering – A PhD in structural engineering could look at how we can manage the impact of earthquakes on skyscrapers in areas of seismic activity to contribute to the development of resilient structures. Alternatively, this could be a local investigation into a single RC beam, and how reinforcement layout affects material behaviour.
  • Geotechnical Engineering – Postgraduate research programmes here could involve assessing the accuracy of ground modelling techniques in different environments, or looking at how vibrations in the ground affect soil properties.
  • Hydraulic and Fluid Dynamics – Doctoral research in fluid flow could revolve around coastal engineering or instead could focus on using computational software to model water flows associated with a hydroelectric dam. Other PhD students could focus on wind engineering and involve monitoring fluid flow in small scale wind tunnels built in a laboratory.
  • Sustainability – A research project in sustainability could study sustainable design or the reliability of renewable energy sources and how they can be retrofitted into existing systems. Alternatively, a sustainability PhD research degree could look at the growing population and how this may affect city planning or urban development in the near and distant future.
  • Environmental Engineering – Postgraduate study in this field could look at identifying potential effects of extreme weather events associated with climate change, such as flooding, and how we can prepare for them.
  • Transportation Engineering – A doctoral degree in this branch may involve understanding traffic behaviour in different population densities, or evaluating the effectiveness of public transportation networks.
  • Construction Engineering and Management – A PhD in construction management could involve a review of the effectiveness of UK legislation such as CDM 2015.

Browse Civil Engineering PhD Opportunities

From text to tech: shaping the future of physics-based simulations with ai-driven generative models, coventry university postgraduate research studentships, aerodynamics and noise of next-generation distributed propulsion system, high speed photography to investigate surface wear and fatigue in railway rail and wheel steels, improved understanding of the vaiont landslide based on refined modelling using updated geological information, minimum entry requirements for a phd in civil engineering.

The minimum academic entry requirements for a Civil Engineering doctorate programme are usually either a relevant first class honours degree, or a second class honours degree (undergraduate) with a relevant Master’s degree.

It is important that the applicant has a degree in a subject directly relevant to the PhD project. Typically, a Civil Engineering degree is preferred, however, the particular field of study often dictates this, for example: A research project studying geotechnical behaviour could accept degrees in Geography, Environmental Science, and Earth Science. Similarly, a research project modelling structural properties could accept degrees in Maths , Computing, and Physics . Universities also consider applicants with international equivalent qualifications.

Relevant work experience can improve your application. It is therefore advisable for current students, who are considering PhD study to complete internships or summer placements during their graduate study.

Beyond any degree requirement, prospective students also need to provide proof of their English Language ability. Universities will expect international students to have English Language Qualifications, for example, IELTS, TOEFL (iBT) or Pearson PTE scores. The exact score requirements of these exams will vary depending on the university, however typical requirements for a doctoral candidate are stated below:

How Long Does It Take to Get a PhD in Civil Engineering?

Full time Civil Engineering PhD programmes in the UK usually have a duration of 3 years, with part time programmes lasting 6 years. For a full time programme, the first year is normally a probationary year, where the PhD student is required to propose a PhD thesis in Civil Engineering. Upon acceptance, the research phase begins, which typically involves laboratory work, but due to the different civil engineering branches may involve the research students undertaking numerical modelling, programming/computation, or fieldwork. After submission of the PhD thesis, doctoral researchers are required to undergo an oral examination (Viva Voce) before being awarded their PhD degree.

During your project, your supervisor or relevant academic staff for your department may encourage you to present findings and produce papers. You are also likely to be required to attend training courses to progress your transferable skills development for your future career.

Costs and Funding

Annual tuition fees for a UK doctoral student applying to a 2021/22 PhD programme in Civil Engineering are around £4,000 to £5,000. For EU and overseas students, these tuition fees increase to around £20,000 to £24,000 per academic year. Part-time tuition fees are normally proportioned according to the research programme length.

There are many funding opportunities available for Civil Engineering PhDs. Most institutions have Centres for Doctoral Training in Civil Engineering, which offer a number of Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council ( EPSRC ) studentships to eligible applicants. These studentships and grants cover tuition fees and can provide a maintenance stipend and research travel expenses.

The British Federation of Women Graduates offers a number of scholarships to eligible female postgraduate students. There are also many scholarships for international Civil Engineering students, for example, doctoral candidates from the US can apply to scholarships such as the British Marshall Scholarship or the Fulbright student scholarships which cover the costs of studying a doctoral degree in the UK.

Postgraduate research students may also be eligible for a Postgraduate Doctoral Loan overseen by the UK Government which can provide up to £25,000 for course fees and living costs associated with your research project.

PhD in Civil Engineering Salary and Career Paths

One of the main benefits of Civil Engineering is that the wide applications open up many varied career opportunities. PhD holders have problem solving skills that allow them to transfer into different industries, and it is not uncommon to see Civil Engineering doctorates working in finance, consultancy, engineering research careers and management.

Typical Civil Engineering jobs include:

  • CAD Technicians
  • Contractors
  • Consultants
  • Quantity Surveyors
  • Project management

Within each of these jobs, there is a wide range of sub disciplines. For example, one contractor may work on the maintenance of wind turbines, whilst another may focus on excavations in marine environments. The typical starting salary for a graduate Civil Engineering role is around £25,000. With experience, this can increase to over £50,000. It should be noted that holding a PhD degree often allows for greater career progression and opens doors to unique and diverse opportunities, with greater levels of responsibility and innovation. Consequently, PhD applicants can expect a more lucrative salary to reflect their expertise.

Typical employers include civil engineering consultancies and contractors, gas and utility companies, government bodies (e.g. Network Rail or Highways England) and research institutes. Universities and other academic institutions are also common employers, as some doctoral students transition from their postgraduate research programme to a teaching role.

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Structural Engineering Dissertation Topics For Prodigious Dissertation

Date published July 31 2020 by Stella Carter

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The most important thing in a dissertation is making a great first impression. You might think that a great first impression can be made through a good abstract or even a good introduction, but the thing that actually compels a reader to pick up and read your dissertation is your dissertation topic. This is the reason majority of the supervisor’s advice students to work extensively on their dissertation topic.

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Latest Structural Engineering Dissertation Topics for 2022-2023

To make sure that you make the best possible first impression, our industry leading senior professional writers have prepared a list of the best free structural engineering dissertation topics and structural engineering dissertation ideas, specifically for your guidance and help.

The research aim to analyse high durability Materials for Earth Quake Proof Structures and their Integration with Existing System

Objectives :

  • To design high quality earthquake proof material that can resists high shocks without compromising structural integrity.
  • To identify the challenges related to introducing advanced shock proof material into existing system and the ways to overcome it.
  • To evaluate the environmental impact of the new materials and the ways to minimize them to acceptable levels.

The study aims for the design and Testing of Military grade blast resistant structural designs for highly sensitive environment

  • To design the blast resistant material for hostile environments.
  • To analyse the minimum time to build blast resistant structures.
  • To determine the point of failure for blast resistant structures.
  • To provide economic analysis of new material design in comparison with existing blast resistant materials in sensitive environment.

The study is aimed to evaluate the recycling process of plastic waste for the manufacturing of brick and the associated economic factors

  • To analyse the challenges related to the use of plastic material for the production of brick.
  • To evaluate the economic challenges related to the manufacturing process and the ways to overcome them
  • To find the structural integrity of plastic bricks as compared to regular bricks.
  • To analyse the environmental benefits of the process.

The study aims To Evaluate the use of Graphene in Manufacturing High Quality cost-effective Steel and Their Use In offshore Design

  • To find the elastic, plastic and tensile strength of graphene coated steel and their effectiveness in offshore oil rigs.
  • To evaluate corrosion resistance and effective life of the material in offshore rig environment.
  • To analyse the cost-effective ways to build the graphene coated material on industrial scale.
  • To evaluate the material integration with concrete and its behavior under compressional, tensile and shear strength.

The research aim to design Cost-effective Dams to Address Seasonal Flooding Problems to minimize their Environmental Impacts

  • To find the cost effective methods for dam design that can be used to counter seasonal flooding and minimise their impacts.
  • To evaluate the structural integrity of these dams and their effectiveness in natural environment.
  • To analyse the positive and negative environmental aspects of the dams.
  • To evaluate the cost of build of these dams and the ways to minimize it.

The research aims to examine different techniques to evaluate and determine the asphalt content and road deterioration.

  • To analyse different models for pavement deterioration.
  • To identify the main indicators of pavement deterioration.
  • To identify different condition responsible for pavement deterioration.
  • To compare modern and conventional techniques to address deterioration.

The research aims to analyse the structural challenges related to underground intra-city train network for London city and implementation of spatial stress analysis to overcome them.

  • To analyse the structural challenges related to development of underground train network.
  • To evaluate the process and techniques involved in the development of the underground train network using spatial stress analysis.
  • To design the process addressing the structural challenges of the project.
  • To analyse the implementation of design process on existing system of train network.

The study aims to develop advanced risk assessment tools to determine structural integrity of dynamic and complex structure using simulation modelling.

  • To develop a risk assessment tool for dynamic and complex structures.
  • To determine the accuracy of simulation modelling in comparison to real time analysis.
  • To analyse the structural integrity of different structure and evaluate their point of failure.
  • To evaluate the efficiency of the simulation tool in comparison to existing software.

The research aims to analyse the necessary arrangements required to build mega structures in coastal areas using the case study of Patimban Seaport, Indonesia.

  • To analyse the challenges related in building mega structures in coastal areas using the example of Patimban Seaport, Indonesia.
  • To evaluate the ways to address the challenges related in building mega structures in coastal areas.
  • To design the cost-effective methods for the reinforcing the coastal areas to sustain mega structures.
  • To analyse the environmental and economic impacts of the project.

The research aims to evaluate the use of Oobleck along with concrete for the development of high resistance structures and its economic impact.

  • To design the process for the development of Oobleck based concrete.
  • To evaluate the economic impact of Oobleck based concrete compared to regular concrete.
  • To determine the expected life and point of failure for Oobleck based concrete.

The aim of the study is to conduct an explorative analysis to identify and analyze traditional techniques that are utilized for the determination of road and asphalt deterioration. The research aims to analyze to compare modern resources and old techniques. The aim of the study is to identify are these conventional techniques outdated?

Objectives:

The primary objective of the study is to achieve the aim of the study. However, the aim of the study can be achieved through secondary objectives. Therefore, the secondary objectives of the study are the following:

  • To study the model of pavement deterioration.
  • To identify the main conditions of pavement indicators.
  • To analyze the conventional methods of road and asphalt deterioration.
  • To conduct a comparative, analyze the modern and conventional techniques of deterioration.

The aim of the study is to conduct a novel analysis of the changes in structural engineering over time. The research aims to study that will these modern and new hardware and software will certainly provide more accurate solutions. Therefore, the aim of the study is to analyze and characterize the change and modification that have been occurred in the structural engineering processes because of the computer. The research thereby aims to offer direction for the additional development in structural engineering by utilizing computers in structural design.

The primary objectives of the study are to achieve the aim of the study. However, the aim of the study can be achieved through secondary objectives. Therefore, the secondary objectives of the study are the following:

  • To study the concept of structural engineering.
  • To evaluate the changes, occur in structural engineering over time.
  • To study the future of structural engineering and build an understanding of the past of structural engineering.
  • To study the change process of structural engineering.
  • To evaluate the development and history of structural engineering.
  • To analyze the role of technology in modifying structural engineering.
  • To study how these modern and new hardware and software will offer accurate solutions.
  • To offer a suggestion for more development in structural engineering.

The aim of the study is to conduct a systematic analysis of the role played by a structural engineer in advancing the medical procedures and technologies. The research aims to analyze the growing significance of the structural engineer. The aim of the study is to evaluate the growing need for specialization in the engineering field.

  • To analyze the role of structural engineers.
  • To evaluate the structural engineer role in medical procedure and technologies.
  • To study the growing significance of structural engineers.
  • To evaluate the growing need of specializing in the field of structural engineers.
  • To analyze the transformation of a structural engineer over time.

The aim of the study is to conduct an evaluative study on the third zone engineering networking principal. The research aims to analyze the effectiveness of the third zone engineering in evaluating the structures of building and for the revolution of the overall industry.

The primary objective of the study is to achieve the aim of the study. However, the aim of the study can be achieved through various secondary objectives. Therefore, the secondary objectives of the study are the following:

  • To study the concept of third zone engineering.
  • To analyze the role of third zone engineering.
  • To evaluate the significance of third zone engineering.
  • To determine the efficacy of third zone technique in structural building.
  • To analyze the third zone engineering networking principal.
  • To evaluate the impact of third zone engineering in the evaluation of structure building.

The aim of the study is to examine the use of modelling geo-mechanical in structural engineering. The research aims to analyze the role of uncertainty quantification regarding the model of geo-mechanical inverse in structural engineering. The aim of the study is to enable the practitioner engineer to understand the factors of uncertainty and its consequences related to geo-mechanic inverse deeply. Moreover, the research aims to analyze the benefits of reducing uncertainty consequences.

  • To evaluate the concept of the geo-mechanical inverse.
  • To analyze the use of the geo-mechanical inverse model in general.
  • To evaluate the use of the geo-mechanical inverse model in structural engineering.
  • To analyze the uncertainties related to the geo-mechanical inverse model.
  • To analyze the possible consequences of the geo-mechanical inverse model.
  • To determine the role of the geomechanical model in structural engineering.
  • To evaluate how the geomechanical model can overcome the uncertainties in structural engineering.

The aim of the study is to conduct a novel study on the measurement of shock transmission by the geologic material. The research aims to identify and determine the materials for the structure of the building that are anti-earthquake.

  • To study the concept of geological material.
  • To measure the impact of geological material in shock transmission.
  • To evaluate the anti-earthquake materials.
  • To investigate which type of structure or material can be earthquake resistant.
  • To evaluate the concept and designing of earthquake-resistant material.
  • To analyze the feature that helps the material and structure to be earthquake resistant.
  • To analyze the current practice and knowledge in designing, construction and planning of the concrete building that is earthquake resistant.

The aim of the study is to conduct a critical analysis of the utilization of hybrid construction material like timber steel for the construction of the advanced multi-storey structure of the building. The research aims to study the construction of building in the municipal cities besides the fault line. Furthermore, the research aims to conduct a case study in Tokyo with this regard.

  • To evaluate the use of timber steel.
  • To analyze the use of timber steel in the construction of the multi-storey building.
  • To evaluate the advantage of using timber steel.
  • To investigate the economic advantage of using timber steel.
  • To study the advantage of timber steel with the aspect to fire resistance.
  • To analyze the application of timber steel in multi-storey buildings.
  • To analyze the implication of timber steel in a multi-storey building.
  • To evaluate the efficacy of timber steel in structural engineering.

The aim of the study is to analyze factors for enhancing the steel trusses structural efficacy for making strong and durable skyscrapers. The research aims to conduct a case regarding Dubai buildings. The aim of the study is to design the serviceability, strength and stability structure. Additionally, the structure must be aesthetic and economical. The aim of the study is to develop a structure which will be thereby able to manage the load without any failure of implication throughout the intended life of the building. Therefore, the study aims to examine and analyze some of the accessible measures, by utilizing those measures for a good cause and certainly provide the theoretical background for the measure on the basis of the concept of structure.

  • Examine the factors for enhancing the structural efficacy in the steel trusses.
  • Analyze different materials uses roof truss 2D and develop an inert structure and examine the distortion and the corresponding stress.
  • To develop an inert structure of 2D roof truss through the steel model and explore the deformation and the corresponding stress as well.
  • To compare and contrast the different type of steel efficacy such as structural steel, alloy steel and mild steel.
  • To identify which steel, possess more efficacy among all the three types.

The aim of the study is to analyze the computer-aid design (CAD) limitations that are certainly being applied in the engineering project of today. The research aims to evaluate how CAD limitation will lead the new country toward the environmental and economical problem. For this aspect, the research aims to evaluate the effectiveness as well as the challenges and implication of the CAD in modern engineering projects.

  • To study the concept of CAD in engineering projects.
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of CAD in the project of engineering.
  • To analyze the advantages and disadvantages of CAD in modern engineering.
  • To determine the limitations and implication of CAD in modern engineering.
  • To examine the CAD challenges in modern engineering.
  • To evaluate the significant impact of CAD.

The aim of the study is to evaluate the concreate elastic and strength behaviour in the filled tubular steel sector. The research aims to analyze the structure effectiveness for the oil rigs which are offshore. The general aim of the study is to study different literature that has been previously studied regarding the tubular filled sections, the different shapes that are adopted and the adopted methodologies as well.

  • To study the elastic behaviour and strength of concrete in the filled tubular.
  • To study the elastic properties as well as the strength properties of these kinds of beams.
  • To study the concrete-filled tubular behaviour under the flexure, shear and compression.
  • To conduct a theoretical analysis of filled tubular through the analysis method of finite element.

The aim of the study is to conduct a novel study regarding the usage of waste plastic in bricks manufacturing as well as with them-sand and quarry dust. The research aims to analyze the effectiveness of the method in recycling waste plastic rather than just throwing it in conventional areas of land. Therefore, the major aim of the study is to develop and build an effective way for efficiently using the waste plastic which can certainly pose sustainment threat in the ecological balance, along with the waste of quarry to establish a substitute building material through which the waste plastic scientific disposal, as well as the conventional building material scarcity, can be certainly answered.

  • To analyze the ways for effective utilization of waste plastic.
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of recycling waste plastic for bricks manufacturing.

The aim of the study is conducting novel research on how Iron Nanoparticle (INP) can be used for the Arsenic (iii) removal and treatment from the groundwater. The research aims to analyze the technique effectiveness for making the water of the ground safe and clean for the purpose of agriculture and irrigation.

  • To evaluate the concept of Iron Nanoparticles (INP).
  • To analyze how INP can be used for the removal and treatment of Arsenic (iii).

To evaluate the effectiveness of INP.

The aim of the study is conducting a novel evaluation on the usage of fabricated nanomaterial of graphene for the treatment of water. The study aims to conduct a comparative analysis of the advantage vs the cost-effectiveness of graphene techniques.  Furthermore, the research aims to represent an evaluation of the graphene nanomaterial contribution to the treatment of water. The study aims to discuss and explore various future and upcoming perspective of these materials in the treatment of water. Additionally, the research has made attempt to explore the hazards and nanotoxicity of the graphene materials. Moreover, the study will also provide suggestion and recommendation to discover the overall potential and effectiveness of these materials alongside the nanotoxicity precaution and their hazards as well.

  • To evaluate the usage of graphene for the treatment of water.
  • To determine the advantage vs the cost-effectiveness of the graphene for the treatment of water.

The aim of the study is to conduct a critical analysis of the replacement of river sand by the foundry sand waste in the paver block as an efficient way of reducing the erosion of soil. The research aims to study the alternate material usage in the concrete which involves future changes in the technology of concrete that certainly pave the way to use few of the substitute material that can be thereby used as the structure to the concrete ingredient that can be completely or partially be replaced with one or more than one material. The research also aims to study the waster foundry sand application in concrete. The research also aims to study a different aspect of utilizing waste material in the concrete.

The following are the objective of the study.

  • To find how the replacement of river sand can be an effective way for soil erosion reduction.
  • To analyze the significance of replacing river sand.

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Some tips and tricks to follow in order to make sure that your dissertation topics are great, are to firstly keep your dissertation topic simple yet focused, the choice of words should be so clever that it should pique your reader’s interest.

A large part of a great dissertation topic lies on the fact that whether your dissertation is pursuable or not. If you have an idea, then explore multiple topics first, then go with the one that is the most attractive.

There are multiple areas from where you can find samples related to your dissertation, for example academic search engines, freelance websites, from your university’s library or local library, from your seniors or recent graduates and even from writing service providing websites.

You may come across many great dissertation ideas and topics but not all of them are pursuable. Some things that you can do to make sure that your dissertations are pursuable or not are to do a small scaled qualitative/quantitative study first. Along with it do semiotic analysis, textual analysis and secondary research.

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The specification of final year project's topics may have some influence on the future job or career of students. It, therefore, becomes very crucial to select an apt topic since students are going to do great and extensive research about it, it is possible that such a topic may open doors to different horizons in the field.

In this article, forty topics about structural engineering are presented which can be used for both seminars and graduation projects. There are lots of topic out there, but these are selected from literature and efforts made to specify most novel topics.

These topics deal with various aspects of structures such as improving certain aspects of design, repair damaged structures, study properties of structures under various modes of loading including static and dynamic like seismic forces. These project topics may need numerical modelling, experimental works, or combination thereof.

  • Pushover analysis – cyclic loading, deterioration effect in RC Moment Frames in pushover analysis
  • Rehabilitation – Evaluation of drift distribution
  • Analysis of large dynamic structure in environment industry
  • Theoretical study on High frequency fatigue behavior of concrete
  • Seismic analysis of interlocking blocks in walls
  • Estimation of marine salts behavior around the bridge structures
  • A comparative study on durability of concrete tunnels undertaken in AP irrigation projects
  • Prefabricated multistory structure, exposure to engineering seismicity
  • Shape optimization of Reinforced underground tunnels
  • Properties of Fiber Cement Boards for building partitions
  • Behavior of RC Structures subjected to blasting
  • The use of green materials in the construction of buildings
  • Finite element model for double composite beam
  • A new composite element for FRP Reinforced Concrete Slab
  • Effect of shear lag on anchor bolt tension in a base plate
  • Elastic plastic bending, load carrying capacity of steel members
  • FE Analysis of lateral buckling of a plate curved in nature
  • Green energy and indoor technologies for smart buildings
  • Building environmental assessment methodology
  • Numerical study on strengthening of composite bridges
  • Strengthening effect for RC member under negative bending
  • Effect of negative Poisson’s ratio on  bending of RC member
  • Macroeconomic cause within the life cycle of bridges
  • Long term deflections of long-span bridges
  • Structural damage detection in plates using wavelet theories (transforms)
  • Hybrid Simulations: Theory and Applications
  • Engineered Wood in Cold Climate
  • Mechanical Properties and Engineering Application of Modern Timber
  • Hybrid Structural Systems and Innovation Design Method
  • Design of Reinforced Concrete Block Masonry Basement
  • Nonlinear Analysis of a New 3D Skip-Floor Staggered Shear Wall Structure
  • Advances in Civil Infrastructure Engineering
  • Mechanical Performance of an Irregular Kiewitt Dome Structure
  • Shear Distribution Coefficient Study under Horizontal Force
  • Structural Damage Identification Method and Program Designing Based on Statistical Analysis
  • Prescriptive or Performance Design for Fire?
  • Deflection Control by Design
  • New Code Provisions for Long Term Deflection Calculations
  • Retrofitting and Repairing with composite materials
  • Epoxy Coated Reinforcement and Crack Control

Madeh Izat Hamakareem

Madeh Izat Hamakareem

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Thomas Dean & Hoskins, Inc. (TD&H) is a consulting firm offering comprehensive civil, structural, and environmental services throughout Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Washington. We serve a diverse clientele ranging from unincorporated communities to large cities and individuals to large corporations. We assist our clients through all project phases, from concept development through construction and warranty assistance. TD&H has been satisfying clients since its incorporation in 1965, all the while building an impressive resume of successful projects. TD&H strives to provide innovative engineering solutions to challenging technical problems by assigning professionals who understand the issues and deliver results. We place a high priority on service and measure our success in terms of client satisfaction.

Our Mission

To perform high-quality engineering services that meet or exceed our clients’ desires and expectations, for a fair price, in a timely manner..

We provide engineering services that are a direct reflection of our skilled and knowledgeable staff. Our qualified, intelligent, self-motivated employees achieve high levels of performance, and TD&H encourages excellence by providing interesting projects, promoting professional development, offering a pleasant and cordial work environment, maintaining open communication, and providing compensation commensurate to each employee’s knowledge and ability.

TD&H is fueled by healthy, steady, and conservative growth. We invest time and capital in personnel and equipment to optimize our returns. We continue to look for opportunities in expanding markets and to position TD&H to hire the best people.

We are committed to providing our clients with high quality services at a fair price. We are fair, honest, courteous, and professional. We are sensitive to our clients’ desires and dedicated to their satisfaction.

Our Leadership Team

phd topics in structural engineering

Alex Edwards

Engineer – Civil

Alex’s civil engineering experience includes technical design, oversight, and management of projects throughout Montana and Wyoming. He is distinguished for his expertise in civil design with a strong foundation in site civil grading and utility infrastructure, storm analysis, water modeling, soils testing and analysis, surveying, construction administration, and project procurement and administration. Alex holds a bachelor’s degree in construction engineering technology from Montana State University.

phd topics in structural engineering

Alex Edwards P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Andrew Cooper

Principal/Project Manager

Andrew Cooper joined TD&H in October 2015 in the Media, Pennsylvania office. Andrew works on structural design calculations for residential and commercial structures using primarily timber, masonry, concrete and steel materials and performs Revit & AutoCAD drafting. He graduated with a Civil Engineering degree with a concentration in structural analysis at Widener University in 2016.

phd topics in structural engineering

Andrew Cooper PE

phd topics in structural engineering

Brady Lassila

Project Manager/Bridge Engineer

Brady is a structural engineer with experience in the analysis and design of bridges, culverts, retaining walls, and buildings. He has bridge design and load rating experience from working with public and private clients. Brady is proficient with the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, AASHTO Manual for Bridge Evaluation, Standard Specifications for Highway Bridges, and the Montana Structures Manual. He performs project management, gravity and seismic design, QC review, plan and specification preparation, quantity estimates, and construction services.

phd topics in structural engineering

Brady Lassila P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Chevy Baily

Engineer – Civil/Regional Manager

Chevy’s versatility makes him a valuable asset to TD&H Engineering’s Twin Falls staff since joining the team. Chevy is a civil engineer experienced in airports, planning, municipal services, civil design, construction administration, subdivisions, streets and roads, site plans, grading, and drainage. Chevy holds a degree in civil engineering from Villanova University.

phd topics in structural engineering

Chevy Baily P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Cody Croskey

Engineer - Civil & Environmental

Cody is a civil/environmental engineer with ten years of professional experience. His areas of expertise include civil design, floodplain development management, storm water management, water resource engineering, and construction project oversight. He is also experienced in educational facility site design, transportation engineering, environmental remediation, and stream restoration projects. Cody holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Montana State University.

phd topics in structural engineering

Cody Croskey P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Craig Nadeau

P.e. & principal.

Geotechnical Engineering Manager/Assistant CMT Lab Manager

Craig is a registered professional engineer with a decade of experience and a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering with a Geotechnical focus. He also has experience in construction field and laboratory testing related to geotechnical engineering and construction. Craig is experienced in planning and conducting geotechnical investigations using multiple methods including conventional augered borings, test pits, and Cone Penetration Testing. He is experienced in projects related to the design of roads and pavements, railroads, bridges, and foundations. He also has experience evaluating and assessing slope stability issues, expansive soils, and soft compressible soils. Craig is TD&H Engineering’s Geotechnical Department Manager.

phd topics in structural engineering

Craig Nadeau P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Douglas A. Peppmeier

Vice President/Regional Manager

Doug is a civil engineer and the Regional Manager of the TD&H Engineering Kalispell office.  As the Regional Manager, he is responsible for overseeing all engineering services from initial client contact through final construction.  Doug has been with TD&H Engineering since 2007 and prior to that was a project engineer for a private consulting engineering firm in Portland, OR.  His work experience includes residential, commercial and industrial land development, water, stormwater and wastewater system design, municipal permitting, urban street and county roadway design, public involvement, construction administration, and client liaison.

phd topics in structural engineering

Douglas A. Peppmeier P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Jana Cooper

Pla & principal.

Landscape Architecture Manager

Jana is a Professional Landscape Architect with over a decade of experience in planning, landscape architecture and design. She has contributed to the design, production and management of the planning and landscape architecture department since joining TD&H. Ms. Cooper has managed a wide range of projects through all stages of development. She has worked on many public and private projects and has strong skills related to comprehensive planning, land development and high level design. Jana Cooper has worked on projects from Montana to Arizona as well as internationally including projects in Australia, London, China and the Middle East.

phd topics in structural engineering

Jana Cooper PLA & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Engineer - Civil

John’s career has spanned a broad range of civil engineering disciplines and activities, he has extensive experience is all phases of engineering project execution including project development, engineering studies, design and construction management. In 32 years of engineering, John has planned, designed and managed the construction of roadways, water systems, sanitary and storm sewers, water and sewer treatment systems, and many other facilities.

phd topics in structural engineering

John Juras P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Financial/Human Resources Director

Kelly oversees the accounting and HR departments at TD&H. He also directly assists the President and Corporate Treasurer with the firm’s financial operations. He has over 15 years of experience in corporate accounting and employee benefit programs, including all phases of payroll and the administration of an employee stock ownership plan. Kelly has a Bachelor’s Degree in Mathematics with a minor in history from the University of Great Falls and has completed numerous undergrad accounting courses. He has served as the Secretary for the Great Falls, MT Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Kelly has been with TD&H since 2003.

phd topics in structural engineering

Kelly Okes Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Kyle Palagi

Engineer - Structural

Kyle is a project manager and licensed structural engineer with more than a decade of experience. He earned his Master’s degree from Montana State University while gaining experience in structural design of multi-story buildings. He has a wide variety of project experience including commercial buildings, seismic retrofits, education, healthcare, and industrial structures. Kyle’s background in civil engineering, surveying, materials testing, special inspections, and construction oversight contributes to his skills as a project manager. He takes a practical approach to design while implementing creative solutions that help our clients bring their vision to reality. He strives to bring economy, elegance, and efficiency to all his designs.

phd topics in structural engineering

Kyle Palagi P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Engineer – Civil & Geotechnical/Regional Manager/Vice President

Kyle Scarr is the Bozeman Regional Manager and a civil/geotechnical engineer who specializes in foundation investigations, slope stability, and civil engineering design. He manages a wide range of projects including land developments, site plans, streets, grading, drainage, and water and sewer improvements. Kyle holds his master’s degree in civil engineering with a geotechnical emphasis from Montana State University. He joined TD&H Engineering in 2005 and is a Vice President and Principal of the firm.

phd topics in structural engineering

Kyle Scarr P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Engineer - Structural Design

Lee is a Senior Design Engineer with over 24 years’ experience performing structural calculations and preparing contract construction drawings for the design of commercial and residential building projects up to 100,000 S.F.  He has managed projects with design experience in wood, steel, light gauge steel, CMU, concrete and Post-Tensioned concrete throughout the United States.  Lee manages clients with dedication and responsiveness beginning with sound proposals with a clear view of project scope through solid design documents into construction completion. Lee is keenly aware of the importance of consistent communication between the owner, contractor, and architect from the project’s inception through its completion, emphasizing attention to design detail and project constructability.

phd topics in structural engineering

Lee French P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Marissa Siemens

Principal/Civil Engineer

Marissa is a Principal/Civil Engineer with 14 years of engineering and construction experience.  She has been involved in projects ranging from municipal water systems, arctic drilling rigs, offshore oil and gas wells, and heavy civil construction. Marissa has demonstrated strong skills in engineering design, technical writing and project management. Her particular strengths include offshore oil and gas well design, project management and construction inspection.

phd topics in structural engineering

Marissa Siemens P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Matt is the Regional Manager of the TD&H Engineering. North Dakota office location in Watford City. He graduated from North Dakota State University in 2004 with a Bachelor of Science – Civil Engineering Degree, he is licensed in North Dakota and Montana and belongs to the American Society of City Engineers, National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Watford City Economic Development Corporation. His work with TD&H includes project management, coordination, and design on projects, such as street paving, drainage water, sewer, site civil, master planning and survey projects.

phd topics in structural engineering

Matt Beard P.L.S

phd topics in structural engineering

Matt McGee’s versatility makes him a valuable asset to TD&H Engineering’s Bozeman staff since joining the team in 2006. Matt is a civil/environmental engineer experienced in master planning, municipal services, civil design, construction administration, industrial hygiene, and inspection services. Matt’s environmental experience includes site characterization, wetland delineation, and risk evaluation/mitigation for work plans pertaining to environmental remediation projects. Matt holds a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Montana State University.

phd topics in structural engineering

Matt McGee P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Michelle Bly

P.c.e.d., a.i.c.p. & principal.

Michelle is a Professional Community and Economic Developer, Certified Planner, and Certified Grant Administrator. Her experience includes 24 years of working with municipalities on water and wastewater, transportation, and environmental documentation projects. She also provides municipalities assistance with grant/loan funding, planning documents, construction administration, public involvement, and client advocacy.

phd topics in structural engineering

Michelle Bly P.C.E.D., A.I.C.P. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Civil Department Manager/Civil Engineer

Nate is the Civil Department Manager/Civil Engineer with design and field experience in hydraulics, hydrology, water, wastewater, site development, soils, and transportation design.  Nate’s experience includes modeling, preparation of plans and contract documents, preparation of design reports, surveying, field investigations, and construction administration. He is proficient in several design and modeling software, which include AutoCAD Civil 3D, Autodesk Storm and Sanitary Analysis (SSA), MicroStation, HY-8, FishXing and multiple other software.

phd topics in structural engineering

Nate Young P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Paul Hopkins

Phd, p.e., s.e. & principal.

Paul is the regional manager and heads the Structural department in the Media office.  His experience in the Northeastern, Southwestern and Northwestern United States brings a vast array of project knowledge to the client.  Paul has design expertise with nearly all commercially available building materials and has worked in many different industries including residential, commercial, educational, healthcare and industrial.  Seismic evaluations, historic building renovations, precast design and industrial steel and concrete structures are some of Paul’s favorite to work on.  Paul is also an expert in modeling complex large span wood and steel truss structures.  For several years Paul has also worked in Aerospace and academia with advanced nonlinear finite element analysis modeling techniques and brings this rare combination of civil engineering and stress engineering to the construction industry.  Paul completed his BS in Architectural & Civil Engineering at Drexel University, his MS in Civil Engineering (structures) at Arizona State University and received his PhD from the University of Idaho in 2015.  Currently Paul is an Adjunct Professor at Widener University in the Civil Engineering Department. He is a corresponding member of the NCSEA Existing Building and Structural Retrofit Committee and Basics Education Committee.

phd topics in structural engineering

Paul Hopkins PhD, P.E., S.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Phil Odegard

Engineer - Civil/Regional Manager

Phil has nearly 4 decades’ engineering experience, with significant time spent in the transportation field. He has provided project management, planning, and engineering services throughout Montana, Idaho, and Washington and will implement the lessons and skills he has learned on these projects to TD&H.

Phil Odegard P.E.

phd topics in structural engineering

Rodney Blake

Regional Manager/Structural Engineering Manager

Rodney has structural experience with all structures including bridges, roofs, tanks, foundations, buildings, etc. He is a structural engineer licensed in the states of Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, Vermont and Idaho. He is also licensed in several Canadian provinces. He was hired by TD&H in 1999 and is the Structural Department Manager.

phd topics in structural engineering

Rodney Blake P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Scott Mahurin

P.e., s.e. & principal.

Scott is a licensed professional engineer specializing in structural engineering.  Scott designs new structures and structural retrofits using all common building materials (timber, steel, concrete and masonry).  His design experience includes a variety of projects such as bridges, water holding tanks, health care facilities, school facilities, commercial structures, industrial structures, and blast design and retrofit within petrochemical facilities.  Scott holds a master’s degree in civil engineering with a structural emphasis from Montana State University and joined TD&H Engineering in 2011.

phd topics in structural engineering

Scott Mahurin P.E., S.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Steven Marsh

Steve is the regional manager and civil engineer in our Spokane Office. He is experienced commercial and residential land development, environmental documentation, and regulatory permit acquisition. His experience includes 27 years of environmental and municipal permitting, residential, commercial and industrial land development, water, stormwater and wastewater system design, urban street and county roadway design, public involvement, construction administration, and client liaison.

phd topics in structural engineering

Steven Marsh P.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

Tony Stenlund

Tony began his career working construction.  He is a Principal at TD&H and currently heads the Structural department of the Spokane office.  He is an efficient engineer with a practical understanding of how things should be built.  He prides himself on having clear drawings, on being easy to get a hold of, and easy to work with.  Tony’s expertise is in light frame construction, concrete, and foundation design.

phd topics in structural engineering

Tony Stenlund P.E., S.E. & Principal

phd topics in structural engineering

CEO/President/Regional Manager

Wade is TD&H Engineering’s CEO/President as well as the Regional Manager for the Great Falls office. He has over two decades of experience in civil engineering and has played a key role in the design, production and management of countless projects since joining the firm in 2000. Wade has a Master’s degree in Civil Engineering with an emphasis in hydraulics and is an invaluable member of the TD&H team.

phd topics in structural engineering

Wade DeBoo P.E. & Principal

IMAGES

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COMMENTS

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  2. PhD Program

    Qualifying Examination. Students must pass a written Qualifying Exam for admission to PhD Candidacy in the structures program. The written Qualifying Examination covers the following five core areas of structural engineering: Analysis of truss and frame structures. Structural dynamics. Structural mechanics. Concrete structures. Steel Structures.

  3. Doctoral Studies SE75

    The Ph.D. program is intended to prepare students for a variety of careers in research, teaching and advanced professional practice in the broad sense of structural engineering, encompassing civil and aerospace structures, earthquake and geotechnical engineering, composites, and engineering mechanics. Depending on the student's background and ...

  4. Your complete guide to a PhD in Structural Engineering

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    PhD Studentship in Civil Engineering - Stresstest: Development of a stress testing platform to ensure resilient electricity networks. Newcastle University School of Engineering. Award summary. 100% fees covered, and a minimum tax-free annual living allowance of £18,622 (2023/24 UKRI rate). Overview.

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  10. 9 PhD programmes in Structural Engineering

    This PhD in Structural Engineering and Experimental and Numerical Modelling of Complex Systems is offered at Abertay University. Ph.D. / Full-time, Part-time / On Campus. Abertay UniversityDundee, Scotland, United Kingdom. Add to compare. Engineering Structures. 2,750 EUR / year. 4 years.

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    Lehigh's graduate program in structural engineering focuses on analytical and experimental studies of structural behavior. Students develop the technical knowledge and problem-solving capabilities needed to design and construct complex, large-scale structural systems. A diversity of faculty research allows students to pursue projects that ...

  14. Doing a PhD in Civil Engineering

    Examples of popular civil engineering topics include: Structural Engineering - A PhD in structural engineering could look at how we can manage the impact of earthquakes on skyscrapers in areas of seismic activity to contribute to the development of resilient structures. Alternatively, this could be a local investigation into a single RC beam ...

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    The three-year Doctoral Program in Structural and Geoetchnical Engineering is the third level of the Italian University education system. It guarantees education in scientific research and provides necessary skills to carry out research activities, also at international level, and professional activities of high qualification with particular reference to topics related to Solid and Structural ...

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  19. Thoughts on a PhD In Structural Engineering : r ...

    It will definitely help get into academia though. A PhD won't get you much (if any) more salary than an MS. A PhD is an awesome thing to have. I think it's respectable, even as a structural engineer. Do a PhD while you don't have lifestyle creep or other responsibilities.

  20. 40 Seminar/Project Topics in Structural Engineering

    These project topics may need numerical modelling, experimental works, or combination thereof. Pushover analysis - cyclic loading, deterioration effect in RC Moment Frames in pushover analysis. Rehabilitation - Evaluation of drift distribution. Analysis of large dynamic structure in environment industry. Theoretical study on High frequency ...

  21. PDF Upward Spiral: The Story of the Evolution Tower

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  22. Who We Are

    Who We Are Thomas Dean & Hoskins, Inc. (TD&H) is a consulting firm offering comprehensive civil, structural, and environmental services throughout Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Washington. We serve a diverse clientele ranging from unincorporated communities to large cities and individuals to large corporations. We assist our clients through all project phases, from concept…

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